Skip Navigation

Close and don't show again.

Your browser is out of date.

You may not get the full experience here on National Journal.

Please upgrade your browser to any of the following supported browsers:

Sherrod Brown Sherrod Brown

NEXT :
This ad will end in seconds
 
Close X

Want access to this content? Learn More »

Forget Your Password?

Don't have an account? Register »

Reveal Navigation
 

 

Almanac

Search

Enter your search query or use our Advanced People Search. Need Help? View our search tips

View Saved Lists
View Saved Lists
Democrat

Sen. Sherrod Brown (D)

Sherrod Brown Contact
Back to top
Email: n/a
DC Contact Information

Phone: 202-224-2315

Address: 713 HSOB, DC 20510

State Office Contact Information

Phone: (216) 522-7272

Address: 1301 East Ninth Street, Cleveland OH 44114

Cincinnati OH

Phone: (513) 684-1021

Fax: (513) 684-1029

Address: 425 Walnut Street, Cincinnati OH 45202

Columbus OH

Phone: (614) 469-2083

Fax: (614) 469-2171

Address: 200 North High Street, Columbus OH 43215

Lorain OH

Phone: (440) 242-4100

Fax: (440) 242-4108

Address: 200 West Erie Avenue, Lorain OH 44052

Sherrod Brown Staff
Back to top
Sort by INTEREST NAME TITLE
Duggan, Abigail
Legislative Assistant
Duggan, Abigail
Legislative Assistant
Crown, John
Legislative Correspondent
Duggan, Abigail
Legislative Assistant
Crown, John
Legislative Correspondent
Crown, John
Legislative Correspondent
Bragin, Gideon
Legislative Assistant
Swann, Adrian
Legislative Correspondent
Bragin, Gideon
Legislative Assistant
Houser, Elaina
Legislative Correspondent
Swann, Adrian
Legislative Correspondent
Johnson, Alex
Legislative Correspondent
Swann, Adrian
Legislative Correspondent
Crown, John
Legislative Correspondent
Swann, Adrian
Legislative Correspondent
Johnson, Alex
Legislative Correspondent
Swann, Adrian
Legislative Correspondent
Crown, John
Legislative Correspondent
Gokaldas, Anna
Legislative Assistant
Swann, Adrian
Legislative Correspondent
Swann, Adrian
Legislative Correspondent
Crown, John
Legislative Correspondent
Gokaldas, Anna
Legislative Assistant
Pechaitis, Laura
Constituent Services Liaison
Duggan, Abigail
Legislative Assistant
Crown, John
Legislative Correspondent
Crown, John
Legislative Correspondent
Gannon, Jesse
Economic Recovery Coordinator
Houser, Elaina
Legislative Correspondent
Johnson, Alex
Legislative Correspondent
Todd, Nora
Senior Policy Advisor
Crown, John
Legislative Correspondent
Gannon, Jesse
Economic Recovery Coordinator
Houser, Elaina
Legislative Correspondent
Johnson, Alex
Legislative Correspondent
Todd, Nora
Senior Policy Advisor
Hill, Leah
Legislative Correspondent
Duggan, Abigail
Legislative Assistant
Swann, Adrian
Legislative Correspondent
Crown, John
Legislative Correspondent
Crown, John
Legislative Correspondent
Houser, Elaina
Legislative Correspondent
Johnson, Alex
Legislative Correspondent
Todd, Nora
Senior Policy Advisor
Crown, John
Legislative Correspondent
Swann, Adrian
Legislative Correspondent
Crown, John
Legislative Correspondent
Crown, John
Legislative Correspondent
Gokaldas, Anna
Legislative Assistant
Johnson, Alex
Legislative Correspondent
Swann, Adrian
Legislative Correspondent
Johnson, Alex
Legislative Correspondent
Swann, Adrian
Legislative Correspondent
Duggan, Abigail
Legislative Assistant
Hart, Nikki
Legislative Correspondent
Crown, John
Legislative Correspondent
Gokaldas, Anna
Legislative Assistant
Houser, Elaina
Legislative Correspondent
Swann, Adrian
Legislative Correspondent
Crown, John
Legislative Correspondent
Swann, Adrian
Legislative Correspondent
Bragin, Gideon
Legislative Assistant
Hill, Leah
Legislative Correspondent
Johnson, Alex
Legislative Correspondent
Todd, Nora
Senior Policy Advisor
Crown, John
Legislative Correspondent
Crown, John
Legislative Correspondent
Gokaldas, Anna
Legislative Assistant
Crown, John
Legislative Correspondent
Gokaldas, Anna
Legislative Assistant
Bragin, Gideon
Legislative Assistant
Gannon, Jesse
Economic Recovery Coordinator
Johnson, Alex
Legislative Correspondent
Todd, Nora
Senior Policy Advisor
Swann, Adrian
Legislative Correspondent
Bragin, Gideon
Legislative Assistant
Gannon, Jesse
Economic Recovery Coordinator
Johnson, Alex
Legislative Correspondent
Todd, Nora
Senior Policy Advisor
Swann, Adrian
Legislative Correspondent
Swann, Adrian
Legislative Correspondent
Duggan, Abigail
Legislative Assistant
Duggan, Abigail
Legislative Assistant
Duggan, Abigail
Legislative Assistant
Hart, Nikki
Legislative Correspondent
Crown, John
Legislative Correspondent
Gokaldas, Anna
Legislative Assistant
Pechaitis, Laura
Constituent Services Liaison
Houser, Elaina
Legislative Correspondent
Crown, John
Legislative Correspondent
Bragin, Gideon
Legislative Assistant
Gannon, Jesse
Economic Recovery Coordinator
Johnson, Alex
Legislative Correspondent
Todd, Nora
Senior Policy Advisor
Crown, John
Legislative Correspondent
Crown, John
Legislative Correspondent
Swann, Adrian
Legislative Correspondent
Bragin, Gideon
Legislative Assistant
Johnson, Alex
Legislative Correspondent
Crown, John
Legislative Correspondent
Hill, Leah
Legislative Correspondent
Todd, Nora
Senior Policy Advisor
Duggan, Abigail
Legislative Assistant
Duggan, Abigail
Legislative Assistant
Hekhuis, Jeremy
Legislative Director
Johnson, Alex
Legislative Correspondent
Crown, John
Legislative Correspondent
Crown, John
Legislative Correspondent
Bragin, Gideon
Legislative Assistant
Johnson, Alex
Legislative Correspondent
Hill, Leah
Legislative Correspondent
Todd, Nora
Senior Policy Advisor
Swann, Adrian
Legislative Correspondent
Crown, John
Legislative Correspondent
Gokaldas, Anna
Legislative Assistant
Johnson, Alex
Legislative Correspondent
Todd, Nora
Senior Policy Advisor
Crown, John
Legislative Correspondent
Todd, Nora
Senior Policy Advisor
Crown, John
Legislative Correspondent
Crown, John
Legislative Correspondent
Pechaitis, Laura
Constituent Services Liaison
Duggan, Abigail
Legislative Assistant
Duggan, Abigail
Legislative Assistant
Baron, Diana
Executive Assistant; Scheduler
Bradley, Paul
Regional Representative
Bragin, Gideon
Legislative Assistant
Brown, Tommy
Staff Assistant
Crown, John
Legislative Correspondent
Deane, Bradley
Special Projects Coordinator
Dubyak, Meghan
Communications Director
Duggan, Abigail
Legislative Assistant
Gannon, Jesse
Economic Recovery Coordinator
Gilligan, Joe
Central Ohio Regional Director
Gokaldas, Anna
Legislative Assistant
Griffin, Ross
Staff Assistant
Hart, Nikki
Legislative Correspondent
Hekhuis, Jeremy
Legislative Director
Hill, Brooke
Southwest Regional Director
Hill, Leah
Legislative Correspondent
Holstein, Helene
Online Information and Technology Director
Houser, Elaina
Legislative Correspondent
Howard, David
Regional Representative
Johnson, Alex
Legislative Correspondent
Keyes, Matt
Special Projects Coordinator
Kulik, Lauren
Deputy Communications Director
Longsworth-Orr, Ann
Northwest Ohio Community Liaison
Lowry, Sarah
Northeast Ohio Regional Representative
Michael, Rahiel
Constituent Services Representative
Milete, Diana
Office Manager; Lead Caseworker
Molnar, Margaret
Constituent Services Liaison
Moore, Amber
Constituent Services Liaison
Oakes, Paulanne
Constituent Services Liaison
Patterson, John
Assistant Scheduler; Constituent Services Liaison
Pechaitis, Laura
Constituent Services Liaison
Rogala, Pat
Ohio Scheduler
Smith, Chadd
Regional Representative; Constituent Services Liaison
Swann, Adrian
Legislative Correspondent
Thames, Elizabeth
Deputy State Director
Todd, Nora
Senior Policy Advisor
Topolinski, Mary
Administrative Director
Turner, Meredith
Constituent Services Liaison
Wieder, Joseph
Constituent Services Liaison
Williamson, Kenneth
Constituent Services Liaison
Wilson, Jeanne
Appalachian Regional Representative
Young, Will
Community Liaison
Zorn, Stuart
Staff Assistant
Todd, Nora
Senior Policy Advisor
Patterson, John
Assistant Scheduler; Constituent Services Liaison
Milete, Diana
Office Manager; Lead Caseworker
Dubyak, Meghan
Communications Director
Deane, Bradley
Special Projects Coordinator
Gannon, Jesse
Economic Recovery Coordinator
Keyes, Matt
Special Projects Coordinator
Kulik, Lauren
Deputy Communications Director
Gilligan, Joe
Central Ohio Regional Director
Hill, Brooke
Southwest Regional Director
Holstein, Helene
Online Information and Technology Director
Thames, Elizabeth
Deputy State Director
Topolinski, Mary
Administrative Director
Baron, Diana
Executive Assistant; Scheduler
Bragin, Gideon
Legislative Assistant
Duggan, Abigail
Legislative Assistant
Gokaldas, Anna
Legislative Assistant
Crown, John
Legislative Correspondent
Hart, Nikki
Legislative Correspondent
Hill, Leah
Legislative Correspondent
Houser, Elaina
Legislative Correspondent
Johnson, Alex
Legislative Correspondent
Swann, Adrian
Legislative Correspondent
Hekhuis, Jeremy
Legislative Director
Longsworth-Orr, Ann
Northwest Ohio Community Liaison
Molnar, Margaret
Constituent Services Liaison
Moore, Amber
Constituent Services Liaison
Oakes, Paulanne
Constituent Services Liaison
Patterson, John
Assistant Scheduler; Constituent Services Liaison
Pechaitis, Laura
Constituent Services Liaison
Smith, Chadd
Regional Representative; Constituent Services Liaison
Turner, Meredith
Constituent Services Liaison
Wieder, Joseph
Constituent Services Liaison
Williamson, Kenneth
Constituent Services Liaison
Young, Will
Community Liaison
Milete, Diana
Office Manager; Lead Caseworker
Bradley, Paul
Regional Representative
Howard, David
Regional Representative
Lowry, Sarah
Northeast Ohio Regional Representative
Michael, Rahiel
Constituent Services Representative
Smith, Chadd
Regional Representative; Constituent Services Liaison
Wilson, Jeanne
Appalachian Regional Representative
Baron, Diana
Executive Assistant; Scheduler
Rogala, Pat
Ohio Scheduler
Brown, Tommy
Staff Assistant
Griffin, Ross
Staff Assistant
Zorn, Stuart
Staff Assistant
Note: You can only itemize lists in the Interests and Title sections
Save List
X

Your saved lists will appear under My Saved Lists on The Almanac's landing page.

Sherrod Brown Committees
Back to top
Sherrod Brown Biography
Back to top
  • Elected: 2006, term expires 2018, 2nd term.
  • State: Ohio
  • Born: Nov. 09, 1952, Mansfield
  • Home: Avon
  • Education:

    Yale U., B.A. 1974, OH St. U., M.A. 1979, M.A. 1981

  • Professional Career:

    Prof., OH St. U. at Mansfield, 1979, 1981, 1991.

  • Political Career:

    OH House, 1974-82; OH secy. of state, 1982-90, U.S. House, 1992-2006.

  • Ethnicity: White/Caucasian
  • Religion:

    Lutheran

  • Family: Married (Connie Schultz); 4 children

Democrat Sherrod Brown, Ohio’s senior senator, was first elected to the House in 1992 and to the Senate in 2006. He is an Ivy League graduate with two master’s degrees, but he is one of Congress’ most ardent defenders of the working class, in addition to being an adept campaigner who has twice beaten well-funded Republicans. He became the Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs Committee's top Democrat in 2015. Read More

Democrat Sherrod Brown, Ohio’s senior senator, was first elected to the House in 1992 and to the Senate in 2006. He is an Ivy League graduate with two master’s degrees, but he is one of Congress’ most ardent defenders of the working class, in addition to being an adept campaigner who has twice beaten well-funded Republicans. He became the Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs Committee's top Democrat in 2015.

Brown grew up in Mansfield, the son of a doctor, graduated from Yale in 1974, and won a seat in the state House later that year. He earned master’s degrees in education and public administration from the Ohio State University. Brown has spent more than half his life in public office. In 1982, when he was 29, he was elected Ohio secretary of state and worked to increase voter registration and turnout. In 1990, after serving two terms, he lost that office to Republican Bob Taft, who was later elected governor. In 1992, Brown ran for the open 13th District House seat. With solid labor support, he campaigned loud and hard against the North American Free Trade Agreement and championed universal health care. He won 53%-35%.

For many years, Brown wore a self-designed lapel pin of a canary in a cage, to commemorate underground miners who were at risk back in the days before labor unions and government safety inspections. He had a consistently liberal voting record in the House. On trade, he was one of the most voluble pro-labor and “fair-trade” members from the Great Lakes area, attacking the string of free trade agreements and policies that followed NAFTA in 1993. He sponsored bus trips to Canada for consumers to buy prescription drugs. He urged a ban on the use of antibiotics in farm animals, including penicillin and tetracycline. He called for enforcement of laws against importing goods made with slave labor in China and helped to increase funding for international programs to fight tuberculosis. He has authored the books Congress From the Inside and Myths of Free Trade.In 2007, his wife, syndicated columnist Connie Schultz, wrote And His Lovely Wife: A Memoir From the Woman Beside the Man about Brown’s 2006 campaign for Senate.

Brown long had had his eye on statewide office. In 2005, he at first said he would not challenge two-term Republican Sen. Mike DeWine, which left Iraq War veteran Paul Hackett as the Democratic front-runner. Hackett was an attractive candidate, but there were questions about whether he could raise enough money, and his shoot-from-the-hip style aroused concerns about how he would play statewide. Brown reconsidered and entered the race in October 2005. Although incensed at Brown, Hackett withdrew from the race, and Brown breezed to the Democratic nomination.

DeWine, meanwhile, won a lackluster 72% in the GOP primary against two little-known opponents, a reflection of conservative dissatisfaction with his votes on gun control and his role in the bipartisan compromise to end Senate filibusters on federal judicial nominees. DeWine also was running for reelection in an unusually hostile political environment for Ohio Republicans. There was an undertow from various scandals associated with the Republican-controlled state government, plus the drag from the unpopular Bush administration. Brown charged that DeWine was a “rubber stamp” for President George W. Bush and tied him to Bush’s Iraq policy. While Brown sought to nationalize the race, DeWine pursued a more localized approach. He focused on his accomplishments and his ability to work across party lines, hoping to heighten the contrast between himself and the more sharply partisan Brown, whose legislative effectiveness had been limited under Republican rule.

Despite being outspent $15 million to $10.7 million, Brown won 56%-44%, dominating nearly all of Ohio’s population centers. DeWine carried much of the state west of Interstate 75, where the tone is more Midwestern. Brown carried everything east of Interstate 77, where his high-profile opposition to free trade resonated in the coal and steel counties.

In the Senate, Brown is sometimes compared to Howard Metzenbaum, who spent nearly two decades as an Ohio Democratic senator fighting conservatives and big business and was known as “the last angry liberal.” Brown can be rhetorically combative; in a March 2011 floor speech, he likened the GOP’s push in some states to restrict collective-bargaining rights to the anti-union efforts of Adolf Hitler and Joseph Stalin, a remark for which he later apologized. But his style is also often cheerful and informal. He loves to chat about baseball, and he and Schultz visited Chicago’s Wrigley Field on their honeymoon. In addition to his fondness for wearing sneakers (American-made) with his suits, he is known for his voice, which sounds perpetually hoarse, and his mop of tousled hair that often looks in need of a comb. He also is known as an energetic cheerleader for his state, dropping the names of Ohio localities in his floor speeches, and he has amassed a solid constituent-service record.

Brown’s voting record has been as unfailingly liberal as it was in the House. His major focus has been on trade issues. A sign posted outside his Columbus campaign headquarters in 2012 read: “Only vehicles assembled by union workers in North America are welcome in this parking lot.” Early in 2009, Brown fought to include in the Democrats’ economic stimulus bill requirements that stimulus money be used on American-made goods. The provision was included in the bill that passed the House and Senate, but it was watered down to allow goods to be purchased from some of America’s largest trading partners.

In 2009, Brown called on President Barack Obama to take a tougher stance with China on trade, saying the White House should prod the Chinese government to allow its currency to float rather than keep it pegged to the dollar, which would have the effect of raising prices for Chinese goods. He led a subsequent effort in 2012 to try to persuade Obama to file a series of trade cases against China regarding the auto industry, accusing Beijing of unfairly subsidizing Chinese auto parts makers. He won a highly prized seat on the Finance Committee in 2013, enabling him to have an even bigger say on trade matters and providing a stark contrast to his home-state GOP colleague Rob Portman, also on the panel.

Brown says one of his proudest achievements in the Senate was a bill he passed with the help of the late liberal Sen. Edward Kennedy of Massachusetts. During reauthorization of the Food and Drug Administration in 2009, Brown won passage of an amendment creating incentives for drug companies to produce drugs for diseases common in the developing world. Within weeks of it going into effect, an international aid group reported a flood of new TB drugs on the market. He also added provisions to a prescription drug user fee bill that became law in 2012 that were aimed at addressing shortages of critical cancer drugs and other life-saving medications.

As a liberal from a coal-producing state, Brown is a key swing Democrat on environmental issues. In early 2011, when Obama announced that the Environmental Protection Agency would issue new regulations for carbon emissions, Brown said he would insist on protections for U.S. manufacturers. A few months later, he was one of just seven senators to support Michigan Democratic Sen. Debbie Stabenow’s failed amendment to suspend EPA regulation of carbon and other greenhouse gas emissions for two years. Brown was also a negotiator on the climate change bill that the Senate worked on in 2010 but failed to pass. He was the point man for a bloc of Democrats who dubbed themselves the “Brown Dogs” and refused to support a bill without robust protections for U.S. firms. Brown surprised environmental groups in 2007 when he said nuclear power is safe and should be an option for the country. More recently, he has worked to make Ohio a leader in wind energy production.

On the Banking Committee, Brown worked on the financial industry regulation bill in 2010 and tried unsuccessfully to pass a proposal to limit the size of banks in light of the $700 billion government bailout of financial firms deemed “too big to fail.” He called for capping banks so they cannot hold more than 2% of the national gross domestic product or 10% of total insured bank deposits nationally. The cap would have affected three large banks: Bank of America, Wells Fargo, and JP Morgan Chase. He joined with conservative Louisiana Republican Sen. David Vitter in 2012 to argue for tougher rules on bank capital reserves, the cushion that financial institutions must keep against losses.

Brown was a proponent of a government-run insurance option in the Democrats’ health care overhaul. When the public option was dropped because it would have sunk the bill, Brown voted for the legislation anyway, saying it at least contained “good insurance reform.” Later in the year, he opposed Obama’s deal to allow the Bush-era tax cuts to continue even for the top income-earners, but wound up voting for final passage because the legislation also extended unemployment benefits for 13 months. “My principle of not wanting tax cuts for the rich doesn’t help an unemployed worker,” he told Politico. He supported the January 2013 tax and spending deal to avoid a so-called “fiscal cliff,” saying it “reduces the deficit by asking millionaires and billionaires to pay their fair share.”

In the 2012 election, Brown was the target of the most expensive outside effort ever to defeat a member of Congress. Conservative groups poured $40 million into attacking him, with strategist Karl Rove’s Crossroads GPS responsible for $12 million of that. His Republican opponent was 35-year-old Josh Mandel, who broke his earlier pledge to serve a full term as state treasurer by challenging Brown less than two years into his tenure. Mandel raised $19 million on his own and served up plenty of stinging rhetoric, calling Brown’s support for the auto industry bailout “un-American” and labeling the senator “a liar” during a debate.

Brown and his allies accused Mandel of not being ready for the Senate, pointing to his statements that fact-checking watchdogs labeled as false. The senator called his rival “the king” of “Pants on Fires,” a reference to the website PolitiFact’s lowest rating for truthfulness. Brown’s campaign and outside liberal groups came up with $35 million, and—boosted by Obama’s substantial political investment in Ohio—turned what was a neck-and-neck race in August into a 51%-45% win. Mandel won most of the state’s counties, but Brown dominated populous and urban Northeast Ohio, getting 69% in Cleveland’s Cuyahoga County and 61% in Columbus’ Franklin County.

Show Less
Sherrod Brown Election Results
Back to top
2012 General
Sherrod Brown (D)
Votes: 2,762,690
Percent: 50.7%
Josh Mandel (R)
Votes: 2,435,712
Percent: 44.7%
Scott Rupert (I)
Votes: 250,616
Percent: 4.6%
2012 Primary
Sherrod Brown (D)
Votes: 522,827
Percent: 100.0%
Prior Winning Percentages
2006 (56%); House: 2004 (67%), 2002 (69%), 2000 (65%), 1998 (62%), 1996 (60%), 1994 (49%), 1992 (53%)
Sherrod Brown Votes and Bills
Back to top NJ Vote Ratings

National Journal’s rating system is an objective method of analyzing voting. The liberal score means that the lawmaker’s votes were more liberal than that percentage of his colleagues’ votes. The conservative score means his votes were more conservative than that percentage of his colleagues’ votes. The composite score is an average of a lawmaker’s six issue-based scores. See all NJ Voting

More Liberal
More Conservative
2013 2012 2011
Economic 75 (L) : 19 (C) 86 (L) : 10 (C) 81 (L) : 12 (C)
Social 73 (L) : - (C) 64 (L) : - (C) 52 (L) : - (C)
Foreign 71 (L) : - (C) 85 (L) : - (C) 92 (L) : - (C)
Composite 83.3 (L) : 16.7 (C) 87.5 (L) : 12.5 (C) 85.5 (L) : 14.5 (C)
Interest Group Ratings

The vote ratings by 10 special interest groups provide insight into a lawmaker’s general ideology and the degree to which he or she agrees with the group’s point of view. Two organizations provide just one combined rating for 2011 and 2012, the two sessions of the 112th Congress. They are the ACLU and the ITIC. About the interest groups.

20112012
FRC140
LCV9193
CFG010
ITIC-63
NTU69
20112012
COC45-
ACLU-75
ACU00
ADA95100
AFSCME100-
Key Senate Votes

The key votes show how a member of Congress voted on the major bills of the year. N indicates a "no" vote; Y a "yes" vote. If a member voted "present" or was absent, the bill caption is not shown. For a complete description of the bills included in key votes, see the Almanac's Guide to Usage.

    • End fiscal cliff
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Block faith exemptions
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Approve gas pipeline
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • Approve farm bill
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Let cyber bill proceed
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Block Gitmo transfers
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • Raise debt limit
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Pass balanced budget amendment
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Stop EPA climate regulations
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Proceed to Cordray vote
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Require talking filibuster
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Limit Fannie/Freddie
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Regulate financial firms
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2010
    • Pass tax cuts for some
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2010
    • Legalize immigrants' kids
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2010
    • Ratify New START
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2010
    • Confirm Elena Kagan
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2010
    • Stop EPA climate regs
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2010
    • Repeal don't ask, tell
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2010
    • Overturn Ledbetter
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Block release of TARP funds
    • Vote:
    • Year: 2009
    • Pass $787 billion stimulus
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Repeal DC gun laws
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Confirm Sonia Sotomayor
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Pass health care bill
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Bar budget rules for climate bill
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Pass 2010 budget resolution
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Let judges adjust mortgages
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Allow FDA to regulate tobacco
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Protect gays from hate crimes
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Cut F-22 funds
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Label North Korea terrorist state
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Build Guantanamo replacement
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Allow federal funds for abortion
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Cap greenhouse gases
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2008
    • Bail out financial markets
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2008
    • Increase missile defense $
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2008
    • Overhaul FISA
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2008
    • Raise CAFE standards
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
    • Expand SCHIP
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
    • Make English official language
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • Path to citizenship
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • Fetus is unborn child
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • Prosecute hate crimes
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
    • Withdraw troops 3/08
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
    • Iran guard is terrorist group
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
Read More
 
Browse The Almanac
Congressional Leadership
and Committees

House Committees
Senate Committees
Joint Committees
Leadership Roster
About Almanac
almanac cover
The Almanac is a members-only database of searchable profiles compiled and adapted from the Almanac of American Politics. Comprehensive online profiles include biographical and political summaries of elected officials, campaign expenditures, voting records, interest-group ratings, and congressional staff look-ups. In-depth overviews of each state and house district are included as well, along with demographic data, analysis of voting trends, and political histories.
Members: Buy the book at 25% off retail.
Order Now
Need Help?

Contact Us:

202.266.7900 | membership@nationaljournal.com