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Republican

Sen. John Hoeven (R)

John Hoeven Contact
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Email: n/a
DC Contact Information

Phone: 202-224-2551

Address: 338 RSOB, DC 20510

State Office Contact Information

Phone: (701) 250-4618

Address: 220 East Rosser Avenue, Bismarck ND 58501

Fargo ND

Phone: (701) 239-5389

Fax: (701) 239-5112

Address: 1802 32nd Avenue South, Fargo ND 58103

Grand Forks ND

Phone: (701) 746-8972

Fax: (701) 746-9122

Address: 102 North Fourth Street, Grand Forks ND 58201

Minot ND

Phone: (701) 838-1361

Fax: (701) 838-1381

Address: 315 Main Street, South, Minot ND 58701

Williston ND

Phone: (701) 580-4535

Address: 2006 Dublin Lane, Williston ND 58801

John Hoeven Staff
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Bladow, Cassie
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Carter, Josh
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Cleary, Sean
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Tryon, Emily
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Cleary, Sean
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Rustvang, Jeffrey
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Tryon, Emily
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Bladow, Cassie
Legislative Aide
Rustvang, Jeffrey
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Carter, Josh
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Brown, Shannon
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Tryon, Emily
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Carter, Josh
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Finken, Alex
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Tryon, Emily
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Cleary, Sean
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Tryon, Emily
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Brown, Shannon
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Cleary, Sean
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Brown, Shannon
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Cleary, Sean
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Brown, Shannon
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Carter, Josh
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Tryon, Emily
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Bladow, Cassie
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Rustvang, Jeffrey
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Tryon, Emily
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Brown, Shannon
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Cleary, Sean
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Bladow, Cassie
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Cleary, Sean
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Cleary, Sean
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Tryon, Emily
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Brown, Shannon
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Bladow, Cassie
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Brown, Shannon
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Cleary, Sean
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Finken, Alex
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Bladow, Cassie
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Tryon, Emily
Legislative Assistant
Carter, Josh
Legislative Assistant
Bladow, Cassie
Legislative Aide
Rustvang, Jeffrey
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Rustvang, Jeffrey
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Brown, Shannon
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Cleary, Sean
Legislative Correspondent
Cleary, Sean
Legislative Correspondent
Tryon, Emily
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Aafedt, Alexia
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Velk, Jackie
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Ewing, Jennifer
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Brown, Shannon
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Tryon, Emily
Legislative Assistant
Cleary, Sean
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Rustvang, Jeffrey
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Eberhard, Tony
Legislative Director
Moen, Eric
Correspondence Manager
Wehri, Eileen
State Office Manager
Egeland, Sara
Press Secretary
Dohrmann, Becky
Constituent Services Representative
Johnson, Sally
Constituent Services Representative
Rauser, Monty
Constituent Services Representative
Aafedt, Alexia
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Ewing, Jennifer
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Finken, Alex
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John Hoeven Committees
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John Hoeven Biography
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  • Elected: 2010, term expires 2016, 1st term.
  • State: North Dakota
  • Born: Mar. 13, 1957, Bismarck
  • Home: Bismarck
  • Education:

    Dartmouth, B.A. 1979; Northwestern U., Kellogg Grad. Schl., M.B.A. 1981

  • Professional Career:

    Exec. V.P., First Western Bank, 1986-93; pres. & CEO, Bank of ND, 1993-2000.

  • Political Career:

    ND gov. 2000-10.

  • Ethnicity: White/Caucasian
  • Religion:

    Catholic

  • Family: Married (Mikey); 2 children

North Dakota’s senior senator is Republican John Hoeven, a former governor who was elected in 2010 to succeed retiring Democratic Sen. Byron Dorgan. Read More

North Dakota’s senior senator is Republican John Hoeven, a former governor who was elected in 2010 to succeed retiring Democratic Sen. Byron Dorgan.

Hoeven (HO-ven) was born in Bismarck and grew up in Minot. His father was a banker who in 1969 took over the First Western Bank & Trust of Minot, which became a family business. John Hoeven started working there as a bookkeeper at age 15. He graduated from Dartmouth College and went on to earn an M.B.A. from Northwestern University. In 1981, he returned home to become First Western Bank’s executive vice president. In 1993, he was chosen to head the state-owned Bank of North Dakota—a creation of the democratic-socialist Nonpartisan League—by a board that included his predecessor as governor, Republican Ed Schafer, and also Attorney General Heidi Heitkamp, now the state’s junior senator. Under Hoeven’s stewardship, the bank’s worth rose from $990 million to $1.6 billion, and its loan portfolio increased from $200 million to $1 billion.

In 2000, after Schafer retired as governor, Hoeven ran for the post against Heitkamp. He cited his work attracting and retaining local jobs and organizing the effort to keep Minot Air Force Base off the government’s base closure list. He called for economic development in the state with an emphasis on the technology industry and on improving education, and he pledged more money for teacher training and salaries. He won 55% to 45%.

As governor, Hoeven used North Dakota’s burgeoning state revenues to fund programs to stimulate economic development. In his first years, he combined several state agencies into a Commerce Department. In 2002, he announced an ambitious research and development program, borrowing $50 million for university projects to help commercialize new technology. From 2005 to 2007, more than $40 million in state funds and double that amount in private funds were invested in the Center of Excellence in Life Sciences and Advanced Technologies and other research centers devoted to developing technology.

Much of this was aimed at exploiting North Dakota’s considerable energy resources, including oil, coal, ethanol, wind, and hydrogen. In 2002, Hoeven announced his EmPower North Dakota energy plan, aiming to build three new biodiesel plants by 2015 and to have wind supply 10% of the state’s electricity by 2015 (up from 5%). In 2004, Hoeven was reelected, capturing 71% of the vote to former state Sen. Joseph Satrom’s 27%. In 2005 and 2007, Hoeven submitted budgets with reductions in local property taxes and big increases in education spending that targeted raising teachers’ salaries.

National Republicans had hoped that Hoeven would run against one of North Dakota’s two Democratic senators. He opted not to challenge Sen. Kent Conrad in 2006 and, in November 2008, won another term by easily defeating state Sen. Tim Mathern. Before the 2008 election, Hoeven brushed aside speculation that he would run against Dorgan or Rep. Earl Pomeroy in 2010, but did not pledge to serve out his third term. In January 2010, he entered the Senate race, criticizing President Barack Obama’s economic agenda and what he called an overly bureaucratic health care overhaul. “Washington’s approach is to put a 2,000-page bill between you and your doctor,” he said.

He didn’t have to campaign very hard. The Democrats barely put up a fight against a governor with an 80% approval rating in a state that had moved solidly to the GOP in recent elections. The Democratic nominee was Tracy Potter, a state senator from Bismarck who struggled to raise money and get momentum. Hoeven spent $3 million on the campaign; Potter spent $28,000. He won easily, 76% to 22%.

As a freshman senator, Hoeven continued his focus on energy issues. He was an outspoken critic of Obama’s decision to block construction of the Keystone XL oil pipeline expected to run from Canada to the Gulf Coast. In March 2012, Hoeven offered a bill to reinstate the project. Though 11 Democrats crossed over to support the bill, it still failed to reach the 60-vote barrier to end a threatened filibuster.

As a member of the Senate Agriculture Committee, Hoeven supported the farm bill re-authorization that passed the Senate in June 2012. The bill ended direct payments to farmers but included a new form of crop insurance favored by farm-state senators outside of the South. Hoeven worked with Sen. Saxby Chambliss, R-Ga., to stop a proposal to eliminate target prices, which serve as a safety net when market prices drop. However, a final farm bill was eventually pushed off until 2013.

Despite his conservative views, Hoeven is not a free market absolutist. After Hurricane Irene hit the East Coast in the summer of 2011, he was one of 10 Republicans to support a $6.9 billion increase in Federal Emergency Management Agency funding. When the Souris River flooded his hometown of Minot, Hoeven supported more than $1 billion in federal disaster aid for the area. He showed a willingness to cross party lines when he joined 14 other Republicans to vote for a reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act in April 2012. In early 2013, Hoeven was one of just 12 Republicans to vote for a successful measure to raise the limit on how much debt the government can acquire. In the early months of 2013, Hoeven expressed support for the idea of bipartisan immigration reform being pushed by Sens. Marco Rubio, R-Fla. and John McCain, R-Ariz.

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John Hoeven Election Results
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2010 General
John Hoeven (R)
Votes: 181,689
Percent: 76.08%
Spent: $3,801,481
Tracy Potter
Votes: 52,955
Percent: 22.17%
Spent: $103,569
2010 Primary
John Hoeven (R)
Votes: 65,075
Percent: 100.0%
Prior Winning Percentages
Governor: 2008 (74%), 2004 (71%), 2000 (55%)
John Hoeven Votes and Bills
Back to top NJ Vote Ratings

National Journal’s rating system is an objective method of analyzing voting. The liberal score means that the lawmaker’s votes were more liberal than that percentage of his colleagues’ votes. The conservative score means his votes were more conservative than that percentage of his colleagues’ votes. The composite score is an average of a lawmaker’s six issue-based scores. See all NJ Voting

More Liberal
More Conservative
2013 2012 2011
Economic 40 (L) : 58 (C) 40 (L) : 59 (C) 39 (L) : 60 (C)
Social 21 (L) : 77 (C) 36 (L) : 63 (C) 17 (L) : 81 (C)
Foreign 28 (L) : 70 (C) 35 (L) : 62 (C) 37 (L) : 61 (C)
Composite 30.7 (L) : 69.3 (C) 37.8 (L) : 62.2 (C) 31.8 (L) : 68.2 (C)
Interest Group Ratings

The vote ratings by 10 special interest groups provide insight into a lawmaker’s general ideology and the degree to which he or she agrees with the group’s point of view. Two organizations provide just one combined rating for 2011 and 2012, the two sessions of the 112th Congress. They are the ACLU and the ITIC. About the interest groups.

20112012
FRC7171
LCV021
CFG6642
ITIC-100
NTU7448
20112012
COC100-
ACLU-25
ACU8048
ADA1530
AFSCME0-
Key Senate Votes

The key votes show how a member of Congress voted on the major bills of the year. N indicates a "no" vote; Y a "yes" vote. If a member voted "present" or was absent, the bill caption is not shown. For a complete description of the bills included in key votes, see the Almanac's Guide to Usage.

    • End fiscal cliff
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Block faith exemptions
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • Approve gas pipeline
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Approve farm bill
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Let cyber bill proceed
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • Block Gitmo transfers
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Raise debt limit
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Pass balanced budget amendment
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Stop EPA climate regulations
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Proceed to Cordray vote
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Require talking filibuster
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Limit Fannie/Freddie
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
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