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Republican

Sen. Richard Burr (R)

Richard Burr Contact
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Email: n/a
DC Contact Information

Phone: 202-224-3154

Address: 217 RSOB, DC 20510

Websites: burr.senate.gov
State Office Contact Information

Phone: (336) 631-5125

Address: 2000 West First Street, Winston-Salem NC 27104-4225

Wilmington NC

Phone: (910) 251-1058

Fax: (910) 251-7975

Address: 201 North Front Street, Wilmington NC 28401-5089

Asheville NC

Phone: (828) 350-2437

Fax: (828) 350-2439

Address: 151 Patton Avenue, Asheville NC 28801-2689

Rocky Mount NC

Phone: (252) 977-9522

Fax: (252) 977-7902

Address: 100 Coast Line Street, Rocky Mount NC 27804-5849

Gastonia NC

Phone: (704) 833-0854

Fax: (704) 833-1467

Address: 181 South Street, Gastonia NC 28052-4126

Richard Burr Staff
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Sort by INTEREST NAME TITLE
Hickman, Natasha
Legislative Director
Denton, Wills
Legislative Correspondent
Sneeden, Robert
Legislative Correspondent
Perrotta, Steve
Retirement Policy Director
Hickman, Natasha
Legislative Director
Toppings, Chris
Deputy Legislative Director
Toppings, Chris
Deputy Legislative Director
Hickman, Natasha
Legislative Director
McDonald, John
Legislative Assistant
Toppings, Chris
Deputy Legislative Director
Hawks, Ann
Legislative Counsel
Toppings, Chris
Deputy Legislative Director
Toppings, Chris
Deputy Legislative Director
Hawks, Ann
Legislative Counsel
Curtis, Steve
Military Fellow
Tucker, Brooks
Senior Policy Advisor
Curtis, Steve
Military Fellow
Livingston, Lori
Director of Veterans' and Military Affairs
Ramos, Cynthia
Legislative Aide
Tucker, Brooks
Senior Policy Advisor
Green, Steven
Western Regional Director
Hickman, Natasha
Legislative Director
Regan, Garth
Director of Field Operations; Deputy Director of Economic Development
Green, Steven
Western Regional Director
Hickman, Natasha
Legislative Director
Regan, Garth
Director of Field Operations; Deputy Director of Economic Development
Toppings, Chris
Deputy Legislative Director
Perrotta, Steve
Retirement Policy Director
Hawks, Ann
Legislative Counsel
Denton, Wills
Legislative Correspondent
McDonald, John
Legislative Assistant
Sneeden, Robert
Legislative Correspondent
Denton, Wills
Legislative Correspondent
McDonald, John
Legislative Assistant
Sneeden, Robert
Legislative Correspondent
Hawks, Ann
Legislative Counsel
Hawks, Ann
Legislative Counsel
Hawks, Ann
Legislative Counsel
Toppings, Chris
Deputy Legislative Director
Toppings, Chris
Deputy Legislative Director
Ramos, Cynthia
Legislative Aide
Tucker, Brooks
Senior Policy Advisor
Perrotta, Steve
Retirement Policy Director
Perrotta, Steve
Retirement Policy Director
Denton, Wills
Legislative Correspondent
Hawks, Ann
Legislative Counsel
Rom, Colin
Legislative Correspondent
Hawks, Ann
Legislative Counsel
Tucker, Brooks
Senior Policy Advisor
Toppings, Chris
Deputy Legislative Director
Toppings, Chris
Deputy Legislative Director
Hawks, Ann
Legislative Counsel
Hawks, Ann
Legislative Counsel
Bobbitt, Lee
Legislative Assistant
Denton, Wills
Legislative Correspondent
Sneeden, Robert
Legislative Correspondent
Curtis, Steve
Military Fellow
Tucker, Brooks
Senior Policy Advisor
Ramos, Cynthia
Legislative Aide
Tucker, Brooks
Senior Policy Advisor
Denton, Wills
Legislative Correspondent
Dombrowski, Matt
Correspondence Director; Systems Administrator
Denton, Wills
Legislative Correspondent
Perrotta, Steve
Retirement Policy Director
Perrotta, Steve
Retirement Policy Director
Bobbitt, Lee
Legislative Assistant
Rom, Colin
Legislative Correspondent
Curtis, Steve
Military Fellow
Livingston, Lori
Director of Veterans' and Military Affairs
Ramos, Cynthia
Legislative Aide
Tucker, Brooks
Senior Policy Advisor
Hawks, Ann
Legislative Counsel
Bobbitt, Lee
Legislative Assistant
Denton, Wills
Legislative Correspondent
McDonald, John
Legislative Assistant
Sneeden, Robert
Legislative Correspondent
Bobbitt, Lee
Legislative Assistant
Hawks, Ann
Legislative Counsel
Perrotta, Steve
Retirement Policy Director
Hawks, Ann
Legislative Counsel
Hawks, Ann
Legislative Counsel
Bobbitt, Lee
Legislative Assistant
Denton, Wills
Legislative Correspondent
Sneeden, Robert
Legislative Correspondent
Hawks, Ann
Legislative Counsel
Hawks, Ann
Legislative Counsel
Toppings, Chris
Deputy Legislative Director
Denton, Wills
Legislative Correspondent
Dombrowski, Matt
Correspondence Director; Systems Administrator
Sneeden, Robert
Legislative Correspondent
Perrotta, Steve
Retirement Policy Director
Bobbitt, Lee
Legislative Assistant
Toppings, Chris
Deputy Legislative Director
Denton, Wills
Legislative Correspondent
Dombrowski, Matt
Correspondence Director; Systems Administrator
Perrotta, Steve
Retirement Policy Director
Denton, Wills
Legislative Correspondent
Sneeden, Robert
Legislative Correspondent
Hawks, Ann
Legislative Counsel
Dombrowski, Matt
Correspondence Director; Systems Administrator
Denton, Wills
Legislative Correspondent
McDonald, John
Legislative Assistant
Hawks, Ann
Legislative Counsel
Tucker, Brooks
Senior Policy Advisor
Hawks, Ann
Legislative Counsel
Denton, Wills
Legislative Correspondent
McDonald, John
Legislative Assistant
Sneeden, Robert
Legislative Correspondent
Denton, Wills
Legislative Correspondent
McDonald, John
Legislative Assistant
Sneeden, Robert
Legislative Correspondent
Curtis, Steve
Military Fellow
Livingston, Lori
Director of Veterans' and Military Affairs
Ramos, Cynthia
Legislative Aide
Tucker, Brooks
Senior Policy Advisor
Bobbitt, Lee
Legislative Assistant
Bobbitt, Lee
Legislative Assistant
Toppings, Chris
Deputy Legislative Director
Hawks, Ann
Legislative Counsel
Bobbitt, Lee
Legislative Assistant
Bradbury, Janet
Field Representative
Calarco, Rosalie
Constituent Advocate
Clark, Esther
Constituent Advocate
Collins, Rene
Senior Constituent Advocate
Curtis, Steve
Military Fellow
Davis, Andrea
Constituent Services Director
Denton, Wills
Legislative Correspondent
Dombrowski, Matt
Correspondence Director; Systems Administrator
Evans, Norris
Constituent Advocate
Fenley, Mike
Field Representative
Gillon, Beverly
Constituent Advocate
Green, Steven
Western Regional Director
Harder, Hilda
Special Projects Coordinator
Hatfield, Susan
Senior Constituent Advocate
Hawkins, Brandon
Constituent Advocate
Hawks, Ann
Legislative Counsel
Helsley, David
Constituent Advocate
Hickman, Natasha
Legislative Director
Hicks, Rachel
Press Secretary
Livingston, Lori
Director of Veterans' and Military Affairs
McDonald, John
Legislative Assistant
Myers, Dean
Chief of Staff
Perrotta, Steve
Retirement Policy Director
Ramos, Cynthia
Legislative Aide
Regan, Garth
Director of Field Operations; Deputy Director of Economic Development
Rom, Colin
Legislative Correspondent
Shaffner, Judy
Constituent Advocate
Slate, Taylor
Staff Assistant
Sneeden, Robert
Legislative Correspondent
Sutton, Sarah
Tour Program Coordinator
Tilley, Chad
Special Assistant; State Scheduler
Toppings, Chris
Deputy Legislative Director
Tucker, Brooks
Senior Policy Advisor
Walker, Polly
Deputy Chief of Staff
Ward, Josh
Field Representative
Watkins, Becca
Communications Director
Weiss, Emil
Staff Assistant
Wilson, Eric
Constituent Advocate
Dombrowski, Matt
Correspondence Director; Systems Administrator
Tucker, Brooks
Senior Policy Advisor
Calarco, Rosalie
Constituent Advocate
Clark, Esther
Constituent Advocate
Collins, Rene
Senior Constituent Advocate
Evans, Norris
Constituent Advocate
Gillon, Beverly
Constituent Advocate
Hatfield, Susan
Senior Constituent Advocate
Hawkins, Brandon
Constituent Advocate
Helsley, David
Constituent Advocate
Shaffner, Judy
Constituent Advocate
Wilson, Eric
Constituent Advocate
Ramos, Cynthia
Legislative Aide
Myers, Dean
Chief of Staff
Watkins, Becca
Communications Director
Harder, Hilda
Special Projects Coordinator
Sutton, Sarah
Tour Program Coordinator
Hawks, Ann
Legislative Counsel
Walker, Polly
Deputy Chief of Staff
Regan, Garth
Director of Field Operations; Deputy Director of Economic Development
Davis, Andrea
Constituent Services Director
Dombrowski, Matt
Correspondence Director; Systems Administrator
Green, Steven
Western Regional Director
Livingston, Lori
Director of Veterans' and Military Affairs
Perrotta, Steve
Retirement Policy Director
Regan, Garth
Director of Field Operations; Deputy Director of Economic Development
Curtis, Steve
Military Fellow
Bobbitt, Lee
Legislative Assistant
McDonald, John
Legislative Assistant
Denton, Wills
Legislative Correspondent
Rom, Colin
Legislative Correspondent
Sneeden, Robert
Legislative Correspondent
Hickman, Natasha
Legislative Director
Toppings, Chris
Deputy Legislative Director
Hicks, Rachel
Press Secretary
Bradbury, Janet
Field Representative
Fenley, Mike
Field Representative
Ward, Josh
Field Representative
Tilley, Chad
Special Assistant; State Scheduler
Tilley, Chad
Special Assistant; State Scheduler
Slate, Taylor
Staff Assistant
Weiss, Emil
Staff Assistant
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Richard Burr Committees
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Richard Burr Biography
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  • Elected: 2004, term expires 2016, 2nd term.
  • State: North Carolina
  • Born: Nov. 30, 1955, Charlottesville, VA
  • Home: Winston-Salem
  • Education:

    Wake Forest U., B.A. 1978

  • Professional Career:

    Natl. sales mgr., Carswell Distributing, 1978–94.

  • Political Career:

    U.S. House of Reps., 1994-2004.

  • Ethnicity: White/Caucasian
  • Religion:

    Methodist

  • Family: Married (Brooke); 2 children

Republican Richard Burr, North Carolina’s senior senator, was first elected to the Senate in 2004 after serving 10 years in the House. A hard-working and conscientious conservative, Burr has not built the national profile of other senators and has been stymied in his attempts to enter the Senate GOP leadership ranks. But his ascension to the chairmanship of the Senate Intelligence Committee in 2015 offered him a chance to prominently shape debates over surveillance and terrorism. Read More

Republican Richard Burr, North Carolina’s senior senator, was first elected to the Senate in 2004 after serving 10 years in the House. A hard-working and conscientious conservative, Burr has not built the national profile of other senators and has been stymied in his attempts to enter the Senate GOP leadership ranks. But his ascension to the chairmanship of the Senate Intelligence Committee in 2015 offered him a chance to prominently shape debates over surveillance and terrorism.

A distant relative of Vice President Aaron Burr, he grew up a minister’s son in Winston-Salem, was a star football player at Reynolds High School and Wake Forest University, and then worked in sales for national wholesaler Carswell Distributing. In 1992, Burr ran against Rep. Steve Neal, a Democrat first elected in 1974. Although outspent 3-to-1, he lost by a relatively narrow 53%-46%. Neal retired in 1994 and Burr ran again, this time winning a solid 57% of the vote. He did not have a serious challenger in the next four House elections.

In the House, Burr had a mostly conservative voting record. On the Energy and Commerce Committee, his early cause was streamlining the Food and Drug Administration’s drug and medical device approval process, which he argued would speed lifesaving products to the market. For over two years, he worked with the agency, doctors, patients, consumer groups, and the pharmaceutical industry to come up with a consensus. With broad bipartisan support, his FDA Modernization Act became law in 1997. He also helped to set up the National Institute for Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering at the National Institutes of Health. After the September 11 attacks, he sponsored laws to improve defenses against bioterrorism. He sought a crackdown on illegal textile imports but backed President George W. Bush’s call for trade promotion authority after securing promises that the local textile industry would have a seat at the table. He called it a difficult vote but said it could help make U.S. textiles more competitive internationally.

In 2004, a major issue for him was a plan to end the tobacco quota system in place since 1938 with a government buyout of quota holders. The entire North Carolina delegation favored it; tobacco quotas had been cut back in recent years and seemed likely to be again. At issue was whether the buyout should be coupled with FDA regulation of tobacco. The Senate passed a corporate tax bill with both the buyout and FDA regulation. In the House, Burr favored the buyout without FDA regulation, arguing that the toxicity of cigarettes should be regulated by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and that package labeling should fall under the Federal Trade Commission. Burr was appointed to the conference committee, where he held out for the buyout without FDA regulation; the Senate yielded, and the bill was enacted to reflect his preferences.

Burr had promised to serve only five terms in the House and by the early 2000s, he wanted to run for the Senate. In 2002, when GOP Sen. Jesse Helms retired, he deferred to fellow Republican Elizabeth Dole, who had the backing of the Bush White House. Two years later, Democratic Sen. John Edwards was running for president, and Burr had the shot he was waiting for. He had $2 million in his campaign treasury and, this time, had the support of White House political strategist Karl Rove.

He had serious opposition from Erskine Bowles, the White House chief of staff under President Bill Clinton who had had lost the 2002 Senate race 54%-45% to Dole. Bowles had deep roots in North Carolina. His father Hargrove “Skipper” Bowles was the Democratic nominee for governor in 1972, and his wife, Crandall Close, headed Springs Industries, a large textile firm started by her family. As Clinton’s top aide, Bowles negotiated the 1997 legislation that helped produce a balanced federal budget for the first time in years. And he had earned the respect of Republican leaders even as they seethed with mistrust of Clinton.

Bowles started running ads in May and led in polls until September. Both candidates spent about $13 million. Burr held back on ads until then and, having conserved resources, had a money advantage in the last two months. Bowles ran on a 10-point economic program and touted his ability to work with both parties while depicting Burr as the king of the special interests, especially the pharmaceutical and tobacco companies. Republicans made much of Burr’s role in blocking FDA regulation of tobacco. For his part, Burr linked Bowles to Clinton’s policies on tax increases, welfare for immigrants, and trade with China.

On Election Day, Bush carried North Carolina 56%-44% in his reelection bid, and Burr beat Bowles 52%-47%. Bowles won big majorities in rural black-majority counties and in the counties with Durham and Chapel Hill. Burr carried almost every rural county in the Piedmont and the mountains. Later, when he co-chaired President Barack Obama’s fiscal commission, Bowles said of Burr: “I think by the grace of God we both ended up in the exact right jobs for North Carolina. ... I can tell you from firsthand experience nobody works harder or is smarter than this guy in Washington.”

In the Senate, Burr has shown little interest in self-promotion. He told The Charlotte Observer in 2009: “I tend to be more of a policy guy than I am a guy who shows up on the 24-hour talk shows or a guy who goes to the floor and speaks.” He has leaned conservative on cultural issues and initially toward the center on foreign policy, although he has moved further to the right in that area since Democrat Barack Obama became president.

In taking the Intelligence chairmanship, Burr was expected to maintain better relations with the Obama administration's spy agency chiefs than the previous Democratic chairman, California's Dianne Feinstein. In contrast to Feinstein and other Democrats, who said they didn't know about the CIA's abuse of terrorist detainees, he told McClatchy Newspapers: We’re going to focus on real-time oversight, so nobody can ever say again that they forgot or they weren’t briefed or they didn’t know,” Burr said.

 

Read more here: http://www.charlotteobserver.com/2014/12/12/5380982/richard-burr-incoming-head-of.html#.VNTbpMaNXJw#storylink=chas resisted reining in those agencies' power in the face of domestic snooping revelations, and was likely to turn back attempts at greater openness when sections of the USA Patriot Act came up for reauthorization. “I personally don’t believe that anything that goes on in the Intelligence Committee should ever be discussed publicly,” he told reporters in March 2014. “If I had my way, with the exception of nominees, there would never be a public intelligence hearing.”

He occasionally has shown a willingness to take on far-right colleagues; he said in July 2013 that talk of shutting down the federal government over the Affordable Care Act was "the dumbest idea I've ever heard." A year later, he worked with Republicans Orrin Hatch of Utah and Tom Coburn of Oklahoma on a comprehensive alternative to the law. It retained many of the law's most popular elements but guaranteed coverage to people with pre-existing medical conditions only if they maintained "continuous coverage." The measure drew widespread media attention but failed to gain any political traction.

In 2005, he won enactment of a bill to create the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority to develop vaccines and other countermeasures to biological terrorism or a pandemic, and he cosponsored reauthorization of the bill in 2009 with the late Edward Kennedy, D-Mass. He was an original cosponsor of the food safety bill that passed in 2010. More recently, Burr was part of a bipartisan group of senators that struck a deal in 2013 to keep down student loan interest rates by tying those rates to the government's cost of borrowing. It passed the Senate on an 81-18 vote and was signed into law.

Burr also seems to have a soft spot for animals. He sponsored a bill to bar the National Institutes of Health from recalling chimpanzees from retirement at their haven in Keithville, La., for medical research. And in 2010, he cosponsored successful legislation that criminalized so-called animal crush videos, which depict small animals being tortured to death. He also has worked on ways to manage the wild horse population around the Outer Banks.

As the ranking minority member on the Veterans’ Affairs Committee, Burr in 2012 cosponsored a bipartisan bill that became law aimed at ensuring veterans receive dignified burials. He and other lawmakers introduced the bill after a World War II veteran was found buried in a cardboard box in Florida. Burr also cosponsored with Republican Sens. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina and John McCain of Arizona a revision of the GI Bill of Rights that would allow veterans to transfer half their benefits to spouses or children after six years and all of them after 12 years. The Senate ultimately passed a bill that went even further, allowing veterans with three years of service to get tuition at the most expensive of their state’s public colleges. In December 2010, Burr surprised his conservative supporters when he voted to end the “don’t ask, don’t tell” ban on openly gay service personnel.

After a scandal erupted at the Veterans' Affairs Department in 2014 over mismanagement and overly long wait times for treating patients, Burr found himself at the center of an acrimonious spat. He wrote an open letter that the staff at various veterans groups “has ignored the constant VA problems expressed by their members and is more interested in their own livelihoods and Washington connections than they are to the needs of their own members.” His comments outraged those groups; an official at Disabled American Veterans said the senator “shows no interest in pursuing serious policy solutions, preferring instead to launch cheap political attacks on the integrity of leaders of veterans organizations that do not agree with him.”

One area where Burr takes a strong conservative line was immigration. In 2006, he voted against the Senate immigration overhaul bill because he said it would lead to “blanket amnesty” for illegal immigrants. During negotiations on the compromise bill the following year, Burr supported the “touchback” amendment that would have forced illegal immigrants to return to their home countries before applying for visas. When the amendment was voted down, he voted against allowing the compromise bill to advance. Unlike some conservatives, however, he said in January 2013 that he would keep an open mind about a comprehensive immigration reform proposal drafted by a bipartisan group of senators. But he ultimately voted against the Senate-passed measure, saying it didn't do enough to secure the border.

During the financial crisis in 2008, Burr voted with many Democrats for the $700 billion government rescue of the financial industry, but he later had reservations and opposed release of the second half of the money from the Troubled Asset Relief Program. He also attracted some unfavorable attention during the crisis when he said he had advised his wife to withdraw as much cash as possible out of ATMs.

Burr cast a controversial vote in early 2012. When a bill aimed at banning insider trading by members of Congress was brought up on the Senate floor, there was little doubt it would pass. The legislation gained momentum after Congress was shamed into acting after a 60 Minutes exposé on the practice. On a 96-3 vote, Burr was one of the three dissenters and received widespread criticism. The left-leaning blog Huffington Post reported that Burr stood to gain from his natural gas tax-credit bill because he had personal investments in the natural gas industry. Burr denied any attempt to profit from past legislation. Defending his actions on a local radio show, Burr said that insider trading bans were already on the books.

Burr has had an interest in moving up in the Senate leadership. In 2007, he lost a bid for Republican Conference chairman to Lamar Alexander of Tennessee on a 31-16 vote. But in January 2009, he was named chief deputy whip. In October 2011, Burr said he intended to run for Senate Republican whip, the No. 2 slot in the GOP leadership chain. However, in March 2012, Burr changed his mind and said he’d rather focus on legislation, clearing the way for Texas' John Cornyn to take the job.

When he came up for reelection in 2010, there was some speculation that Burr would encounter serious opposition, considering Obama’s victory in North Carolina in 2008 and Dole’s defeat for reelection to the Senate. Moreover, polls showed Burr had a low profile in the state. But the strongest possible Democratic challenger, state Attorney General Roy Cooper, widely respected for his work in the case of three Duke University lacrosse players falsely accused of rape, declined to run. Burr’s opponent became Secretary of State Elaine Marshall.

But she came out of the primary contest with little money and spent $2.8 million altogether. Burr raised $11 million. Marshall hit him for supporting the Wall Street bailout and dubbed him “Bank Run” Burr for his ATM advice to his wife. None of this got much traction. Marshall also got no help from the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee, which was busy defending a dozen Democratic-held seats that year. Burr won 55%-43%, losing in Charlotte, Fayetteville, and all the black-majority counties, but carrying virtually everything else. A prolific fundraiser, Burr in 2012 was named in Washingtonian magazine’s anonymous survey of congressional staffers as one of the Senate’s biggest “party animals,” in recognition of his frequent money-raising events.

Rumors abounded in North Carolina in 2014 that Burr might retire in 2016 rather than face a challenge from a top-tier Democratic recruit such as Anthony Foxx, a former Charlotte mayor who became Secretary of Transportation. But Burr told National Journal the rumors weren't true, and that Foxx had assured him he wouldn't run. A Public Policy Polling survey in February 2015 showed that despite a low approval rating (34%), he had solid leads over would-be Democratic challengers.

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Richard Burr Election Results
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2010 General
Richard Burr (R)
Votes: 1,458,046
Percent: 54.81%
Spent: $10,868,382
Elaine Marshall
Votes: 1,145,074
Percent: 43.05%
Spent: $2,894,468
Michael Beitler
Votes: 55,687
Percent: 2.09%
2010 Primary
Richard Burr (R)
Votes: 297,993
Percent: 80.11%
Brad Jones
Votes: 37,616
Percent: 10.11%
Eddie Burks
Votes: 22,111
Percent: 5.94%
Prior Winning Percentages
2004 (52%), House: 2002 (70%), 2000 (93%), 1998 (68%), 1996 (62%), 1994 (57%)
Richard Burr Votes and Bills
Back to top NJ Vote Ratings

National Journal’s rating system is an objective method of analyzing voting. The liberal score means that the lawmaker’s votes were more liberal than that percentage of his colleagues’ votes. The conservative score means his votes were more conservative than that percentage of his colleagues’ votes. The composite score is an average of a lawmaker’s six issue-based scores. See all NJ Voting

More Liberal
More Conservative
2013 2012 2011
Economic 24 (L) : 74 (C) 18 (L) : 81 (C) - (L) : 94 (C)
Social 19 (L) : 79 (C) 25 (L) : 74 (C) - (L) : 88 (C)
Foreign 37 (L) : 62 (C) 15 (L) : 84 (C) 24 (L) : 74 (C)
Composite 27.5 (L) : 72.5 (C) 19.8 (L) : 80.2 (C) 11.3 (L) : 88.7 (C)
Interest Group Ratings

The vote ratings by 10 special interest groups provide insight into a lawmaker’s general ideology and the degree to which he or she agrees with the group’s point of view. Two organizations provide just one combined rating for 2011 and 2012, the two sessions of the 112th Congress. They are the ACLU and the ITIC. About the interest groups.

20112012
FRC8571
LCV914
CFG8075
ITIC-75
NTU8778
20112012
COC100-
ACLU-25
ACU9488
ADA100
AFSCME0-
Key Senate Votes

The key votes show how a member of Congress voted on the major bills of the year. N indicates a "no" vote; Y a "yes" vote. If a member voted "present" or was absent, the bill caption is not shown. For a complete description of the bills included in key votes, see the Almanac's Guide to Usage.

    • End fiscal cliff
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Block faith exemptions
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • Approve gas pipeline
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Approve farm bill
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • Let cyber bill proceed
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • Block Gitmo transfers
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Raise debt limit
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Pass balanced budget amendment
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Stop EPA climate regulations
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Proceed to Cordray vote
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Require talking filibuster
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Regulate financial firms
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2010
    • Pass tax cuts for some
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2010
    • Legalize immigrants' kids
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2010
    • Ratify New START
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2010
    • Confirm Elena Kagan
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2010
    • Stop EPA climate regs
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2010
    • Repeal don't ask, tell
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2010
    • Overturn Ledbetter
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Block release of TARP funds
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Pass $787 billion stimulus
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Repeal DC gun laws
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Confirm Sonia Sotomayor
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Pass health care bill
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Bar budget rules for climate bill
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Pass 2010 budget resolution
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Let judges adjust mortgages
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Allow FDA to regulate tobacco
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Protect gays from hate crimes
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Cut F-22 funds
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Label North Korea terrorist state
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Build Guantanamo replacement
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Allow federal funds for abortion
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Cap greenhouse gases
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2008
    • Bail out financial markets
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2008
    • Increase missile defense $
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2008
    • Overhaul FISA
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2008
    • Raise CAFE standards
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • Expand SCHIP
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • Make English official language
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
    • Path to citizenship
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • Fetus is unborn child
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
    • Prosecute hate crimes
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • Withdraw troops 3/08
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • Iran guard is terrorist group
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
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About Almanac
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The Almanac is a members-only database of searchable profiles compiled and adapted from the Almanac of American Politics. Comprehensive online profiles include biographical and political summaries of elected officials, campaign expenditures, voting records, interest-group ratings, and congressional staff look-ups. In-depth overviews of each state and house district are included as well, along with demographic data, analysis of voting trends, and political histories.
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