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Democrat

Sen. Tom Udall (D)

Tom Udall Contact
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Email: n/a
DC Contact Information

Phone: 202-224-6621

Address: 110 HSOB, DC 20510

State Office Contact Information

Phone: (505) 346-6791

Address: 219 Central Avenue, NW, Albuquerque NM 87102

Las Cruces NM

Phone: (575) 526-5475

Fax: (575) 523-6589

Address: 201 North Church Street, Las Cruces NM 88001

Santa Fe NM

Phone: (505) 988-6511

Fax: (505) 988-6514

Address: 120 South Federal Plaza, Santa Fe NM 87501

Carlsbad NM

Phone: (575) 234-0366

Address: 102 West Hagerman Street, Carlsbad NM 88220

Portales NM

Phone: (575) 356-6811

Fax: (575) 356-6814

Address: 100 South Avenue A, Portales NM 88130

Tom Udall Staff
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Arias, Lauren
Correspondence Director
Cummins, Kevin
Legislative Assistant
Curley, Calvert
Field Representative
Lukens, Jeanette
Legislative Assistant
Lukens, Jeanette
Legislative Assistant
Page, Russell
Legislative Correspondent
Nelson, Matthew
Legislative Counsel
Goodhart, Fern
Legislative Assistant
Lopez, Jeffrey
Legislative Correspondent
Nelson, Matthew
Legislative Counsel
Page, Russell
Legislative Correspondent
Page, Russell
Legislative Correspondent
Nelson, Matthew
Legislative Counsel
Lopez, Jeffrey
Legislative Correspondent
Padilla, Matthew
Legislative Assistant
Arias, Lauren
Correspondence Director
Arias, Lauren
Correspondence Director
Goodhart, Fern
Legislative Assistant
Nelson, Matthew
Legislative Counsel
Black, Jonathan
Senior Policy Advisor
Van Theemsche, Lisa
Legislative Correspondent
Lukens, Jeanette
Legislative Assistant
Black, Jonathan
Senior Policy Advisor
Lukens, Jeanette
Legislative Assistant
Van Theemsche, Lisa
Legislative Correspondent
Wallace, Andrew
Legislative Director
Nelson, Matthew
Legislative Counsel
Nelson, Matthew
Legislative Counsel
Cummins, Kevin
Legislative Assistant
Page, Russell
Legislative Correspondent
Goodhart, Fern
Legislative Assistant
Curley, Calvert
Field Representative
Lukens, Jeanette
Legislative Assistant
Lopez, Jeffrey
Legislative Correspondent
Padilla, Matthew
Legislative Assistant
Lukens, Jeanette
Legislative Assistant
Arias, Lauren
Correspondence Director
Nelson, Matthew
Legislative Counsel
Page, Russell
Legislative Correspondent
Arias, Lauren
Correspondence Director
Nelson, Matthew
Legislative Counsel
Page, Russell
Legislative Correspondent
Nelson, Matthew
Legislative Counsel
Page, Russell
Legislative Correspondent
Arias, Lauren
Correspondence Director
Chavez, Margarita
CHCI Graduate Health Fellow
Goodhart, Fern
Legislative Assistant
Nelson, Matthew
Legislative Counsel
Page, Russell
Legislative Correspondent
Lopez, Jeffrey
Legislative Correspondent
Nelson, Matthew
Legislative Counsel
Page, Russell
Legislative Correspondent
Lukens, Jeanette
Legislative Assistant
Cummins, Kevin
Legislative Assistant
Page, Russell
Legislative Correspondent
Curley, Calvert
Field Representative
Page, Russell
Legislative Correspondent
Lopez, Jeffrey
Legislative Correspondent
Padilla, Matthew
Legislative Assistant
Arias, Lauren
Correspondence Director
Goodhart, Fern
Legislative Assistant
Nelson, Matthew
Legislative Counsel
Arias, Lauren
Correspondence Director
Goodhart, Fern
Legislative Assistant
Nelson, Matthew
Legislative Counsel
Lukens, Jeanette
Legislative Assistant
Goodhart, Fern
Legislative Assistant
Goodhart, Fern
Legislative Assistant
Arias, Lauren
Correspondence Director
Chavez, Margarita
CHCI Graduate Health Fellow
Goodhart, Fern
Legislative Assistant
Lopez, Jeffrey
Legislative Correspondent
Padilla, Matthew
Legislative Assistant
Nelson, Matthew
Legislative Counsel
Goodhart, Fern
Legislative Assistant
Lukens, Jeanette
Legislative Assistant
Page, Russell
Legislative Correspondent
Black, Jonathan
Senior Policy Advisor
Lukens, Jeanette
Legislative Assistant
Van Theemsche, Lisa
Legislative Correspondent
Wallace, Andrew
Legislative Director
Page, Russell
Legislative Correspondent
Arias, Lauren
Correspondence Director
Goodhart, Fern
Legislative Assistant
Curley, Calvert
Field Representative
Page, Russell
Legislative Correspondent
Page, Russell
Legislative Correspondent
Page, Russell
Legislative Correspondent
Lopez, Jeffrey
Legislative Correspondent
Nelson, Matthew
Legislative Counsel
Arias, Lauren
Correspondence Director
Goodhart, Fern
Legislative Assistant
Cummins, Kevin
Legislative Assistant
Arias, Lauren
Correspondence Director
Goodhart, Fern
Legislative Assistant
Arias, Lauren
Correspondence Director
Goodhart, Fern
Legislative Assistant
Cummins, Kevin
Legislative Assistant
Page, Russell
Legislative Correspondent
Lopez, Jeffrey
Legislative Correspondent
Cummins, Kevin
Legislative Assistant
Cummins, Kevin
Legislative Assistant
Nelson, Matthew
Legislative Counsel
Page, Russell
Legislative Correspondent
Cummins, Kevin
Legislative Assistant
Page, Russell
Legislative Correspondent
Cummins, Kevin
Legislative Assistant
Page, Russell
Legislative Correspondent
Black, Jonathan
Senior Policy Advisor
Van Theemsche, Lisa
Legislative Correspondent
Padilla, Matthew
Legislative Assistant
Arias, Lauren
Correspondence Director
Goodhart, Fern
Legislative Assistant
Arias, Lauren
Correspondence Director
Black, Jonathan
Senior Policy Advisor
Camacho, Rene
Constituent Services Representative
Carpenter, Jack
Field Representative
Carter, Nicholas
Systems Administrator
Chavez, Margarita
CHCI Graduate Health Fellow
Cobb, Sarah
Field Representative
Cummins, Kevin
Legislative Assistant
Curley, Calvert
Field Representative
Delgado, Leticia
Constituent Services and Community Liaison
Ferrell, Bobbie
Constituent Services Representative
Gasper, Renee
Administrative Director
Ghosh, Deepa
Legislative Fellow
Goodhart, Fern
Legislative Assistant
Goodman, Melanie
Constituent Services Representative
Grajeda, Marco
Field Representative
Lopez, Jeffrey
Legislative Correspondent
Lukens, Jeanette
Legislative Assistant
Miller, Matt
Field Representative; State Scheduler
Morgan, Donda
Scheduler; Executive Assistant
Nelson, Matthew
Legislative Counsel
Padilla, Matthew
Legislative Assistant
Page, Russell
Legislative Correspondent
Sanchez, Carlos
Constituent Services Representative
Sanchez, Joshua
Field Representative
Talhelm, Jen
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Van Theemsche, Lisa
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Wallace, Andrew
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Williams, David
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Wohl, Devon
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Woldman, Bill
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Black, Jonathan
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Talhelm, Jen
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Delgado, Leticia
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Williams, David
State Projects Coordinator
Nelson, Matthew
Legislative Counsel
Arias, Lauren
Correspondence Director
Gasper, Renee
Administrative Director
Morgan, Donda
Scheduler; Executive Assistant
Chavez, Margarita
CHCI Graduate Health Fellow
Ghosh, Deepa
Legislative Fellow
Cummins, Kevin
Legislative Assistant
Goodhart, Fern
Legislative Assistant
Lukens, Jeanette
Legislative Assistant
Padilla, Matthew
Legislative Assistant
Lopez, Jeffrey
Legislative Correspondent
Page, Russell
Legislative Correspondent
Van Theemsche, Lisa
Legislative Correspondent
Wallace, Andrew
Legislative Director
Camacho, Rene
Constituent Services Representative
Carpenter, Jack
Field Representative
Cobb, Sarah
Field Representative
Curley, Calvert
Field Representative
Ferrell, Bobbie
Constituent Services Representative
Goodman, Melanie
Constituent Services Representative
Grajeda, Marco
Field Representative
Miller, Matt
Field Representative; State Scheduler
Sanchez, Carlos
Constituent Services Representative
Sanchez, Joshua
Field Representative
Woldman, Bill
Field Representative
Miller, Matt
Field Representative; State Scheduler
Morgan, Donda
Scheduler; Executive Assistant
Wohl, Devon
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Tom Udall Committees
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Tom Udall Biography
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  • Elected: 2008, term expires 2014, 1st term.
  • State: New Mexico
  • Born: May. 18, 1948, Tucson, AZ
  • Home: Santa Fe
  • Education:

    Prescott Col., B.A. 1970; Cambridge U., B.L. 1975; U. of NM, J.D. 1977

  • Professional Career:

    Law clerk, 10th Circuit Court of Appeals, 1977; Asst. U.S. atty, 1978-81; Practicing atty., 1981-83, 1985-90; Chief cnsl., NM Health & Environment Dept., 1983-84.

  • Political Career:

    NM atty. gen., 1990-98; U.S. House, 1998-2008.

  • Ethnicity: White/Caucasian
  • Religion:

    Mormon

  • Family: Married (Jill Cooper); 1 children

Democrat Tom Udall, New Mexico’s senior senator, was elected to the House in 1998 and to the Senate in 2008. He belongs to a well-known political clan that is sometimes called the “Kennedys of the West.” He is the son of Stewart Udall, the Arizona congressman (1955-61) and U.S. Interior secretary (1961-69), and the nephew of Morris “Mo” Udall, an Arizona congressman (1961-91). He is also the first cousin of Sen. Mark Udall of Colorado, with whom he shares a liberal viewpoint. Read More

Democrat Tom Udall, New Mexico’s senior senator, was elected to the House in 1998 and to the Senate in 2008. He belongs to a well-known political clan that is sometimes called the “Kennedys of the West.” He is the son of Stewart Udall, the Arizona congressman (1955-61) and U.S. Interior secretary (1961-69), and the nephew of Morris “Mo” Udall, an Arizona congressman (1961-91). He is also the first cousin of Sen. Mark Udall of Colorado, with whom he shares a liberal viewpoint.

Tom Udall grew up in Tucson and in McLean, Va., a well-to-do Washington, D.C., suburb. He went to Prescott College in Arizona, got a degree at Cambridge University in England, and graduated from the University of New Mexico Law School. He worked as a law clerk for a federal judge, then as a lawyer in the New Mexico state government before going into private law practice.

Politics was obviously on his mind. He ran for Congress in 1982, when the 3rd District was newly created, and finished last among four candidates, with 13% of the vote. The winner was Democrat Bill Richardson, who went on to become New Mexico’s governor. In 1988, Udall ran in the open, Albuquerque-based 1st District, and won the Democratic nomination, but he lost the general election to Republican Steven Schiff, 51%-47%. In 1990, he was elected state attorney general, and in that role, focused on environmental and consumer protection issues.

In 1997, when Richardson resigned the 3rd District seat, Republican Bill Redmond, an independent Christian minister from Los Alamos, won it in an upset, assisted by a Green Party candidate nominee who won 17%. In 1998, Udall decided he had a shot at the seat, given the district’s heavy ratio of Democrats to Republicans. Drawing on lawyers, the arts community and friends of the Udall family, he raised daunting sums. The Sierra Club and the League of Conservation Voters criticized Redmond and ran waves of ads against him. As for the third-party threat, Udall said, “I intend to make peace with the Greens.” He won with 53% of the vote. Redmond got the same 43% he had won 18 months before, while Green Party nominee Carole Miller saw her 17% evaporate to 4%. Udall won reelection without serious challenges four times.

Udall had a seat on the House Resources Committee, on which his father served and which his uncle chaired. He helped to enact a bill to explore establishment of a national historical park at Los Alamos. With Republican Roscoe Bartlett of Maryland, he formed a bipartisan coalition to seek alternatives to high-priced and finite petroleum resources. Locally, he called for a ban on oil drilling in the Valle Vidal area of the Carson National Forest, which was passed in 2006. On the 2007 energy bill, he sponsored an amendment requiring 15% of electricity to be generated from renewable sources other than nuclear power by 2020. The Democratic leadership supported this amendment, and the bill passed 220-190. But the Senate refused to accept Udall’s proposal, and it was dropped from the legislation that was signed into law.

With a largely liberal voting record, he voted against the Bush administration’s USA PATRIOT Act, which gave law enforcement greatly expanded powers to investigate terrorists. He proposed revisions in the act to limit police authority to obtain search warrants and to restore civil liberty protections for libraries and bookstores. Udall opposed the 2002 Iraq war resolution and called “misguided” a bill to restrict illegal immigrants from obtaining driver’s licenses. After Democrats took control of the House in 2007, Udall secured a seat on the powerful Appropriations Committee.

When Republican Sen. Pete Domenici announced he would not run for reelection in 2008, Republican Reps. Heather Wilson and Steve Pearce immediately jumped into the race; several Democrats, including moderate Albuquerque Mayor Martin Chavez, considered it as well. But Udall was urged to run by Gov. Richardson and Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee Chairman Charles Schumer of New York, and his entry into the race quickly cleared the Democratic field.

Meanwhile, Wilson and Pearce battled for the Republican nomination. Pearce attacked Wilson for supporting the Democrats’ expansion of the State Children’s Health Insurance Program, which he called “socialized medicine,” and for voting to raise taxes. Wilson hit Pearce for votes against additional guards on the U.S. border with Mexico. Domenici endorsed Wilson a few days before the June primary. Still, Pearce still won, 51%-49%.

The primary drained Pearce’s war chest, and Udall was able to significantly outspend him, $7.8 million to $4.6 million. Pearce went on the attack, painting Udall as captive to the liberal wing of the Democratic Party and its “hippie” traditions. A former oil industry executive, Pearce also hammered Udall for his opposition to new oil exploration in environmentally sensitive areas. Udall responded that he was for a “do-it-all” approach to energy. It was apparent long before November that this wasn’t much of a contest. Udall won 61%-39%. Pearce carried only Little Texas in the southeast and the San Juan Basin in the far northwest corner. (Pearce did manage to win back his old House seat in 2010.)

In the Senate, Udall joined his cousin, Mark Udall, who had just won election to a Colorado Senate seat. The two Udalls have worked together closely, but try to avoid serving on the same committees so they can “branch out” and cover a greater range of issues, Tom Udall told National Journal. He has been a more faithful Democrat than his cousin, and he and Connecticut Democrat Richard Blumenthal tied for most-liberal senator in National Journal’s 2012 rankings. In a nod to his state’s rural leanings, however, Udall supports some, but not all, gun control measures backed by other liberals.

He is amiable and avoids fierce rhetoric, which lets him work with senators on the other side of the ideological spectrum. He teamed in 2012 with conservative Republican Jon Kyl of Arizona on a measure to study the Energy Department’s much-criticized National Nuclear Security Administration and with libertarian Rand Paul of Kentucky in 2011 in calling for a faster troop withdrawal from Afghanistan. A Udall amendment providing tax credits for employers hiring military veterans discharged after 2001 was included in the 2009 economic stimulus bill. He was given a seat on the Appropriations Committee in 2013, a vital position for a state as dependent on federal spending as New Mexico.

On the Environment and Public Works Committee, Udall has continued the push he began in the House for a national renewable energy standard. It has encountered resistance from lawmakers who fear their states cannot produce the wind or solar energy necessary to meet such a requirement. But Udall predicts that a law is “just a matter of time,” citing the 30 states with similar standards.

Udall also focuses on consumer-related issues. He asked the Federal Trade Commission in 2011 to investigate misleading safety claims in the sales of football helmets and introduced a 2010 bill requiring new cars to have “black box” data recorders to help investigate crashes. He also introduced a bill in 2011 to crack down on the use of painkillers and performance-enhancing drugs in horse racing. The legislation gained some attention following a New York Times exposé that showed rampant abuses at racetracks, but did not advance. He looks after New Mexico’s tribes as a member of the Indian Affairs Committee, working to add a provision to the health care overhaul for improved Indian medical services.

But Udall has drawn the most attention for his efforts to alter how the Senate conducts its business. Like many senators who come over from the House, he dislikes the frequent use of filibusters to delay or block pending legislation, often resulting in gridlock. At the outset of the 112th Congress (2011-12), he offered a plan that would bar the use of the filibuster on the initial motion to begin debate, but permit lawmakers to filibuster a final bill if they remain on the floor during debate. His plan also would eliminate secret “holds” used to delay nominations of executive branch officials. The Senate fell 16 votes short of the number needed to adopt Udall’s proposed changes.

After Majority Leader Harry Reid said he had reached agreement with Republicans informally on several ways to prevent gridlock in the chamber, Udall vowed to push for further improvements, particularly regarding the reduced number of votes needed to cut off a filibuster. But when the 113th Congress (2013-14) began, Reid said he wasn’t yet ready to abolish the 60-vote rule and unveiled a watered-down series of changes aimed at preventing filibusters. When Paul in March 2013 put one of Udall’s proposed changes into practice by staging a 13-hour talking filibuster, Udall noted that other Republicans continued to silently filibuster judicial nominees. “So on the one hand you’re encouraged, but on the other hand you’re very discouraged,” he said.

Udall is a popular figure in New Mexico, and in 2013, he was in a good position to win reelection the following year.

Show Less
Tom Udall Election Results
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2008 General
Tom Udall (D)
Votes: 505,128
Percent: 61.33%
Spent: $7,447,684
Steve Pearce
Votes: 318,522
Percent: 39.0%
Spent: $4,690,979
2008 Primary
Tom Udall (D)
Votes: 141,629
Percent: 100.0%
Prior Winning Percentages
House: 2006 (75%), 2004 (69%), 2002 (100%), 2000 (67%), 1998 (53%)
Tom Udall Votes and Bills
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National Journal’s rating system is an objective method of analyzing voting. The liberal score means that the lawmaker’s votes were more liberal than that percentage of his colleagues’ votes. The conservative score means his votes were more conservative than that percentage of his colleagues’ votes. The composite score is an average of a lawmaker’s six issue-based scores. See all NJ Voting

More Liberal
More Conservative
2013 2012 2011
Economic 82 (L) : 8 (C) 95 (L) : - (C) 81 (L) : 12 (C)
Social 59 (L) : 39 (C) 64 (L) : - (C) 52 (L) : - (C)
Foreign 66 (L) : 29 (C) 85 (L) : - (C) 92 (L) : - (C)
Composite 71.8 (L) : 28.2 (C) 90.7 (L) : 9.3 (C) 85.5 (L) : 14.5 (C)
Interest Group Ratings

The vote ratings by 10 special interest groups provide insight into a lawmaker’s general ideology and the degree to which he or she agrees with the group’s point of view. Two organizations provide just one combined rating for 2011 and 2012, the two sessions of the 112th Congress. They are the ACLU and the ITIC. About the interest groups.

20112012
FRC140
LCV100100
CFG65
ITIC-75
NTU96
20112012
COC55-
ACLU-75
ACU50
ADA95100
AFSCME100-
Key Senate Votes

The key votes show how a member of Congress voted on the major bills of the year. N indicates a "no" vote; Y a "yes" vote. If a member voted "present" or was absent, the bill caption is not shown. For a complete description of the bills included in key votes, see the Almanac's Guide to Usage.

    • End fiscal cliff
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Block faith exemptions
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Approve gas pipeline
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • Approve farm bill
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Let cyber bill proceed
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Block Gitmo transfers
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • Raise debt limit
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Pass balanced budget amendment
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Stop EPA climate regulations
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Proceed to Cordray vote
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Require talking filibuster
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Limit Fannie/Freddie
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Regulate financial firms
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2010
    • Pass tax cuts for some
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2010
    • Legalize immigrants' kids
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2010
    • Ratify New START
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2010
    • Confirm Elena Kagan
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2010
    • Stop EPA climate regs
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2010
    • Repeal don't ask, tell
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2010
    • Overturn Ledbetter
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Block release of TARP funds
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Pass $787 billion stimulus
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Repeal DC gun laws
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Confirm Sonia Sotomayor
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Pass health care bill
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Bar budget rules for climate bill
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Pass 2010 budget resolution
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Let judges adjust mortgages
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Allow FDA to regulate tobacco
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Protect gays from hate crimes
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Cut F-22 funds
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Label North Korea terrorist state
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Build Guantanamo replacement
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Allow federal funds for abortion
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
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The Almanac is a members-only database of searchable profiles compiled and adapted from the Almanac of American Politics. Comprehensive online profiles include biographical and political summaries of elected officials, campaign expenditures, voting records, interest-group ratings, and congressional staff look-ups. In-depth overviews of each state and house district are included as well, along with demographic data, analysis of voting trends, and political histories.
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