Skip Navigation

Close and don't show again.

Your browser is out of date.

You may not get the full experience here on National Journal.

Please upgrade your browser to any of the following supported browsers:

Mark Warner Mark Warner

NEXT :
This ad will end in seconds
 
Close X

Want access to this content? Learn More »

Forget Your Password?

Don't have an account? Register »

Reveal Navigation
 

 

Almanac

Search

Enter your search query or use our Advanced People Search. Need Help? View our search tips

View Saved Lists
View Saved Lists
Democrat

Sen. Mark Warner (D)

Mark Warner Contact
Back to top
Email: n/a
DC Contact Information

Phone: 202-224-2023

Address: 475 RSOB, DC 20510

State Office Contact Information

Phone: (804) 775-2314

Address: 919 East Main Street, Richmond VA 23219

Vienna VA

Phone: (703) 442-0670

Fax: (703) 442-0408

Address: 8000 Towers Crescent Drive, Vienna VA 22182

Norfolk VA

Phone: (757) 441-3079

Fax: (757) 441-6250

Address: 101 West Main Street, Norfolk VA 23510

Roanoke VA

Phone: (540) 857-2676

Fax: (540) 857-2800

Address: 129B Salem Avenue, SW, Roanoke VA 24011

Abingdon VA

Phone: (276) 628-8158

Fax: (276) 628-1036

Address: 180 West Main Street, Abingdon VA 24210

Mark Warner Staff
Back to top
Sort by INTEREST NAME TITLE
Runyan, Caitlin
Legislative Assistant
Runyan, Caitlin
Legislative Assistant
Dalal, Milan
Senior Economic Advisor
Marshall, Lauren
Legislative Correspondent
Marshall, Lauren
Legislative Correspondent
Brunner, Mark
Senior Advisor for National Security and Energy
Curtis, John
Legislative Correspondent
Figueroa, Marvin
Legislative Assistant
Marshall, Lauren
Legislative Correspondent
Brunner, Mark
Senior Advisor for National Security and Energy
Johnson, Ken
Legislative Correspondent
Runyan, Caitlin
Legislative Assistant
Dalal, Milan
Senior Economic Advisor
Santabar, Lauren
Legislative Correspondent
Dalal, Milan
Senior Economic Advisor
Runyan, Caitlin
Legislative Assistant
Brunner, Mark
Senior Advisor for National Security and Energy
Curtis, John
Legislative Correspondent
Dalal, Milan
Senior Economic Advisor
Johnson, Ken
Legislative Correspondent
Johnson, Ken
Legislative Correspondent
Marshall, Lauren
Legislative Correspondent
Arnowitz, Charlie
Legislative Correspondent
Figueroa, Marvin
Legislative Assistant
Brunner, Mark
Senior Advisor for National Security and Energy
Maiwurm, Michelle
Legislative Assistant
Marshall, Lauren
Legislative Correspondent
Peck, Emma
Legislative Correspondent
Dalal, Milan
Senior Economic Advisor
Santabar, Lauren
Legislative Correspondent
Santabar, Lauren
Legislative Correspondent
Brunner, Mark
Senior Advisor for National Security and Energy
Curtis, John
Legislative Correspondent
Dalal, Milan
Senior Economic Advisor
Marshall, Lauren
Legislative Correspondent
Santabar, Lauren
Legislative Correspondent
Marshall, Lauren
Legislative Correspondent
Marshall, Lauren
Legislative Correspondent
Santabar, Lauren
Legislative Correspondent
Marshall, Lauren
Legislative Correspondent
Arnowitz, Charlie
Legislative Correspondent
Arnowitz, Charlie
Legislative Correspondent
Arnowitz, Charlie
Legislative Correspondent
Figueroa, Marvin
Legislative Assistant
Brunner, Mark
Senior Advisor for National Security and Energy
Curtis, John
Legislative Correspondent
Dalal, Milan
Senior Economic Advisor
Kosa, Lauren
National Security Fellow
Johnson, Ken
Legislative Correspondent
Runyan, Caitlin
Legislative Assistant
Marshall, Lauren
Legislative Correspondent
Santabar, Lauren
Legislative Correspondent
Dalal, Milan
Senior Economic Advisor
Santabar, Lauren
Legislative Correspondent
Figueroa, Marvin
Legislative Assistant
Marshall, Lauren
Legislative Correspondent
Peck, Emma
Legislative Correspondent
Maiwurm, Michelle
Legislative Assistant
Marshall, Lauren
Legislative Correspondent
Santabar, Lauren
Legislative Correspondent
Dalal, Milan
Senior Economic Advisor
Santabar, Lauren
Legislative Correspondent
Maiwurm, Michelle
Legislative Assistant
Peck, Emma
Legislative Correspondent
Maiwurm, Michelle
Legislative Assistant
Peck, Emma
Legislative Correspondent
Brunner, Mark
Senior Advisor for National Security and Energy
Dalal, Milan
Senior Economic Advisor
Santabar, Lauren
Legislative Correspondent
Marshall, Lauren
Legislative Correspondent
Brunner, Mark
Senior Advisor for National Security and Energy
Johnson, Ken
Legislative Correspondent
Johnson, Ken
Legislative Correspondent
Marshall, Lauren
Legislative Correspondent
Arnowitz, Charlie
Legislative Correspondent
Asher, Patricia
Assistant to the Administrative Director
Balderston, Carrig
Director of Scheduling
Blewett, Reagan
Administrative Director
Bodenhamer, Sandy
Constituent Services Representative
Brunner, Mark
Senior Advisor for National Security and Energy
Burton, Eldon
Outreach Representative
Cake, Bet
Constituent Services Representative
Clem, Shane
Constituent Advocate
Conner, Keyanna
Director of Government & Community Affairs
Curtis, John
Legislative Correspondent
Dalal, Milan
Senior Economic Advisor
Densmore, Drew
Outreach Representative
Figueroa, Marvin
Legislative Assistant
Ford, Carol
Constituent Services Representative
Goode, Denise
Constituent Services Director
Hall, Kevin
Communications Director
Johnson, Ken
Legislative Correspondent
Kadiri, Lou
Deputy State Director
Kosa, Lauren
National Security Fellow
Lumpkin, Drew
Regional Director
Maiwurm, Michelle
Legislative Assistant
Marshall, Lauren
Legislative Correspondent
Mayer, Jack
Systems Administrator
Pardini, Liana
Assistant to the Chief of Staff; Deputy Scheduler
Peck, Emma
Legislative Correspondent
Phan, Anh
Outreach Representative
Pillis, Katie
Constituent Advocate
Price, Scott
Regional Director
Runyan, Caitlin
Legislative Assistant
Rust, Ann
State Director
Santabar, Lauren
Legislative Correspondent
Taylor, Sam Louis
Outreach Representative
Thomas, Owen
Staff Assistant
Mayer, Jack
Systems Administrator
Brunner, Mark
Senior Advisor for National Security and Energy
Dalal, Milan
Senior Economic Advisor
Clem, Shane
Constituent Advocate
Pillis, Katie
Constituent Advocate
Asher, Patricia
Assistant to the Administrative Director
Pardini, Liana
Assistant to the Chief of Staff; Deputy Scheduler
Hall, Kevin
Communications Director
Balderston, Carrig
Director of Scheduling
Blewett, Reagan
Administrative Director
Conner, Keyanna
Director of Government & Community Affairs
Goode, Denise
Constituent Services Director
Kadiri, Lou
Deputy State Director
Lumpkin, Drew
Regional Director
Price, Scott
Regional Director
Rust, Ann
State Director
Kosa, Lauren
National Security Fellow
Figueroa, Marvin
Legislative Assistant
Maiwurm, Michelle
Legislative Assistant
Runyan, Caitlin
Legislative Assistant
Arnowitz, Charlie
Legislative Correspondent
Curtis, John
Legislative Correspondent
Johnson, Ken
Legislative Correspondent
Marshall, Lauren
Legislative Correspondent
Peck, Emma
Legislative Correspondent
Santabar, Lauren
Legislative Correspondent
Bodenhamer, Sandy
Constituent Services Representative
Burton, Eldon
Outreach Representative
Cake, Bet
Constituent Services Representative
Densmore, Drew
Outreach Representative
Ford, Carol
Constituent Services Representative
Phan, Anh
Outreach Representative
Taylor, Sam Louis
Outreach Representative
Pardini, Liana
Assistant to the Chief of Staff; Deputy Scheduler
Note: You can only itemize lists in the Interests and Title sections
Save List
X

Your saved lists will appear under My Saved Lists on The Almanac's landing page.

Mark Warner Committees
Back to top
Mark Warner Biography
Back to top
  • Elected: 2008, term expires 2014, 1st term.
  • State: Virginia
  • Born: Dec. 15, 1954, Indianapolis, IN
  • Home: Alexandria
  • Education:

    George Washington U., B.A. 1977, Harvard U., J.D. 1980

  • Professional Career:

    Fundraiser, DNC, 1980-82; Venture capitalist, 1982-89; Mng. dir., Columbia Capital Corp., 1989-2001; Chairman, VA Democratic Party, 1993-95.

  • Political Career:

    VA gov., 2001-05.

  • Ethnicity: White/Caucasian
  • Religion:

    Presbyterian

  • Family: Married (Lisa Collis); 3 children

Democrat Mark Warner, a former Virginia governor elected in 2008, is the state’s senior senator. He is considered one of his party’s fast-rising stars, having found a way for Democrats to make inroads among Southern voters. But he sweated out a close win in what was initially thought to be an easy reelection bid in 2014. Read More

Democrat Mark Warner, a former Virginia governor elected in 2008, is the state’s senior senator. He is considered one of his party’s fast-rising stars, having found a way for Democrats to make inroads among Southern voters. But he sweated out a close win in what was initially thought to be an easy reelection bid in 2014.

Warner was born in Indianapolis, where his father was a safety evaluator for Aetna Life & Casualty Inc. and his mother stayed at home with their two children. The family moved to Vernon, Conn., when Warner was in the eighth grade. He later recalled that he was influenced by a social studies teacher who encouraged his students to pay attention to the turbulent social change unfolding in the late 1960s. He graduated from George Washington University, the first college graduate in his family, and from Harvard Law School. Although he has emphasized his business experience in his campaigns, his first love seems to have been politics.

After law school, he worked in fundraising for the Democratic National Committee and in 1989, managed Douglas Wilder’s successful campaign to become Virginia’s first African-American governor. His business success in fact grew out of his political contacts. While working for the DNC, Warner met Rep. Tom McMillen, a Maryland Democrat, who told him about the potential of cell phone markets just as the Reagan administration was about to award 1,500 free licenses for metropolitan markets. Warner cobbled together investor groups and packaged their applications in exchange for a fee and a 5% ownership stake if they received the licenses. The best known of these ventures was Nextel, and Warner quickly became a wealthy man. His average net worth in 2011 was estimated at $228 million, making him one of the richest members of Congress.

But politics was always on Warner’s mind. From 1993 to 1995, he was the Virginia Democratic chairman. In 1996, he ran against Republican Sen. John Warner in what seemed a quixotic race: The senior Warner, elected narrowly in 1978, had won reelection in a landslide in 1984 and had no Democratic opponent in 1990. Mark Warner pitched his campaign not to his home turf in Northern Virginia but to the Shenandoah Valley and southwest Virginia. He carried Southwest Virginia and lost the part of the state outside the three big metropolitan areas by only 51%-49%, a considerable achievement for a Democrat. But John Warner’s strength among moderates enabled him to carry Northern Virginia 55%-45% and to carry Tidewater and metropolitan Richmond with smaller majorities. The result was a 52%-47% win for John Warner, but certainly not an end to upstart Mark Warner’s political career.

In the late 1990s, Mark Warner put millions of dollars into philanthropic efforts and set up four regional business investment funds in Southwest Virginia, Southside Virginia, Richmond, and Tidewater. By 1999, he had an eye on running for governor in 2001 as an entrepreneur who could bring savvy business methods to government. He picked a good year. Incumbent Republican Gov. Jim Gilmore had succeeded in helping to elect Republican majorities in both houses of the legislature but then battled with them over the budget. Republicans had a primary battle in 2001 between Lt. Gov. John Hager and former Attorney General Mark Earley. Earley won but had little money and no clear campaign strategy. Warner ultimately spent $5 million of his own money on the campaign.

Warner lived in a mansion in Old Town Alexandria but avoided being typecast as an urban liberal. He called himself a fiscal conservative and pledged not to raise the income or sales taxes. Responding to complaints from traffic-choked Northern Virginia and Tidewater, he called for regional referenda on local sales tax increases for transportation. He opposed any new gun control laws and wooed the National Rifle Association, which remained neutral. Warner ran ads featuring old pickup trucks and bluegrass music, and he sponsored a NASCAR race truck. He traveled to all parts of rural Virginia, much as Wilder had in 1989, to show that he was in touch with everyday folks and to remind them of his investment funds and philanthropic initiatives.

Warner won, but not resoundingly, by 52%-47%, a reversal of the numbers in the 1996 Senate race. He carried all major regions of the state, albeit by narrow margins. And he attracted notice from national Democrats for winning a Southern state through business-friendly, fiscally responsible policies along with cultural conservatism—a combination Warner dubbed “radical centrism.”

Once in office, Warner got the legislature to approve transportation tax referenda in Northern Virginia and Tidewater, but the House of Delegates rejected his education initiative in 2002. As a budget shortfall grew, Warner cut $858 million in spending and laid off 1,800 state employees. In November 2003, after the legislative elections and when Virginia seemed to be in danger of losing its AAA bond rating, Warner presented his new fiscal plan: a $1 billion tax increase, with increases in the income, sales, and cigarette taxes, and tax reductions for those with low incomes and in the car and food taxes. In early 2004, his plan was rejected by the heavily Republican House of Delegates, which increased taxes by just $520 million and provided few spending increases. But the state Senate passed a $3.8 billion tax increase, with $1.7 billion in new spending for schools and $1.6 billion for transportation. GOP Speaker William Howell was unable to hold his Republicans in line, and 17 of them abandoned their anti-tax positions. The Senate agreed to a $1.3 billion tax increase, more than Warner had requested, and the House went along, a major victory for Warner.

By December 2004, the fiscal picture had changed. State government was facing a $1.2 billion surplus, and Warner called for more spending. He also sought a larger national profile. He became chairman of the National Governors Association, urged Democratic presidential candidate John Kerry to target Virginia (which Kerry did, until August), and advised other Democrats around the country about how to win support in rural areas and among conservative voters on culture issues. He was viewed as a potential presidential candidate in 2008, as a Democrat who would appeal to moderates. But in October 2006, he announced he would not run, citing the impact a national campaign would have on his family.

Then, when Sen. John Warner announced in August 2007 that he would retire from the Senate after five terms, Mark Warner’s next career move seemed obvious. He had no serious opposition for the Democratic nomination. On the Republican side, Jim Gilmore, Warner’s predecessor as governor, decided to get into the race. At the state Republicans’ nominating convention in June 2008, Gilmore barely prevailed after being challenged from the right by Delegate Robert Marshall because of Gilmore’s support for abortion rights in some cases. He only narrowly secured the nomination.

It turned out not to be a seriously contested campaign. Warner argued that Gilmore left the state in poor fiscal shape and that he had been able to turn things around. Warner won 65%-34%, losing only two counties in the Shenandoah Valley, two exurban Richmond counties, and two small independent cities. He got 2.37 million votes, the first candidate in Virginia history to win more than 2 million votes. (Democrat Tim Kaine became the second in his 2012 Senate race.) He won 69% of the votes in Northern Virginia, 68% in Tidewater, 64% in Richmond, and 62% in the rest of the state, running far ahead of Democratic presidential nominee Barack Obama even as Obama was carrying the state by six points. For the first time since 1970, when Harry Byrd, Jr. declared himself an independent, Virginia had two Democratic senators.

In the Senate, Warner lamented the adjustment that ex-governors face in becoming one of 100 legislators. His driven and frenetic personality has become a source of humor among his colleagues. In a “Secret Santa” gift exchange in 2011, Nebraska Republican Mike Johanns presented him with a large Energizer bunny. “Mark never stops,” Johanns said. In recounting his working closely with the laid-back Republican Saxby Chambliss of Georgia, Warner told reporters in January 2013, “The way he starts each day is, ‘Well, Mark, did you take your Ritalin today?’”

Warner’s voting habits have put him in the political center. He has supported the Obama administration on some major legislation, but he also has joined Republicans in backing caps on discretionary spending. He called in 2011 for Virginia to become the first East Coast state to allow offshore drilling, which he saw as a pragmatic way to bring in jobs and new revenue. He was one of five Senate Democrats in June 2012 to vote in favor of taking up a failed GOP resolution to overturn a regulation cutting mercury and other toxic emissions from coal-fired power plants. Despite his “A” rating from the NRA, he said after the Newtown, Conn., elementary school massacre that “the status quo isn’t acceptable” on guns.

Warner became best known for joining forces with Chambliss in leading a “Gang of Six” on budget issues in the hopes of putting the recommendations of the bipartisan Simpson-Bowles deficit reduction commission into legislation. To keep the group’s closed-door meetings from becoming too partisan, Warner reportedly would occasionally push a comic buzzer that sounded the message: “Bull---- detected. Take precautions.” By July 2011, as lawmakers faced a controversial increase in the federal debt limit, the Warner-Chambliss group had developed a $3.7 trillion deficit-reduction plan. Of that total, $2.7 trillion in cuts came from adjustments to Medicaid and Social Security. Meanwhile, federal revenues would be increased $1.1 trillion over 10 years through changes to tax deductions for home mortgage interest, charitable giving, and health care insurance. But Republicans remained resolutely opposed to any revenue increases, and the deficit-reduction “super committee” failed to make headway in addressing the deadlock between the parties. The gang’s proposal never became formal legislation, and the leadership of both parties paid the group scant attention.

Warner repeatedly expressed frustration over his inability to get a deal, especially after giving talks around the country on the subject. “In Washington there is no support group, or institutional structure, to support people doing the right thing,” he complained at a June 2012 summit in Richmond. When the lack of an agreement triggered steep automatic budget cuts in March 2013, he acknowledged at a meeting of defense and technology executives that Congress had “muffed this thing.” But he also pinned blame on the executives. “Every time there’s been efforts to try to build a broader coalition … most of y’all have said, ‘Well, I don’t want to piss off this guy or that guy or this chairman or that chairman,’’’ he told them.

In other bipartisan ventures, Warner and Tennessee Republican Bob Corker worked in 2009 and 2010 on ways to prevent financial institutions from becoming “too big to fail” as part of the Wall Street overhaul. Later in 2010, Warner circulated a proposal to let tax cuts for the wealthy expire and to use the money to finance additional tax cuts for small business and investment. He worked in 2012 with Republicans Marco Rubio of Florida and Jerry Moran of Kansas on legislation to encourage entrepreneurship and promote job creation.

In his early months in office, Warner was given the chairmanship of a Budget Committee task force on government performance. He advocated eliminating spending on 17 programs, from watershed infrastructure grants to brownfields redevelopment. His proposal won committee approval as part of a broader budget measure, but the full Senate never acted on it. On other issues, Warner pushed legislation authorizing the Federal Communications Commission to hold incentive auctions to free up the wireless spectrum. During the health care overhaul debate, he led 11 freshman Democrats in proposing a series of amendments intended to control costs and boost accountability of the new program.

After the 2010 elections, Warner had a chance to become part of the Senate leadership when he was offered the chairmanship of the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee. But he turned down the job, which would have required him to become much more of a partisan. He toyed with running again in 2013 for governor, which he called “the best job I ever had,” but opted against it.

Despite Warner's popularity and deep well of campaign funds, former National Republican Committee chairman Ed Gillespie decided to challenge him in 2014. Gillespie hoped that he might be able to sneak into office in a year in which Democrats nationally were expected to do badly. He came extremely close: Many of the voters who turned out at the polls were hard-core partisans who were unreceptive to the senator's centrist pitch and unfazed by Democrats' repeated attempts to brand Gillespie as a lobbyist and Beltway insider. Warner had to rely on the overwhelming Democratic votes of Northern Virginia to carry off a victory by less than 1 percentage point.

Show Less
Mark Warner Election Results
Back to top
2008 General
Mark Warner (D)
Votes: 2,369,327
Percent: 65.03%
Spent: $13,663,049
Jim Gilmore
Votes: 1,228,830
Percent: 33.73%
Spent: $2,777,933
2008 Primary
Mark Warner (D)
Unopposed
Prior Winning Percentages
Governor: 2001 (52%)
Mark Warner Votes and Bills
Back to top NJ Vote Ratings

National Journal’s rating system is an objective method of analyzing voting. The liberal score means that the lawmaker’s votes were more liberal than that percentage of his colleagues’ votes. The conservative score means his votes were more conservative than that percentage of his colleagues’ votes. The composite score is an average of a lawmaker’s six issue-based scores. See all NJ Voting

More Liberal
More Conservative
2013 2012 2011
Economic 58 (L) : 41 (C) 51 (L) : 48 (C) 61 (L) : 38 (C)
Social 55 (L) : 44 (C) 55 (L) : 43 (C) 52 (L) : - (C)
Foreign 54 (L) : 44 (C) 63 (L) : 32 (C) 68 (L) : 26 (C)
Composite 56.3 (L) : 43.7 (C) 57.7 (L) : 42.3 (C) 69.5 (L) : 30.5 (C)
Interest Group Ratings

The vote ratings by 10 special interest groups provide insight into a lawmaker’s general ideology and the degree to which he or she agrees with the group’s point of view. Two organizations provide just one combined rating for 2011 and 2012, the two sessions of the 112th Congress. They are the ACLU and the ITIC. About the interest groups.

20112012
FRC00
LCV10086
CFG1620
ITIC-88
NTU1519
20112012
COC70-
ACLU-75
ACU513
ADA9085
AFSCME100-
Key Senate Votes

The key votes show how a member of Congress voted on the major bills of the year. N indicates a "no" vote; Y a "yes" vote. If a member voted "present" or was absent, the bill caption is not shown. For a complete description of the bills included in key votes, see the Almanac's Guide to Usage.

    • End fiscal cliff
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Block faith exemptions
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Approve gas pipeline
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • Approve farm bill
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Let cyber bill proceed
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Block Gitmo transfers
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • Raise debt limit
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Pass balanced budget amendment
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Stop EPA climate regulations
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Proceed to Cordray vote
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Require talking filibuster
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Limit Fannie/Freddie
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Regulate financial firms
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2010
    • Pass tax cuts for some
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2010
    • Legalize immigrants' kids
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2010
    • Ratify New START
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2010
    • Confirm Elena Kagan
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2010
    • Stop EPA climate regs
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2010
    • Repeal don't ask, tell
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2010
    • Overturn Ledbetter
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Block release of TARP funds
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Pass $787 billion stimulus
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Repeal DC gun laws
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Confirm Sonia Sotomayor
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Pass health care bill
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Bar budget rules for climate bill
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Pass 2010 budget resolution
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Let judges adjust mortgages
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Allow FDA to regulate tobacco
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Protect gays from hate crimes
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Cut F-22 funds
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Label North Korea terrorist state
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Build Guantanamo replacement
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Allow federal funds for abortion
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
Read More
 
Browse The Almanac
Congressional Leadership
and Committees

House Committees
Senate Committees
Joint Committees
Leadership Roster
About Almanac
almanac cover
The Almanac is a members-only database of searchable profiles compiled and adapted from the Almanac of American Politics. Comprehensive online profiles include biographical and political summaries of elected officials, campaign expenditures, voting records, interest-group ratings, and congressional staff look-ups. In-depth overviews of each state and house district are included as well, along with demographic data, analysis of voting trends, and political histories.
Members: Buy the book at 25% off retail.
Order Now
Need Help?

Contact Us:

202.266.7900 | membership@nationaljournal.com