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Republican

Rep. Michael Burgess (R)

Michael Burgess Contact
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Email: n/a
DC Contact Information

Phone: 202-225-7772

Address: 2336 RHOB, DC 20515

State Office Contact Information

Phone: (972) 434-9700

Address: 1660 South Stemmons Freeway, Lewisville TX 75067-0600

Michael Burgess Staff
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Decker, James
Legislative Director
Decker, James
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Decker, James
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Lieberman, David
Legislative Counsel
Paluskiewicz, James
Deputy Chief of Staff
Lieberman, David
Legislative Counsel
Lieberman, David
Legislative Counsel
Decker, James
Legislative Director
Baker, James
Legislative Assistant
Decker, James
Legislative Director
Decker, James
Legislative Director
Decker, James
Legislative Director
Lieberman, David
Legislative Counsel
Lieberman, David
Legislative Counsel
Decker, James
Legislative Director
Paluskiewicz, James
Deputy Chief of Staff
Decker, James
Legislative Director
Lieberman, David
Legislative Counsel
Lieberman, David
Legislative Counsel
Lieberman, David
Legislative Counsel
Allen, Kathryn
Health Legislative Assistant; Congressional Health Caucus
Paluskiewicz, James
Deputy Chief of Staff
Lieberman, David
Legislative Counsel
Baker, James
Legislative Assistant
Lieberman, David
Legislative Counsel
Lieberman, David
Legislative Counsel
Lieberman, David
Legislative Counsel
Lieberman, David
Legislative Counsel
Lieberman, David
Legislative Counsel
Lieberman, David
Legislative Counsel
Paluskiewicz, James
Deputy Chief of Staff
Paluskiewicz, James
Deputy Chief of Staff
Allen, Kathryn
Health Legislative Assistant; Congressional Health Caucus
Paluskiewicz, James
Deputy Chief of Staff
Lieberman, David
Legislative Counsel
Decker, James
Legislative Director
Lieberman, David
Legislative Counsel
Lieberman, David
Legislative Counsel
Lieberman, David
Legislative Counsel
Lieberman, David
Legislative Counsel
Lieberman, David
Legislative Counsel
Baker, James
Legislative Assistant
Lieberman, David
Legislative Counsel
Paluskiewicz, James
Deputy Chief of Staff
Lieberman, David
Legislative Counsel
Lieberman, David
Legislative Counsel
Decker, James
Legislative Director
Lieberman, David
Legislative Counsel
Allen, Kathryn
Health Legislative Assistant; Congressional Health Caucus
Baker, James
Legislative Assistant
Brown, Sarah
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Decker, James
Legislative Director
Everett, Megan
Outreach Coordinator
Lieberman, David
Legislative Counsel
Loomis, Jane
Constituent Services Representative
Paluskiewicz, James
Deputy Chief of Staff
Self, Joan
Administrative Assistant
Shatzen Kerr, Jill
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Stevens, Amanda
Office Manager; Scheduler
Torres, Melanie
Director of Constituent Services
Vaughan, Robin
District Administrator
With, Erik
District Director
Vaughan, Robin
District Administrator
Self, Joan
Administrative Assistant
Shatzen Kerr, Jill
Communications Director
Everett, Megan
Outreach Coordinator
Lieberman, David
Legislative Counsel
Paluskiewicz, James
Deputy Chief of Staff
Torres, Melanie
Director of Constituent Services
With, Erik
District Director
Allen, Kathryn
Health Legislative Assistant; Congressional Health Caucus
Baker, James
Legislative Assistant
Decker, James
Legislative Director
Stevens, Amanda
Office Manager; Scheduler
Loomis, Jane
Constituent Services Representative
Stevens, Amanda
Office Manager; Scheduler
Brown, Sarah
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Michael Burgess Committees
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Michael Burgess Biography
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  • Elected: 2002, 6th term.
  • District: Texas 26
  • Born: Dec. 23, 1950, Rochester, MN
  • Home: Lewisville
  • Education:

    N. TX St. U., B.S. 1972, M.S. 1976, U. of TX Med. Schl., M.D. 1977, U. of TX Dallas, M.S. 2000

  • Professional Career:

    Practicing obstetrician, 1981-2003.

  • Ethnicity: White/Caucasian
  • Religion:

    Episcopalian

  • Family: Married (Laura); 3 children

Michael Burgess, a conservative Republican physician first elected in 2002, is a spokesman for House Republicans on health care issues. He also has close connections with former GOP presidential candidates—he was Arizona Sen. John McCain’s point person on health care policy in 2008 and encouraged former House Speaker Newt Gingrich to run in 2012. Read More

Michael Burgess, a conservative Republican physician first elected in 2002, is a spokesman for House Republicans on health care issues. He also has close connections with former GOP presidential candidates—he was Arizona Sen. John McCain’s point person on health care policy in 2008 and encouraged former House Speaker Newt Gingrich to run in 2012.

Burgess grew up in Denton County, the son of a physician, and graduated from the University of North Texas and the University of Texas Medical School in Houston. He trained at Parkland Hospital in Dallas and set up an obstetrics-gynecology practice in Lewisville. After 21 years in practice, Burgess decided to run for Congress, his first bid for elective office. When House Majority Leader Dick Armey announced in December 2001 that he would not run again, there was no doubt that a Republican would succeed him. But almost no one expected that the winner would be political novice Burgess. The widespread expectation was that the winner would be the majority leader’s son, Scott Armey, 32, a former Denton County judge.

In the primary, Armey outspent Burgess by more than 6-to-1. But turnout was light—only 25,000 people out of 456,000 voting-age residents took part. There were no Republican primary contests at the top of the ticket, and there didn’t seem to be much suspense about the outcome. Armey won 45% of the vote, which was not enough to avoid a runoff. Burgess won 23%. Then, in the four-week runoff campaign, Burgess benefited from a series of hard-hitting articles in the The Dallas Morning News about Scott Armey’s record as a county judge, which suggested he had used his position to steer county jobs and contracts to close friends, including a $1.5 million transportation consulting contract.

Burgess focused on health care and taxes. He had helped to draft the Texas Patients’ Bill of Rights and vowed to do the same on a national level. In another low-turnout affair, Burgess won 55%-45% in the runoff. Armey carried Collin and Tarrant counties, but tellingly lost 60%-40% in Denton County, where he was known best. After the runoff, his formerly powerful father spoke bitterly of the newspaper’s“vicious unprofessionalism” and accused the paper of a vendetta against the Armey family. In the general election, Burgess won 75%-23% over his Democrat opponent. He has been reelected comfortably since.

In the House, Burgess has a reliably conservative voting record. He joined the Tea Party Caucus when it formed in 2010. Also that year, he voted “present” on a resolution commemorating the 40th anniversary of the Vietnam-era shootings at Kent State University because he said the measure implied that the National Guard was at fault. He has for several years pushed legislation to implement a flat tax, a popular idea with conservatives that would replace the federal income tax with a 23% sales tax on goods and services. He drew headlines in August 2011 when, while attending a tea party meeting, he responded to a question about whether impeaching President Barack Obama would tie up Obama’s agenda by saying there was “no question” that it would. When a Fort Worth Star-Telegram reporter asked later about the comment, he said: “We need to tie things up. The longer we allow the damage to continue unchecked, the worse things are going to be for us.” But he said later that he didn’t advocate impeachment.

Burgess is best known for his work on health care issues, especially since he joined the Energy and Commerce Committee, which has broad jurisdiction over the medical industry. As vice chairman of its health subcommittee, he emerged as one of the most effective inquisitors during the health care hearings in 2011, and fellow Republicans regularly yielded him their extra time so he could ask pointed questions of Obama administration officials. He was especially vocal about seeking to fully defund the law in the fiscal 2011 budget, an idea that House Republican leaders sought to defuse. His nine-part plan for health care reform includes many of the ideas that successful GOP candidates espoused in the 2010 and 2012 elections, including allowing patients to shop for insurance across state lines and limiting damages in malpractice lawsuits. He also took an active role in subsequent Republican investigations into potential deals that the White House made with outside groups to pass the law.

But Burgess has shown that he is not a reflexive partisan. In the 111th Congress (2009-10), he was the lone Republican to vote with House Democrats to permanently fix the formula determining Medicare reimbursements for doctors. He also was part of a bipartisan group that introduced legislation in April 2011 ensuring that seniors who show signs of Alzheimer’s receive a formal diagnosis from their doctor. And in March 2009, he joined a bipartisan agreement to permit the Food and Drug Administration to approve generic versions of biologic drugs.

Burgess has made some inroads into the GOP leadership. He served as vice chairman of the Republican Policy Committee, which hammers out the party’s positions on issues. But he keeps his distance from the Texas GOP establishment. He and Rep. Ron Paul were the only two Texas Republicans to back Ted Cruz in Cruz’s successful Senate primary bid against Lt. Gov. David Dewhurst in 2012. And while other Lone Star State lawmakers were backing Gov. Rick Perry in that year’s presidential race, Burgess came out early for Gingrich. He told The Morning News that in late 2009, he wanted to find a Republican “who could possibly be on a stage with President Obama and articulate an alternative vision for the country in a concise and persuasive way.” So he went to see the former House speaker, whom he had befriended. “I said, ‘Sir, your country is calling you.’ It was a call to duty,” he recalled.

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Michael Burgess Election Results
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2012 General
Michael Burgess (R)
Votes: 176,642
Percent: 68.27%
David Sanchez
Votes: 74,237
Percent: 28.69%
Mark Boler
Votes: 7,844
Percent: 3.03%
2012 Primary
Michael Burgess (R)
Votes: 33,605
Percent: 100.0%
Prior Winning Percentages
2010 (67%), 2008 (60%), 2006 (60%), 2004 (66%), 2002 (75%)
Michael Burgess Votes and Bills
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National Journal’s rating system is an objective method of analyzing voting. The liberal score means that the lawmaker’s votes were more liberal than that percentage of his colleagues’ votes. The conservative score means his votes were more conservative than that percentage of his colleagues’ votes. The composite score is an average of a lawmaker’s six issue-based scores. See all NJ Voting

More Liberal
More Conservative
2013 2012 2011
Economic 13 (L) : 85 (C) 37 (L) : 63 (C) 34 (L) : 65 (C)
Social - (L) : 87 (C) - (L) : 91 (C) - (L) : 83 (C)
Foreign 46 (L) : 54 (C) 35 (L) : 59 (C) - (L) : 91 (C)
Composite 22.2 (L) : 77.8 (C) 26.5 (L) : 73.5 (C) 15.8 (L) : 84.2 (C)
Interest Group Ratings

The vote ratings by 10 special interest groups provide insight into a lawmaker’s general ideology and the degree to which he or she agrees with the group’s point of view. Two organizations provide just one combined rating for 2011 and 2012, the two sessions of the 112th Congress. They are the ACLU and the ITIC. About the interest groups.

20112012
FRC80100
LCV69
CFG8489
ITIC-58
NTU8485
20112012
COC93-
ACLU-0
ACU8396
ADA510
AFSCME0-
Key House Votes

The key votes show how a member of Congress voted on the major bills of the year. N indicates a "no" vote; Y a "yes" vote. If a member voted "present" or was absent, the bill caption is not shown. For a complete description of the bills included in key votes, see the Almanac's Guide to Usage.

    • Pass GOP budget
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • End fiscal cliff
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • Extend payroll tax cut
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • Find AG in contempt
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Stop student loan hike
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Repeal health care
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Raise debt limit
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Pass cut, cap, balance
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Defund Planned Parenthood
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Repeal lightbulb ban
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Add endangered listings
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Speed troop withdrawal
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Regulate financial firms
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2010
    • Pass tax cuts for some
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2010
    • Stop detainee transfers
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2010
    • Legalize immigrants' kids
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2010
    • Repeal don't ask, tell
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2010
    • Limit campaign funds
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2010
    • Overturn Ledbetter
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Pass $820 billion stimulus
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Let guns in national parks
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Pass cap-and-trade
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Bar federal abortion funds
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Pass health care bill
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Bail out financial markets
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2008
    • Repeal D.C. gun law
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2008
    • Overhaul FISA
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2008
    • Increase minimum wage
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • Expand SCHIP
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • Raise CAFE standards
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • Share immigration data
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
    • Foreign aid abortion ban
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
    • Ban gay bias in workplace
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • Withdraw troops 8/08
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • No operations in Iran
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • Free trade with Peru
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
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The Almanac is a members-only database of searchable profiles compiled and adapted from the Almanac of American Politics. Comprehensive online profiles include biographical and political summaries of elected officials, campaign expenditures, voting records, interest-group ratings, and congressional staff look-ups. In-depth overviews of each state and house district are included as well, along with demographic data, analysis of voting trends, and political histories.
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