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Democrat

Sen. Barbara Boxer (D)

Barbara Boxer Contact
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Email: n/a
DC Contact Information

Phone: 202-224-3553

Address: 112 HSOB, DC 20510

State Office Contact Information

Phone: (510) 286-8537

Address: 70 Washington Street, Oakland CA 94607

Los Angeles CA

Phone: (213) 894-5000

Fax: (202) 224-0357

Address: 312 North Spring Street, Los Angeles CA 90012-4719

Fresno CA

Phone: (559) 497-5109

Fax: (559) 497-5111

Address: 2500 Tulare Street, Fresno CA 93721-1318

San Diego CA

Phone: (619) 239-3884

Fax: (619) 239-5719

Address: 600 B Street, San Diego CA 92101-4508

Riverside CA

Phone: (951) 684-4849

Fax: (202) 228-3868

Address: 3403 Tenth Street, Riverside CA 92501

Sacramento CA

Phone: (916) 448-2787

Fax: (916) 448-2563

Address: 501 I Street, Sacramento CA 95814-7308

Barbara Boxer Staff
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Sort by INTEREST NAME TITLE
Katz, Emily
Health Policy Advisor
Katz, Emily
Health Policy Advisor
Lewandoski, Mona
Legislative Assistant
Braemer, Denise
Legislative Assistant
Esquivel, E.
Director of Information and Technology; Legislative Assistant
Esquivel, E.
Director of Information and Technology; Legislative Assistant
Katz, Emily
Health Policy Advisor
Lewandoski, Mona
Legislative Assistant
Reks, Ariana
Foreign Policy and Defense Advisor
Lewandoski, Mona
Legislative Assistant
Katz, Emily
Health Policy Advisor
Lewandoski, Mona
Legislative Assistant
Meier, Kaye
Senior Counsel
Meier, Kaye
Senior Counsel
Beland, Rebecca
Legislative Assistant
Meier, Kaye
Senior Counsel
Meier, Kaye
Senior Counsel
Meier, Kaye
Senior Counsel
Lively, Annie
Military Legislative Assistant
Meier, Kaye
Senior Counsel
Beland, Rebecca
Legislative Assistant
Meier, Kaye
Senior Counsel
Payette, Philip
Special Assistant for Security and Law Enforcement
Lively, Annie
Military Legislative Assistant
Moore, Sean
Legislative Director
Reks, Ariana
Foreign Policy and Defense Advisor
Katz, Emily
Health Policy Advisor
Katz, Emily
Health Policy Advisor
Meier, Kaye
Senior Counsel
Chapman, Kyle
Legislative Assistant
Chapman, Kyle
Legislative Assistant
Meier, Kaye
Senior Counsel
Lewandoski, Mona
Legislative Assistant
Lewandoski, Mona
Legislative Assistant
Esquivel, E.
Director of Information and Technology; Legislative Assistant
Moore, Sean
Legislative Director
Reks, Ariana
Foreign Policy and Defense Advisor
Braemer, Denise
Legislative Assistant
Braemer, Denise
Legislative Assistant
Beland, Rebecca
Legislative Assistant
Meier, Kaye
Senior Counsel
Katz, Emily
Health Policy Advisor
Braemer, Denise
Legislative Assistant
Reks, Ariana
Foreign Policy and Defense Advisor
Merkowitz, Jeffrey
Legislative Assistant; Director of Operations
Beland, Rebecca
Legislative Assistant
Meier, Kaye
Senior Counsel
Beland, Rebecca
Legislative Assistant
Meier, Kaye
Senior Counsel
Lewandoski, Mona
Legislative Assistant
Lively, Annie
Military Legislative Assistant
Moore, Sean
Legislative Director
Reks, Ariana
Foreign Policy and Defense Advisor
Braemer, Denise
Legislative Assistant
Meier, Kaye
Senior Counsel
Clement, Anne
Legislative Aide
Meier, Kaye
Senior Counsel
Beland, Rebecca
Legislative Assistant
Meier, Kaye
Senior Counsel
Payette, Philip
Special Assistant for Security and Law Enforcement
Katz, Emily
Health Policy Advisor
Katz, Emily
Health Policy Advisor
Katz, Emily
Health Policy Advisor
Lively, Annie
Military Legislative Assistant
Moore, Sean
Legislative Director
Reks, Ariana
Foreign Policy and Defense Advisor
Meier, Kaye
Senior Counsel
Chapman, Kyle
Legislative Assistant
Clement, Anne
Legislative Aide
Lewandoski, Mona
Legislative Assistant
Katz, Emily
Health Policy Advisor
Braemer, Denise
Legislative Assistant
Katz, Emily
Health Policy Advisor
Esquivel, E.
Director of Information and Technology; Legislative Assistant
Braemer, Denise
Legislative Assistant
Lewandoski, Mona
Legislative Assistant
Braemer, Denise
Legislative Assistant
Lewandoski, Mona
Legislative Assistant
Braemer, Denise
Legislative Assistant
Meier, Kaye
Senior Counsel
Braemer, Denise
Legislative Assistant
Reks, Ariana
Foreign Policy and Defense Advisor
Lewandoski, Mona
Legislative Assistant
Chapman, Kyle
Legislative Assistant
Chapman, Kyle
Legislative Assistant
Lively, Annie
Military Legislative Assistant
Reks, Ariana
Foreign Policy and Defense Advisor
Clement, Anne
Legislative Aide
Esquivel, E.
Director of Information and Technology; Legislative Assistant
Katz, Emily
Health Policy Advisor
Aquino, Candice
Assistant to the Director of Constituent Services
Beland, Rebecca
Legislative Assistant
Bierce, Agnieszka
California Systems Administrator
Bohigian, Tom
State Director
Boyer, Kelly
Executive Assistant; Director of Scheduling
Braemer, Denise
Legislative Assistant
Brennan, Kathleen
Assistant to the Director of Constituent Services
Chapman, Kyle
Legislative Assistant
Clement, Anne
Legislative Aide
Coile, Zachary
Communications Director
Cruz, Tony
Staff Assistant
Dawe, Sarah
Legislative Correspondent
Delgado, Julissa
Field Representative
Esquivel, E.
Director of Information and Technology; Legislative Assistant
Garrett, Alton
Southern California Director; Senior Advisor
Hart, Shannon
Assistant to the Director of State Operations
Henry, Alicia
Scheduling Assistant
Howard, Mark
Staff Assistant
Jones, Kelly
Staff Assistant
Kaneko, Nicole
Director of State Operations
Katz, Emily
Health Policy Advisor
Khan, Ameen
Director for Central and Eastern California
Kim, Min Hee
Correspondence Manager
Lewandoski, Mona
Legislative Assistant
Lewis, Sydney
Staff Assistant
Lively, Annie
Military Legislative Assistant
Livingston, Ryder
Legislative Correspondent
Lyles, Maurice
Constituent Representative
Martinez, Yvette
Deputy State Director; Senior Advisor
Meier, Kaye
Senior Counsel
Merkowitz, Jeffrey
Legislative Assistant; Director of Operations
Moore, Sean
Legislative Director
Ochoa, Nicholas
Constituent Representative
Payette, Philip
Special Assistant for Security and Law Enforcement
Peare, Madeline
Constituent Representative
Pennington, Ashley
Constituent Representative
Quigley, Joshua
Senior Field Representative
Reks, Ariana
Foreign Policy and Defense Advisor
Rivera, Tom
Legislative Research Assistant
Rolnicki, Rachel
Constituent Representative
Rosenthal, Aaron
Correspondence Manager
Sanchez, Caridad
San Diego County and Imperial County Director
Sanchez, Isabel
Constituent Representative
Smith, Stacey
Deputy State Director; California Press Liaison
Standifer, Tom
Special Assistant for Technology
Sutter, Brian
Staff Assistant
Tenney, Ryan
Staff Assistant
True, Peter
Press Secretary
Vasquez, Judith
Deputy Correspondence Director
Bierce, Agnieszka
California Systems Administrator
Garrett, Alton
Southern California Director; Senior Advisor
Katz, Emily
Health Policy Advisor
Martinez, Yvette
Deputy State Director; Senior Advisor
Reks, Ariana
Foreign Policy and Defense Advisor
Clement, Anne
Legislative Aide
Aquino, Candice
Assistant to the Director of Constituent Services
Brennan, Kathleen
Assistant to the Director of Constituent Services
Hart, Shannon
Assistant to the Director of State Operations
Coile, Zachary
Communications Director
Meier, Kaye
Senior Counsel
Bohigian, Tom
State Director
Boyer, Kelly
Executive Assistant; Director of Scheduling
Esquivel, E.
Director of Information and Technology; Legislative Assistant
Garrett, Alton
Southern California Director; Senior Advisor
Kaneko, Nicole
Director of State Operations
Khan, Ameen
Director for Central and Eastern California
Martinez, Yvette
Deputy State Director; Senior Advisor
Merkowitz, Jeffrey
Legislative Assistant; Director of Operations
Sanchez, Caridad
San Diego County and Imperial County Director
Smith, Stacey
Deputy State Director; California Press Liaison
Vasquez, Judith
Deputy Correspondence Director
Boyer, Kelly
Executive Assistant; Director of Scheduling
Beland, Rebecca
Legislative Assistant
Braemer, Denise
Legislative Assistant
Chapman, Kyle
Legislative Assistant
Esquivel, E.
Director of Information and Technology; Legislative Assistant
Lewandoski, Mona
Legislative Assistant
Lively, Annie
Military Legislative Assistant
Merkowitz, Jeffrey
Legislative Assistant; Director of Operations
Rivera, Tom
Legislative Research Assistant
Dawe, Sarah
Legislative Correspondent
Livingston, Ryder
Legislative Correspondent
Moore, Sean
Legislative Director
Smith, Stacey
Deputy State Director; California Press Liaison
Kim, Min Hee
Correspondence Manager
Rosenthal, Aaron
Correspondence Manager
True, Peter
Press Secretary
Delgado, Julissa
Field Representative
Lyles, Maurice
Constituent Representative
Ochoa, Nicholas
Constituent Representative
Peare, Madeline
Constituent Representative
Pennington, Ashley
Constituent Representative
Quigley, Joshua
Senior Field Representative
Rolnicki, Rachel
Constituent Representative
Sanchez, Isabel
Constituent Representative
Henry, Alicia
Scheduling Assistant
Payette, Philip
Special Assistant for Security and Law Enforcement
Standifer, Tom
Special Assistant for Technology
Cruz, Tony
Staff Assistant
Howard, Mark
Staff Assistant
Jones, Kelly
Staff Assistant
Lewis, Sydney
Staff Assistant
Sutter, Brian
Staff Assistant
Tenney, Ryan
Staff Assistant
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Barbara Boxer Committees
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Ethics (Select) (Vice chairman)
Barbara Boxer Biography
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  • Elected: 1992, term expires 2016, 4th term.
  • State: California
  • Born: Nov. 11, 1940, Brooklyn, NY
  • Home: Rancho Mirage
  • Education:

    Brooklyn Col., B.A. 1962

  • Professional Career:

    Stockbroker & researcher, 1962–65; Journalist, Pacific Sun, 1972–74; Dist. aide, U.S. Rep. John Burton, 1974–76.

  • Political Career:

    Marin Cnty. Bd. of Supervisors, 1976–82; U.S. House of Reps., 1983–93.

  • Ethnicity: White/Caucasian
  • Religion:

    Jewish

  • Family: Married (Stewart); 2 children

Barbara Boxer, California’s junior senator, is a Democrat first elected to the House in 1982 and a decade later to the Senate. She is the top Democrat on the Environment and Public Works Committee and one of the Senate’s staunch liberals, well-known for her outspokenness and passion. She announced in January 2015 that she would not seek a fifth term, setting off a frenetic scramble among prominent state Democrats. Read More

Barbara Boxer, California’s junior senator, is a Democrat first elected to the House in 1982 and a decade later to the Senate. She is the top Democrat on the Environment and Public Works Committee and one of the Senate’s staunch liberals, well-known for her outspokenness and passion. She announced in January 2015 that she would not seek a fifth term, setting off a frenetic scramble among prominent state Democrats.

Boxer grew up in Brooklyn, N.Y. In 1962, she graduated from Brooklyn College, where she met her husband, Stewart. The couple moved to Marin County, Calif., in 1968. Boxer, a stockbroker, volunteered for Eugene McCarthy’s presidential campaign that year. In 1970, she and some neighbors formed the Marin Alternative to oppose the Vietnam War. Marin County was only on its way to being trendy then; the overall political tone was liberal Republican, but heading left. In 1972, Boxer ran for the Board of Supervisors and lost to an incumbent Republican. She then went to work as an aide to Democratic U.S. Rep. John Burton. In 1976, she ran again for the county board and won. When Burton retired unexpectedly in 1982, Boxer ran for the House seat and was easily elected. In the House, she was known for her aggressive investigation into wasteful spending, unearthing the Air Force’s $7,622 coffee pot in 1984, and for her vocal opposition to the Gulf War in the early 1990s. She also led a group of women House members in a march to the steps of the Senate to demand hearings into law professor Anita Hill’s sexual-harassment allegations against Clarence Thomas, who was in the process of being confirmed to the Supreme Court.

In 1992, Boxer ran for the Senate. She started off as neither the best-known nor the best-financed candidate, but 1992 turned out to be the “Year of the Woman,” in which the enthusiasm of the feminist left helped produce important victories for Democratic candidates. Boxer won the June primary with 44% of the vote, to 31% for Lt. Gov. Leo McCarthy and 22% for U.S. Rep. Mel Levine. In the general election, her opponent was Bruce Herschensohn, a Los Angeles television and radio commentator. The Boxer-Herschensohn race was a battle of opposites, the far left versus the far right of the ideological spectrum. Herschensohn opposed abortion rights and advocated a flat tax and offshore oil drilling. Boxer’s positions were precisely the opposite. Her bid was helped by the poor showing of President George H.W. Bush’s campaign in California and by the revelation late in the campaign that Herschensohn had frequented nightclubs that featured nude dancers. She won with 48% of the vote.

Boxer’s voting record is among the most liberal in the Senate, and she has long been one of the chamber’s most outspoken members. She objected to Army Brigadier Gen. Michael Walsh calling her “ma’am” at a June 2009 hearing. “Could you say ‘senator’ instead of ‘ma’am?’’’ she asked Walsh. “It’s just a thing. I worked so hard to get that title.” Conservative bloggers called the remark arrogant, but she saw no need to apologize. Boxer is one of the strongest proponents of abortion rights in Congress and a prime sponsor of the Freedom of Choice Act, which would nullify all state restrictions on abortion.

In January 2005, as the electoral vote count from the previous year’s presidential election was read out to a joint session of Congress, she was the one senator to protest the awarding of Ohio’s electoral votes to Republican President George W. Bush. She recalled that four years earlier, no senator had protested the Florida vote in the bitterly contested presidential contest of 2000, and Boxer said she regretted not having protested then. Her protest triggered the dissolution of the joint session and a debate in each of the two chambers. The Senate voted 74-1 to accept the Ohio count, with Boxer as the lone dissenter, and the House voted 267-31 on the same question. “I hate inconveniencing my friends, but I think it’s worth a couple of hours to shine some light on these issues,” Boxer said.

She was a staunch defender of President Bill Clinton during the impeachment proceedings in 1998, when the president was accused of lying about an extramarital affair with a White House intern. During the Clinton years, Boxer was frustrated when Republicans held up nominations to the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals, long the most liberal in the country. So, during the George W. Bush years, she held up nominations of judges she considered too conservative. In 2001, she opposed the nomination of Rep. Christopher Cox of California to the Ninth Circuit. When Democratic Sen. Dianne Feinstein said she might oppose him too, Cox withdrew. In 2005, Boxer said she would “use all the parliamentary tools I’ve been given as a U.S. senator” to delay a vote on the confirmation of John Roberts to the Supreme Court, and she voted against both Roberts and Samuel Alito. In 2005, Boxer published a novel called A Time to Run about a liberal, woman senator from California opposing a conservative Supreme Court nominee. Four years later, she came out with another roman a clef political thriller, “Blind Trust,” about the same senator battling a Republican White House on homeland security and civil liberties.

In recent years, Boxer has concentrated on environmental issues. As the ranking member on the Environment and Public Works Committee during the years of Republican control of Congress, she sparred continually with conservative Chairman James Inhofe of Oklahoma over the issue of reducing carbon emissions to combat global warming. Inhofe famously said that the theory of human-caused global warming was a “hoax.” The committee’s emphasis changed abruptly when Democrats won the Senate majority in 2006. Boxer made addressing the causes of global warming her top legislative priority. “I really have two major goals,” she said. “They are to protect the health of the American people. And the second is to make the environment a bipartisan issue again on Capitol Hill.”

But her aggressive style did not always foster bipartisanship. In 2007, she harshly criticized then-Environmental Protection Agency chief Stephen Johnson for refusing to grant a waiver allowing California’s tough carbon emissions law to go into effect. She sought access to an EPA staff document recommending a waiver and accused Johnson of lying. She fumed during the summer and fall of 2008 when he refused to appear before the committee to testify. Inhofe boycotted the hearings as well. Boxer’s primary goal was to enact a cap-and-trade system to reduce carbon emissions, which she has called “the greatest challenge of our generation.” Such a system would allow companies to trade emissions “credits,” depending on the amount of pollution they generate. In 2007, Boxer’s committee took up a cap-and-trade bill sponsored by Connecticut independent Sen. Joe Lieberman and Virginia Republican John Warner, and in nearly 10 hours of hearings, she fended off more-restrictive amendments from independent Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders and less-restrictive amendments from others. In May 2008, she advanced a version with changes she hoped would increase support. In early June, her bill attracted only 48 votes in the Senate, well short of the 60 needed to proceed.

In the next Congress (2009-2010), senators from states that are heavily dependent on coal-generated electricity wanted to stop any cap-and-trade bill that would put their states at a competitive disadvantage, but during the early months of the Obama administration in 2009, Boxer continued to push the legislation. As the year progressed, however, she ceded control of the issue to Lieberman and Massachusetts Democratic Sen. John Kerry, more accomplished negotiators who did not have a reelection to worry about, unlike Boxer. Kerry and Lieberman enlisted South Carolina Republican Sen. Lindsey Graham in the hope that his support could bring aboard more Republicans. The three worked to develop a method of pricing carbon while increasing production of nuclear power, a compromise Boxer said she could accept. However, when Majority Leader Harry Reid proposed bringing up a comprehensive immigration bill for debate in April 2010, Graham said the climate bill was far closer to being ready and angrily accused Reid of catering to Hispanics in order to win his own reelection, essentially killing any deal.

Boxer pursued other bipartisan initiatives, working in 2007 with the Bush White House to increase the energy efficiency of federal buildings. She co-sponsored, with Republican John Ensign of Nevada, a bill to reduce the tax on corporate profits earned abroad if they were invested in creating American jobs. But after Congress’ Joint Committee on Taxation pegged the revenue loss at $28 billion, the measure was not included in the president’s February 2009 economic stimulus bill. Boxer has long been interested in enacting a “bill of rights” for stranded airline passengers, and in 2009 she joined Republican Sen. Olympia Snowe of Maine in seeking support for a measure allowing passengers to deplane after every three hours on the ground and to be given food, water, and other amenities while they wait. It was incorporated as part of a reauthorization bill for the Federal Aviation Administration that passed the Senate in 2010 but stalled in negotiations with the House. The Obama administration issued a rule modeled after their legislation that took effect in April of that year.

In 2007 and 2008, Boxer was entrusted with considerable institutional responsibilities when Reid appointed her to temporarily replace the disabled Tim Johnson of South Dakota as chairman of the Senate Ethics Committee. (Johnson suffered a brain hemorrhage in late 2006 but recovered.) In February 2008, she led the committee in admonishing Republican Larry Craig of Idaho for attempting to withdraw his guilty plea following his arrest in a homosexual sex sting in a Minneapolis airport men’s room. He had pleaded guilty to a disorderly conduct charge, a misdemeanor, and later, after the incident was publicized, tried to change the plea. Under Boxer, the panel also admonished New Mexico Republican Pete Domenici for contacting a federal prosecutor who was investigating state Democrats in a corruption case. In June 2008, after public revelations that Democrats Christopher Dodd of Connecticut and Kent Conrad of North Dakota had received favorable terms on home mortgages, committee members voted unanimously to require more disclosure of members’ mortgage terms.

During her first three years in the Senate, Boxer’s job ratings were among the Senate’s lowest. But California, with its large metropolitan areas, trended sharply toward the Democrats in the mid-1990s. From about 1997 on, Boxer generally has had positive job ratings, though they are somewhat lower than those of her more centrist colleague Feinstein. In 1998, Boxer was challenged by Republican state Treasurer Matt Fong. She raised $15 million and ran ads attacking Fong for what she called his ambiguous stances on issues like abortion rights. Fong attacked her for what he called the hypocrisy of her support for Clinton. (The president’s brother-in-law, Tony Rodham, married Boxer’s daughter.) But Fong failed to raise much money. Boxer won 53%-43%. She won 61% of the vote in Los Angeles County and 63% in the San Francisco Bay Area, and was not far behind in Southern California and the rest of the state—an impressive performance for a Democrat dismissed a few years before as too left-wing for much of the state.

When she was up for reelection in 2004, Boxer raised impressive amounts of money early, and well-known Republicans declined to make the race against her. Her opponent was Bill Jones, who had been elected secretary of state by narrow margins in 1994 and 1998 yet was not well known outside his home base in Fresno County. Boxer spent $16 million to Jones’ $7 million. She won 58%-38%.

In early November 2009, Carly Fiorina, the former chief executive officer of Hewlett-Packard, decided to seek the GOP nomination to challenge Boxer in 2010. The well-connected former CEO had the potential to be a well-financed and formidable opponent, and after investing $5.5 million of her own savings, breezed past her Republican rivals in the June primary with 56% to former Rep. Tom Campbell’s 22% and Assemblyman Chuck DeVore’s 19%.

The political climate appeared ripe for Fiorina, with public distrust of Washington and its longtime inhabitants reaching a crescendo in the summer. Fiorina ran as an outsider with business experience, calling Boxer “one of the most bitterly partisan” senators and attacking her record of getting only a handful of original bills passed into law. She even was caught on an open microphone criticizing Boxer’s hairstyle as “so yesterday.” Fiorina also embraced such conservative causes as opposing abortion rights and backing offshore drilling that risked alienating moderates and independents.

Boxer attacked her opponent on those issues but focused on Fiorina’s tenure at Hewlett-Packard, citing the company’s decision to lay off 28,000 workers and moving jobs overseas. Boxer refuted criticism of her thin legislative record, citing “1,000 Boxer provisions” enacted as amendments or other additions to legislation. She got a boost from President Obama, whose popularity in the Golden State was above his national ratings and who campaigned for her in the state. In the end, Fiorina could not overcome the state’s Democratic tilt and Boxer handily won a fourth term, finishing with 52% to Fiorina’s 42%. Boxer noted that voters also returned former Democratic Gov. Jerry Brown to office and said, “I think as (voters) looked at Jerry and they looked at me, they said, ‘you know, these are two imperfect people...but we trust them.’’’

During the 112th Congress (2011-12), Boxer focused heavily on transportation and highway funding. And despite her earlier conflicts with Inhofe, she worked with him to iron out the details of a new federal transportation bill. The two-year bill had no spending earmarks and consolidated roughly 90 highway programs into 30. It passed the Senate, 76-22. Describing Boxer’s role in the negotiations, the San Francisco Chronicle observed: “Tea Party conservatives have managed to transform (Boxer) into a paragon of bipartisanship.” For a time, the companion bill in the House stalled, but ultimately a $100 billion bill passed both the House and Senate in late June 2012.

In recent years, Boxer has paid special attention to local environmental issues. After complaints about pollution and odor in Mecca, Calif., Boxer asked the Environmental Protection Agency to investigate and appeared at a press event with environmental activist Erin Brockovich, who shot to prominence with a 2000 movie about her life starring Julia Roberts. The EPA forced a halt to all hazardous waste deliveries to the Western Environmental recycling plant and ordered the company to remove some contaminated soil. In February 2012, Boxer asked the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to do a full-scale review of the accident-prone San Onofre nuclear plant near San Diego. She also got a bill signed into law in May 2012 that enables the city of Tracy, Calif., to buy land for a solar energy facility.

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Barbara Boxer Election Results
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2010 General
Barbara Boxer (D)
Votes: 5,218,441
Percent: 52.18%
Spent: $29,331,343
Carly Fiorina
Votes: 4,217,366
Percent: 42.17%
Spent: $21,521,397
2010 Primary
Barbara Boxer (D)
Votes: 1,957,920
Percent: 80.91%
Brian Quintana
Votes: 338,442
Percent: 13.99%
Robert Kaus
Votes: 123,573
Percent: 5.11%
Prior Winning Percentages
2004 (58%), 1998 (53%), 1992 (48%); House: 1990 (68%), 1988 (73%), 1986 (74%), 1984 (68%), 1982 (52%)
Barbara Boxer Votes and Bills
Back to top NJ Vote Ratings

National Journal’s rating system is an objective method of analyzing voting. The liberal score means that the lawmaker’s votes were more liberal than that percentage of his colleagues’ votes. The conservative score means his votes were more conservative than that percentage of his colleagues’ votes. The composite score is an average of a lawmaker’s six issue-based scores. See all NJ Voting

More Liberal
More Conservative
2013 2012 2011
Economic 93 (L) : - (C) 85 (L) : 14 (C) 81 (L) : 12 (C)
Social 73 (L) : - (C) 64 (L) : - (C) 52 (L) : - (C)
Foreign 64 (L) : 35 (C) 85 (L) : - (C) 92 (L) : - (C)
Composite 82.5 (L) : 17.5 (C) 86.7 (L) : 13.3 (C) 85.5 (L) : 14.5 (C)
Interest Group Ratings

The vote ratings by 10 special interest groups provide insight into a lawmaker’s general ideology and the degree to which he or she agrees with the group’s point of view. Two organizations provide just one combined rating for 2011 and 2012, the two sessions of the 112th Congress. They are the ACLU and the ITIC. About the interest groups.

20112012
FRC140
LCV100100
CFG65
ITIC-63
NTU97
20112012
COC45-
ACLU-75
ACU04
ADA9590
AFSCME100-
Key Senate Votes

The key votes show how a member of Congress voted on the major bills of the year. N indicates a "no" vote; Y a "yes" vote. If a member voted "present" or was absent, the bill caption is not shown. For a complete description of the bills included in key votes, see the Almanac's Guide to Usage.

    • End fiscal cliff
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Block faith exemptions
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Approve gas pipeline
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • Approve farm bill
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Let cyber bill proceed
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Block Gitmo transfers
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • Raise debt limit
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Pass balanced budget amendment
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Stop EPA climate regulations
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Proceed to Cordray vote
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Require talking filibuster
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Limit Fannie/Freddie
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Regulate financial firms
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2010
    • Pass tax cuts for some
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2010
    • Legalize immigrants' kids
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2010
    • Ratify New START
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2010
    • Confirm Elena Kagan
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2010
    • Stop EPA climate regs
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2010
    • Repeal don't ask, tell
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2010
    • Overturn Ledbetter
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Block release of TARP funds
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Pass $787 billion stimulus
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Repeal DC gun laws
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Confirm Sonia Sotomayor
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Pass health care bill
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Bar budget rules for climate bill
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Pass 2010 budget resolution
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Let judges adjust mortgages
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Allow FDA to regulate tobacco
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Protect gays from hate crimes
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Cut F-22 funds
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Label North Korea terrorist state
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Build Guantanamo replacement
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Allow federal funds for abortion
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Cap greenhouse gases
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2008
    • Bail out financial markets
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2008
    • Increase missile defense $
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2008
    • Overhaul FISA
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2008
    • Raise CAFE standards
    • Vote:
    • Year: 2007
    • Expand SCHIP
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
    • Make English official language
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • Path to citizenship
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
    • Fetus is unborn child
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • Prosecute hate crimes
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
    • Withdraw troops 3/08
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
    • Iran guard is terrorist group
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
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The Almanac is a members-only database of searchable profiles compiled and adapted from the Almanac of American Politics. Comprehensive online profiles include biographical and political summaries of elected officials, campaign expenditures, voting records, interest-group ratings, and congressional staff look-ups. In-depth overviews of each state and house district are included as well, along with demographic data, analysis of voting trends, and political histories.
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