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Democrat

Rep. Corrine Brown (D)

Corrine Brown Contact
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Email: n/a
DC Contact Information

Phone: 202-225-0123

Address: 2111 RHOB, DC 20515

State Office Contact Information

Phone: (904) 354-1652

Address: 101 East Union Street, Jacksonville FL 32202-6002

Orlando FL

Phone: (407) 872-2208

Fax: (407) 872-5763

Address: 445 North Garland Avenue, Orlando FL 32801-1518

Corrine Brown Staff
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Sort by INTEREST NAME TITLE
Simon, David
Communications Director
Footer, Lee
Senior Legislative Assistant
Martinelli, Nick
Legislative Director
Footer, Lee
Senior Legislative Assistant
Simon, David
Communications Director
Footer, Lee
Senior Legislative Assistant
Footer, Lee
Senior Legislative Assistant
Martinelli, Nick
Legislative Director
Footer, Lee
Senior Legislative Assistant
Footer, Lee
Senior Legislative Assistant
Martinelli, Nick
Legislative Director
Anim-Yankah, Stephanie
Senior Congressional Aide
Footer, Lee
Senior Legislative Assistant
Simon, David
Communications Director
Anim-Yankah, Stephanie
Senior Congressional Aide
Footer, Lee
Senior Legislative Assistant
Simon, David
Communications Director
Footer, Lee
Senior Legislative Assistant
Footer, Lee
Senior Legislative Assistant
Footer, Lee
Senior Legislative Assistant
Simon, David
Communications Director
Footer, Lee
Senior Legislative Assistant
Footer, Lee
Senior Legislative Assistant
Simon, David
Communications Director
Simon, David
Communications Director
Simon, David
Communications Director
Footer, Lee
Senior Legislative Assistant
Martinelli, Nick
Legislative Director
Simon, David
Communications Director
Martinelli, Nick
Legislative Director
Simon, David
Communications Director
Simon, David
Communications Director
Footer, Lee
Senior Legislative Assistant
Footer, Lee
Senior Legislative Assistant
Simon, David
Communications Director
Simon, David
Communications Director
Simon, David
Communications Director
Footer, Lee
Senior Legislative Assistant
Simon, David
Communications Director
Footer, Lee
Senior Legislative Assistant
Simon, David
Communications Director
Simon, David
Communications Director
Martinelli, Nick
Legislative Director
Footer, Lee
Senior Legislative Assistant
Footer, Lee
Senior Legislative Assistant
Simon, David
Communications Director
Footer, Lee
Senior Legislative Assistant
Simon, David
Communications Director
Simon, David
Communications Director
Footer, Lee
Senior Legislative Assistant
Simon, David
Communications Director
Martinelli, Nick
Legislative Director
Footer, Lee
Senior Legislative Assistant
Simon, David
Communications Director
Footer, Lee
Senior Legislative Assistant
Martinelli, Nick
Legislative Director
Simon, David
Communications Director
Martinelli, Nick
Legislative Director
Footer, Lee
Senior Legislative Assistant
Simon, David
Communications Director
Footer, Lee
Senior Legislative Assistant
Footer, Lee
Senior Legislative Assistant
Martinelli, Nick
Legislative Director
Footer, Lee
Senior Legislative Assistant
Simon, David
Communications Director
Footer, Lee
Senior Legislative Assistant
Simon, David
Communications Director
Footer, Lee
Senior Legislative Assistant
Simon, David
Communications Director
Footer, Lee
Senior Legislative Assistant
Footer, Lee
Senior Legislative Assistant
Footer, Lee
Senior Legislative Assistant
Simon, David
Communications Director
Simon, David
Communications Director
Martinelli, Nick
Legislative Director
Footer, Lee
Senior Legislative Assistant
Martinelli, Nick
Legislative Director
Simon, David
Communications Director
Footer, Lee
Senior Legislative Assistant
Martinelli, Nick
Legislative Director
Anim-Yankah, Stephanie
Senior Congressional Aide
Bowden, Glenel
District Director
Bryant, Hope
Congressional Aide
Chatman, Carolyn
Director of Outreach
Footer, Lee
Senior Legislative Assistant
Gass, Cathy
Scheduler; Executive Assistant
Glover, Chester
Congressional Caseworker
Hardy, Donna
Congressional Aide
Martinelli, Nick
Legislative Director
Pinckney, Janna
Systems Administrator
Sanders, Ronita
District Manager
Simon, David
Communications Director
Smith, Alice
Congressional Aide
Pinckney, Janna
Systems Administrator
Anim-Yankah, Stephanie
Senior Congressional Aide
Bryant, Hope
Congressional Aide
Hardy, Donna
Congressional Aide
Smith, Alice
Congressional Aide
Glover, Chester
Congressional Caseworker
Simon, David
Communications Director
Bowden, Glenel
District Director
Chatman, Carolyn
Director of Outreach
Gass, Cathy
Scheduler; Executive Assistant
Footer, Lee
Senior Legislative Assistant
Martinelli, Nick
Legislative Director
Sanders, Ronita
District Manager
Gass, Cathy
Scheduler; Executive Assistant
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Corrine Brown Committees
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Corrine Brown Biography
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  • Elected: 1992, 11th term.
  • District: Florida 5
  • Born: Nov. 11, 1946, Jacksonville
  • Home: Jacksonville
  • Education:

    FL A&M, B.S. 1969, M.S., 1971

  • Professional Career:

    Prof., FL Commun. Col., 1977–82, Guidance counselor, 1982–92.

  • Political Career:

    FL House of Reps., 1982–92.

  • Ethnicity: Black/African American
  • Religion:

    Baptist

  • Family: Single; 1 children

Corrine Brown, a Democrat first elected in 1992, uses the slogan “Corrine Delivers” in her reelection campaigns, and it is her ability to provide money and other help to her financially ailing district that has kept her in office despite a string of controversial comments and ethics issues. Read More

Corrine Brown, a Democrat first elected in 1992, uses the slogan “Corrine Delivers” in her reelection campaigns, and it is her ability to provide money and other help to her financially ailing district that has kept her in office despite a string of controversial comments and ethics issues.

She grew up in Jacksonville, taught at a community college, was a guidance counselor, and in 1982, was elected to the Florida House. When she ran for the House in the 1992 Democratic primary, she faced white talk-radio host Andy Johnson, who called himself “the blackest candidate in the race.” But her political base in Jacksonville carried Brown to a lead of 43%-31% in the first round of balloting, and 64%-36% in the runoff. She easily prevailed in the general election 59%-41%.

Brown has compiled a liberal record on most issues. In her district, many voters work at military bases and she tends to support high defense spending and argues that the military can be a source of opportunity. She added an amendment to the fiscal year 2013 defense authorization bill to have the Army Corps of Engineers improve a section of the Port of Jacksonville to bolster ship navigation there. On the Veterans’ Affairs Committee, she sought additional veterans’ cemeteries for Florida, which is the home to more veterans than any other state except California. New cemeteries were approved for Jacksonville and Sarasota in 2003.

On the Transportation and Infrastructure Subcommittee, Brown worked on legislation to strengthen security at the ports. A project of hers has been a high-speed rail line from Tampa to Orlando and Miami, something that many Republicans oppose. In 2012, she also accused her Florida GOP colleague John Mica, the panel’s chairman, of being on “a holy jihad” to “destroy” Amtrak. She was eligible to become Veterans’ Affairs’ top Democrat in 2013, but opted to let Maine’s Mike Michaud take the job so she could keep the same post on Transportation’s railroads subcommittee.

Brown’s outspoken, partisan views cause her problems at times. In 2004, she criticized Bush administration representatives at a briefing on the Haiti crisis, saying that they were “a bunch of white men” who “all look alike to me.” After Rep. Henry Bonilla, R-Texas, called her on her remarks, Brown apologized, but she continued to say she thought White House policy on Haiti was racist. In a dispute in 2008 over the seating of convention delegates from Florida, Brown, who had endorsed Hillary Rodham Clinton for president, said, “If we are not seated, then nobody is going to be seated.” The problem was resolved after Barack Obama became the certain nominee. In Washingtonian magazine’s anonymous 2012 survey of Capitol Hill staffers, she was named the “least eloquent” House member.

Brown has had spirited campaign opposition, resulting largely from personal issues. A Washington-based fundraising firm filed suit against her in March 2011, claiming she owed $45,000 in unpaid bills. Brown subsequently agreed to a settlement in which she paid back the money plus some expenses. Her most difficult contests came amid charges of questionable ethical conduct. In June of 1998, The St. Petersburg Times reported that Brown’s daughter had been given a $50,000 Lexus car by agents of African millionaire Foutanga Sissoko. He had been imprisoned in Miami on federal charges of paying an illegal gratuity to a Customs Service officer, and Brown worked furiously to get him released, lobbying Attorney General Janet Reno to have him deported to Africa to continue his humanitarian work. The newspaper also reported that Brown kept a jazz singer on her payroll as a “congressional outreach specialist.” Brown reacted with fury, filing a criminal contempt charge against the Times reporters with the Capitol Police, claiming they “accosted” her and their questions made her cry. The charges went nowhere. A subsequent investigation into the Sissoko matter by the House Ethics Committee found that Brown “demonstrated, at the least, poor judgment and created substantial concerns regarding both the appearance of impropriety and the reputation of the House.” The panel dropped the case because, committee members said, they were unable to question key witnesses, including Sissoko.

But the story had political repercussions for Brown. The Republicans in 1998 found a credible challenger in Bill Randall, an African-American and a former General Motors manager who had become a minister. He opposed abortion rights and favored local control of schools and government vouchers for private school tuition. He held Brown to 55%, getting 45% of the vote.

Two years later, she faced a vigorous reelection challenge from Republican Jennifer Carroll, a retired 20-year Navy officer who criticized Brown for an inability to work with people. She also outspent Brown. The incumbent called Carroll “a zero” and “a Republican puppet.” With a strong grass-roots organization, Brown won 58%-42%. In 2002, Carroll again challenged Brown. But local Republicans were not enthusiastic about her candidacy in the heavily Democratic district and Brown again prevailed, 59%-41%, again with huge leads in Jacksonville and Orlando. She has been unopposed or won with ease since then. In 2010, former Florida GOP Chairman Tom Slade shared with The Florida Times-Union his advice for any would-be challengers: “Don’t do it. Go find a tree and beat your head against it. You may find the result more pleasurable.”

Despite the ease with which she has been reelected, Brown in 2011 joined Florida Republican Mario Diaz-Balart in filing a legal challenge to the state’s voter-approved Fair District amendment calling for congressional districts to be drawn more compactly and to be impartial with regard to political party. The lawmakers said it would have a negative impact on minority voters. The suit angered Florida Democrats and longtime allies such as the NAACP who had pushed for Fair Districts and who called the challenge selfish. But Republicans ended up leaving her district fairly unchanged in post-2010-census redistricting.

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Corrine Brown Election Results
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2012 General
Corrine Brown (D)
Votes: 190,472
Percent: 70.77%
LeAnne Kolb (R)
Votes: 70,700
Percent: 26.27%
Eileen Fleming (NPA)
Votes: 7,978
Percent: 2.96%
2012 Primary
Corrine Brown (D)
Unopposed
Prior Winning Percentages
2010 (63%), 2008 (100%), 2006 (100%), 2004 (100%), 2002 (59%), 2000 (58%), 1998 (55%), 1996 (61%), 1994 (58%), 1992 (59%)
Corrine Brown Votes and Bills
Back to top NJ Vote Ratings

National Journal’s rating system is an objective method of analyzing voting. The liberal score means that the lawmaker’s votes were more liberal than that percentage of his colleagues’ votes. The conservative score means his votes were more conservative than that percentage of his colleagues’ votes. The composite score is an average of a lawmaker’s six issue-based scores. See all NJ Voting

More Liberal
More Conservative
2013 2012 2011
Economic 85 (L) : 14 (C) 82 (L) : 18 (C) 80 (L) : 18 (C)
Social 85 (L) : 13 (C) 85 (L) : - (C) 70 (L) : 30 (C)
Foreign 68 (L) : 31 (C) 62 (L) : 37 (C) 70 (L) : 28 (C)
Composite 80.0 (L) : 20.0 (C) 79.0 (L) : 21.0 (C) 74.0 (L) : 26.0 (C)
Interest Group Ratings

The vote ratings by 10 special interest groups provide insight into a lawmaker’s general ideology and the degree to which he or she agrees with the group’s point of view. Two organizations provide just one combined rating for 2011 and 2012, the two sessions of the 112th Congress. They are the ACLU and the ITIC. About the interest groups.

20112012
FRC1016
LCV9180
CFG1317
ITIC-55
NTU108
20112012
COC19-
ACLU-69
ACU88
ADA9080
AFSCME100-
Key House Votes

The key votes show how a member of Congress voted on the major bills of the year. N indicates a "no" vote; Y a "yes" vote. If a member voted "present" or was absent, the bill caption is not shown. For a complete description of the bills included in key votes, see the Almanac's Guide to Usage.

    • Pass GOP budget
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • End fiscal cliff
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Stop student loan hike
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • Repeal health care
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • Raise debt limit
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Pass cut, cap, balance
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Defund Planned Parenthood
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Repeal lightbulb ban
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Add endangered listings
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Speed troop withdrawal
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Regulate financial firms
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2010
    • Pass tax cuts for some
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2010
    • Stop detainee transfers
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2010
    • Legalize immigrants' kids
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2010
    • Repeal don't ask, tell
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2010
    • Limit campaign funds
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2010
    • Overturn Ledbetter
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Pass $820 billion stimulus
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Let guns in national parks
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Pass cap-and-trade
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Bar federal abortion funds
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Pass health care bill
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Bail out financial markets
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2008
    • Repeal D.C. gun law
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2008
    • Overhaul FISA
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2008
    • Increase minimum wage
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
    • Expand SCHIP
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
    • Raise CAFE standards
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
    • Share immigration data
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • Foreign aid abortion ban
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • Ban gay bias in workplace
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
    • Withdraw troops 8/08
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
    • No operations in Iran
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
    • Free trade with Peru
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
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The Almanac is a members-only database of searchable profiles compiled and adapted from the Almanac of American Politics. Comprehensive online profiles include biographical and political summaries of elected officials, campaign expenditures, voting records, interest-group ratings, and congressional staff look-ups. In-depth overviews of each state and house district are included as well, along with demographic data, analysis of voting trends, and political histories.
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