Skip Navigation

Close and don't show again.

Your browser is out of date.

You may not get the full experience here on National Journal.

Please upgrade your browser to any of the following supported browsers:

John Carter John Carter

NEXT :
This ad will end in seconds
 
Close X

Want access to this content? Learn More »

Forget Your Password?

Don't have an account? Register »

Reveal Navigation
 

 

Almanac

Search

Enter your search query or use our Advanced People Search. Need Help? View our search tips

View Saved Lists
View Saved Lists
Republican

Rep. John Carter (R)

John Carter Contact
Back to top
Email: n/a
DC Contact Information

Phone: 202-225-3864

Address: 409 CHOB, DC 20515

State Office Contact Information

Phone: (512) 246-1600

Address: 1717 North IH 35, Round Rock TX 78664-2901

Temple TX

Phone: (254) 933-1392

Fax: (254) 933-1650

Address: 6544B South General Bruce Drive, Temple TX 76502-5811

John Carter Staff
Back to top
Sort by INTEREST NAME TITLE
Gilleland, Steven
Legislative Director
Bourn, Grady
Legislative Assistant
Gilleland, Steven
Legislative Director
Bourn, Grady
Legislative Assistant
Gilleland, Steven
Legislative Director
Bourn, Grady
Legislative Assistant
Gilleland, Steven
Legislative Director
Gilleland, Steven
Legislative Director
Gilleland, Steven
Legislative Director
Gilleland, Steven
Legislative Director
Baran, Stephen
Military Fellow
Bourn, Grady
Legislative Assistant
Gilleland, Steven
Legislative Director
Bourn, Grady
Legislative Assistant
Bourn, Grady
Legislative Assistant
Bourn, Grady
Legislative Assistant
Bourn, Grady
Legislative Assistant
Gilleland, Steven
Legislative Director
Gilleland, Steven
Legislative Director
Gilleland, Steven
Legislative Director
Schroder, Robert
Department of Homeland Security Fellow
Bourn, Grady
Legislative Assistant
Gilleland, Steven
Legislative Director
Bourn, Grady
Legislative Assistant
Gilleland, Steven
Legislative Director
Gilleland, Steven
Legislative Director
Gilleland, Steven
Legislative Director
Gilleland, Steven
Legislative Director
Gilleland, Steven
Legislative Director
Baran, Stephen
Military Fellow
Bourn, Grady
Legislative Assistant
Gilleland, Steven
Legislative Director
Gilleland, Steven
Legislative Director
Gilleland, Steven
Legislative Director
Bourn, Grady
Legislative Assistant
Gilleland, Steven
Legislative Director
Bourn, Grady
Legislative Assistant
Gilleland, Steven
Legislative Director
Bourn, Grady
Legislative Assistant
Gilleland, Steven
Legislative Director
Gilleland, Steven
Legislative Director
Bourn, Grady
Legislative Assistant
Gilleland, Steven
Legislative Director
Gilleland, Steven
Legislative Director
Zito, Bill
Deputy Chief of Staff
Gilleland, Steven
Legislative Director
Gilleland, Steven
Legislative Director
Schroder, Robert
Department of Homeland Security Fellow
Bourn, Grady
Legislative Assistant
Bourn, Grady
Legislative Assistant
Bourn, Grady
Legislative Assistant
Baran, Stephen
Military Fellow
Bourn, Grady
Legislative Assistant
Browne, Yovanna
Constituent Liaison
Cox, Jordan
Legislative Correspondent
Gilleland, Steven
Legislative Director
Hassmann, Cheryl
Constituent Liaison
Miller, Jonas
Chief of Staff
Nicholas, Jason
Field Representative
Pena, Nancy
Constituent Liaison
Schroder, Robert
Department of Homeland Security Fellow
Zito, Bill
Deputy Chief of Staff
Miller, Jonas
Chief of Staff
Zito, Bill
Deputy Chief of Staff
Baran, Stephen
Military Fellow
Schroder, Robert
Department of Homeland Security Fellow
Bourn, Grady
Legislative Assistant
Cox, Jordan
Legislative Correspondent
Gilleland, Steven
Legislative Director
Browne, Yovanna
Constituent Liaison
Hassmann, Cheryl
Constituent Liaison
Pena, Nancy
Constituent Liaison
Nicholas, Jason
Field Representative
Note: You can only itemize lists in the Interests and Title sections
Save List
X

Your saved lists will appear under My Saved Lists on The Almanac's landing page.

John Carter Committees
Back to top
John Carter Biography
Back to top
  • Elected: 2002, 6th term.
  • District: Texas 31
  • Born: Nov. 06, 1941, Houston
  • Home: Round Rock
  • Education:

    TX Tech. U., B.A. 1964, U. of TX, J.D. 1969

  • Professional Career:

    Practicing atty., 1969-81.

  • Political Career:

    Dist. Ct. judge, 1982-2001.

  • Ethnicity: White/Caucasian
  • Religion:

    Christian

  • Family: Married (Erika); 4 children

John Carter, a conservative Republican first elected in 2002, brings an ex-judge’s no-nonsense, law-and-order perspective to homeland security and immigration as the chairman of the Appropriations subcommittee on those issues. Read More

John Carter, a conservative Republican first elected in 2002, brings an ex-judge’s no-nonsense, law-and-order perspective to homeland security and immigration as the chairman of the Appropriations subcommittee on those issues.

Carter grew up in Houston and graduated from Texas Tech University and the University of Texas law school. He practiced law in Williamson County and served as a municipal judge in Round Rock. He was appointed a district judge in 1981 by Republican Gov. Bill Clements and in 1982 stood for election. Judicial elections are partisan in Texas, and Carter was the first Republican judge elected in Williamson County. Carter became known as the father of the county Republican Party.

In 2001, after a three-judge district court created a new Republican 31st District stretching from Williamson County to Houston, Carter retired from the bench and ran for Congress. The real contest was among the eight candidates for the Republican nomination. Carter’s main rivals were Peter Wareing, the son-in-law of Texas oilman Jack Blanton, and Brad Barton, son of Rep. Joe Barton of the 6th District. In the primary, Wareing led with 37% to 26% for Carter and 16% for Barton.

In the four-week runoff campaign, Carter attacked Wareing as a liberal in disguise, pointing to his campaign contributions to Democrats like Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee of Houston. When Wareing proposed that each candidate sign a “clean campaign pledge,” Carter offered what he called a “homestead pledge”—a ploy to highlight his charge that Wareing was a Houston carpetbagger who had rented an apartment in the district in order to run for the seat. Rep. Barton endorsed Carter as “the only true conservative in this race.” Wareing outspent Carter more than 2-to-1, but Carter won 57%-43%. He got 78% of the vote in Williamson County, which cast 33% of the vote. Carter won the general election easily and has had little trouble winning reelection.

In the House, Carter has been a reliable conservative. He did oppose some of the more drastic GOP proposals to cut spending in 2012, such as a failed amendment to impose an across-the-board cut in energy and water appropriations. He also was able to fight off a Republican attempt in 2011 to sharply cut spending for military bands, arguing that they “are an integral part to the patriotism that keeps our soldiers’ hearts beating fast.” He joined the Tea Party Caucus when it formed in July 2010 and was among the co-sponsors of the so-called “birther” bill in 2009 requiring future presidential candidates to provide proof of U.S. citizenship. Carter accused the Pentagon of watering down a 2010 report on the Fort Hood shootings to avoid discussing Islamic terrorism and has tried since then to award Purple Heart medals to the shooting victims so their families can receive benefits.

Taking over as Homeland Appropriations chairman, Carter argued forcefully for spending more to secure the U.S. Mexico border, but also acknowledged the need to “show compassion” to immigrants who are already in the United States. He took part in bipartisan discussions on a potential compromise on comprehensive reform measure. He had a few earlier legislative accomplishments. On the Judiciary Committee, he won passage of a bill to establish penalties for identity theft and also was successful in passing his Terrorist Penalties Enhancement Act.

He served three terms in the leadership as House Republican Conference secretary, becoming the chief antagonist of New York Democratic Rep. Charles Rangel in 2009. He introduced several resolutions seeking to remove Rangel as chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee during the ethics investigation of Rangel, who ultimately was removed as head of the committee and censured for transgressions. But Carter himself drew Democrats’ fire for an alleged ethical lapse after he reportedly failed to disclose nearly $300,000 in profits from sales of oil stocks in 2006 and 2007. Carter responded by taking the offensive, noting that he had paid all taxes on his stock transactions and had admitted his errors, and then challenged Rangel to do the same. He stepped down from the post after the 2012 elections when Republicans sought to diversify their ranks; his replacement was North Carolina’s Virginia Foxx.

Show Less
John Carter Election Results
Back to top
2012 General
John Carter (R)
Votes: 145,348
Percent: 61.28%
Stephen Wyman (D)
Votes: 82,977
Percent: 34.98%
Ethan Garofolo (Lib)
Votes: 8,862
Percent: 3.74%
2012 Primary
John Carter (R)
Votes: 32,917
Percent: 75.99%
Eric Klingemann (R)
Votes: 10,400
Percent: 24.01%
Prior Winning Percentages
2010 (83%), 2008 (60%), 2006 (58%), 2004 (65%), 2002 (69%)
John Carter Votes and Bills
Back to top NJ Vote Ratings

National Journal’s rating system is an objective method of analyzing voting. The liberal score means that the lawmaker’s votes were more liberal than that percentage of his colleagues’ votes. The conservative score means his votes were more conservative than that percentage of his colleagues’ votes. The composite score is an average of a lawmaker’s six issue-based scores. See all NJ Voting

More Liberal
More Conservative
2013 2012 2011
Economic 36 (L) : 63 (C) 38 (L) : 60 (C) - (L) : 90 (C)
Social 16 (L) : 74 (C) 18 (L) : 80 (C) - (L) : 83 (C)
Foreign 24 (L) : 68 (C) 9 (L) : 86 (C) 9 (L) : 86 (C)
Composite 28.5 (L) : 71.5 (C) 23.2 (L) : 76.8 (C) 8.3 (L) : 91.7 (C)
Interest Group Ratings

The vote ratings by 10 special interest groups provide insight into a lawmaker’s general ideology and the degree to which he or she agrees with the group’s point of view. Two organizations provide just one combined rating for 2011 and 2012, the two sessions of the 112th Congress. They are the ACLU and the ITIC. About the interest groups.

20112012
FRC9083
LCV911
CFG6066
ITIC-73
NTU7268
20112012
COC100-
ACLU-0
ACU8484
ADA05
AFSCME0-
Key House Votes

The key votes show how a member of Congress voted on the major bills of the year. N indicates a "no" vote; Y a "yes" vote. If a member voted "present" or was absent, the bill caption is not shown. For a complete description of the bills included in key votes, see the Almanac's Guide to Usage.

    • Pass GOP budget
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • End fiscal cliff
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • Extend payroll tax cut
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • Find AG in contempt
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Stop student loan hike
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Repeal health care
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Raise debt limit
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Pass cut, cap, balance
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Defund Planned Parenthood
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Repeal lightbulb ban
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Add endangered listings
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Speed troop withdrawal
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Regulate financial firms
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2010
    • Pass tax cuts for some
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2010
    • Stop detainee transfers
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2010
    • Legalize immigrants' kids
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2010
    • Repeal don't ask, tell
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2010
    • Limit campaign funds
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2010
    • Overturn Ledbetter
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Pass $820 billion stimulus
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Let guns in national parks
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Pass cap-and-trade
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Bar federal abortion funds
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Pass health care bill
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Bail out financial markets
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2008
    • Repeal D.C. gun law
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2008
    • Overhaul FISA
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2008
    • Increase minimum wage
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • Expand SCHIP
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • Raise CAFE standards
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • Share immigration data
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
    • Foreign aid abortion ban
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
    • Ban gay bias in workplace
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • Withdraw troops 8/08
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • No operations in Iran
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • Free trade with Peru
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
Read More
 
Browse The Almanac
Congressional Leadership
and Committees

House Committees
Senate Committees
Joint Committees
Leadership Roster
About Almanac
almanac cover
The Almanac is a members-only database of searchable profiles compiled and adapted from the Almanac of American Politics. Comprehensive online profiles include biographical and political summaries of elected officials, campaign expenditures, voting records, interest-group ratings, and congressional staff look-ups. In-depth overviews of each state and house district are included as well, along with demographic data, analysis of voting trends, and political histories.
Members: Buy the book at 25% off retail.
Order Now
Need Help?

Contact Us:

202.266.7900 | membership@nationaljournal.com