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Republican

Rep. Mac Thornberry (R)

Mac Thornberry Contact
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Email: n/a
DC Contact Information

Phone: 202-225-3706

Address: 2329 RHOB, DC 20515

State Office Contact Information

Phone: (806) 371-8844

Address: 620 South Taylor Street, Amarillo TX 79101

Wichita Falls TX

Phone: (940) 692-1700

Fax: (940) 692-0539

Address: 2525 Kell Boulevard, Wichita Falls TX 76308-1061

Mac Thornberry Staff
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Sort by INTEREST NAME TITLE
Igleheart, Alexandra
Senior Legislative Assistant
Seeds, Michael
Deputy Chief of Staff; Legislative Director
Igleheart, Alexandra
Senior Legislative Assistant
Igleheart, Alexandra
Senior Legislative Assistant
Igleheart, Alexandra
Senior Legislative Assistant
Igleheart, Alexandra
Senior Legislative Assistant
Igleheart, Alexandra
Senior Legislative Assistant
Igleheart, Alexandra
Senior Legislative Assistant
Igleheart, Alexandra
Senior Legislative Assistant
Rein, Scott
Air Force Fellow
Igleheart, Alexandra
Senior Legislative Assistant
Igleheart, Alexandra
Senior Legislative Assistant
Rein, Scott
Air Force Fellow
Igleheart, Alexandra
Senior Legislative Assistant
Seeds, Michael
Deputy Chief of Staff; Legislative Director
Seeds, Michael
Deputy Chief of Staff; Legislative Director
Igleheart, Alexandra
Senior Legislative Assistant
Igleheart, Alexandra
Senior Legislative Assistant
Seeds, Michael
Deputy Chief of Staff; Legislative Director
Igleheart, Alexandra
Senior Legislative Assistant
Igleheart, Alexandra
Senior Legislative Assistant
Igleheart, Alexandra
Senior Legislative Assistant
Seeds, Michael
Deputy Chief of Staff; Legislative Director
Igleheart, Alexandra
Senior Legislative Assistant
Igleheart, Alexandra
Senior Legislative Assistant
Igleheart, Alexandra
Senior Legislative Assistant
Igleheart, Alexandra
Senior Legislative Assistant
Igleheart, Alexandra
Senior Legislative Assistant
Rein, Scott
Air Force Fellow
Igleheart, Alexandra
Senior Legislative Assistant
Seeds, Michael
Deputy Chief of Staff; Legislative Director
Igleheart, Alexandra
Senior Legislative Assistant
Igleheart, Alexandra
Senior Legislative Assistant
Seeds, Michael
Deputy Chief of Staff; Legislative Director
Seeds, Michael
Deputy Chief of Staff; Legislative Director
Seeds, Michael
Deputy Chief of Staff; Legislative Director
Rein, Scott
Air Force Fellow
Seeds, Michael
Deputy Chief of Staff; Legislative Director
Seeds, Michael
Deputy Chief of Staff; Legislative Director
Seeds, Michael
Deputy Chief of Staff; Legislative Director
Seeds, Michael
Deputy Chief of Staff; Legislative Director
Igleheart, Alexandra
Senior Legislative Assistant
Igleheart, Alexandra
Senior Legislative Assistant
Igleheart, Alexandra
Senior Legislative Assistant
Igleheart, Alexandra
Senior Legislative Assistant
Seeds, Michael
Deputy Chief of Staff; Legislative Director
Igleheart, Alexandra
Senior Legislative Assistant
Bender, Nicole
Press Assistant
Seeds, Michael
Deputy Chief of Staff; Legislative Director
Bender, Nicole
Press Assistant
Igleheart, Alexandra
Senior Legislative Assistant
Igleheart, Alexandra
Senior Legislative Assistant
Igleheart, Alexandra
Senior Legislative Assistant
Igleheart, Alexandra
Senior Legislative Assistant
Igleheart, Alexandra
Senior Legislative Assistant
Seeds, Michael
Deputy Chief of Staff; Legislative Director
Rein, Scott
Air Force Fellow
Seeds, Michael
Deputy Chief of Staff; Legislative Director
Igleheart, Alexandra
Senior Legislative Assistant
Barber, Danelle
Constituent Services Representative
Bender, Nicole
Press Assistant
Corley, Jon
Press Secretary
Hensarling, Lauren
Executive Assistant; Administrative Assistant; Office Manager
Igleheart, Alexandra
Senior Legislative Assistant
Kalka, Melissa
Constituent Services Representative
Lackey, Jayla
Staff Assistant
Lopez, Jose
Constituent Services Representative
Lytle, Michael
Constituent Services Representative
Martin, Josh
Chief of Staff
Pool, Caleb
Constituent Services Representative
Rein, Scott
Air Force Fellow
Ross, Sandra
District Director
Seeds, Michael
Deputy Chief of Staff; Legislative Director
Simpson, Paul
Deputy District Director
Hensarling, Lauren
Executive Assistant; Administrative Assistant; Office Manager
Martin, Josh
Chief of Staff
Seeds, Michael
Deputy Chief of Staff; Legislative Director
Simpson, Paul
Deputy District Director
Ross, Sandra
District Director
Hensarling, Lauren
Executive Assistant; Administrative Assistant; Office Manager
Rein, Scott
Air Force Fellow
Igleheart, Alexandra
Senior Legislative Assistant
Seeds, Michael
Deputy Chief of Staff; Legislative Director
Hensarling, Lauren
Executive Assistant; Administrative Assistant; Office Manager
Bender, Nicole
Press Assistant
Corley, Jon
Press Secretary
Barber, Danelle
Constituent Services Representative
Kalka, Melissa
Constituent Services Representative
Lopez, Jose
Constituent Services Representative
Lytle, Michael
Constituent Services Representative
Pool, Caleb
Constituent Services Representative
Lackey, Jayla
Staff Assistant
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Mac Thornberry Committees
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Armed Services (Chairman)
Mac Thornberry Biography
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  • Elected: 1994, 11th term.
  • District: Texas 13
  • Born: Jul. 15, 1958, Clarendon
  • Home: Clarendon
  • Education:

    TX Tech. U., B.A. 1980, U. of TX, J.D. 1983

  • Professional Career:

    Legis. cnsl., U.S. Rep. Tom Loeffler, 1983–85; Chief of staff, U.S. Rep. Larry Combest, 1985–88; Dpty. asst. secy. of state for Legis. Affairs, 1988–89; Practicing atty., 1989–94; Rancher 1989-94.

  • Ethnicity: White/Caucasian
  • Religion:

    Presbyterian

  • Family: Married (Sally); 2 children

Mac Thornberry, first elected in 1994, is considered one of Congress’ brainiest and most thoughtful Republicans on national and domestic security issues. He capped a long tenure on the House Armed Services Committee by assuming the chairmanship in 2015, becoming the first Texan to hold that post. Read More

Mac Thornberry, first elected in 1994, is considered one of Congress’ brainiest and most thoughtful Republicans on national and domestic security issues. He capped a long tenure on the House Armed Services Committee by assuming the chairmanship in 2015, becoming the first Texan to hold that post.

His great-great-grandfather, Amos Thornberry, a Union Army veteran and staunch Republican, moved to Clay County, just east of Wichita Falls, in the 1880s. A year after Amos died in 1925, his son bought the cattle ranch that Mac Thornberry, his brothers, and father now run. After college and law school in Texas, Thornberry worked for Texas Republican Reps. Tom Loeffler and Larry Combest. He returned to practice law in West Texas, and in 1994, challenged Democratic Rep. Bill Sarpalius, whom he attacked for voting for President Bill Clinton’s budget and tax legislation. He also profited from news stories that said Sarpalius failed to pay a company that moved him to Washington, and then accepted a fee for speaking at the company’s convention in Las Vegas. Thornberry won 55%-45%, and has rolled up large reelection margins ever since.

In the House, Thornberry has a solidly conservative voting record, though he is hardly the most ideological Republican in the Texas delegation. In keeping with his scholarly nature, his official website includes an essay explaining his philosophy and his interest “in continuing to push government to work smarter and more efficiently.” He told National Journal that he spends an increasing amount of time dispelling inaccurate rumors from constituents that reach his office, such as one in 2012 that the Homeland Security Department was stockpiling ammunition to create a private army. To further discourage such talk, “one thing we (lawmakers) can do is not feed the beast,” he said. “It’s tempting to play to the crowd, and they may whoop and holler and love you for it. But you’re doing people a disservice.”

In taking over at Armed Services, Thornberry quickly made clear that he would seek to be a firm check on the Obama administration. "Congress is sometimes criticized for exercising its proper role in defense," he said in a forceful January 2015 speech, citing Capitol Hill's decision to block the Pentagon's decision to shut down the country's lone tank-production line and its insistence on using Predator drones as a weapon against terrorists. At the same time, though, he acknowledged that Congress can be "parochial" and get things wrong. And he told Politico he was open to "any solution" that would stave off the steep budget cuts under sequestration. He said he wasn't advocating a tax increase, but acknowledged that higher revenues were going to be part of any conversation with President Obama.

Thornberry has often been at the forefront of security issues. In 2002, after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, he played a key role in the establishment of the new Homeland Security Department. In January 2011, he took over as chairman of the Armed Services’ terrorism panel, and Speaker John Boehner also asked him to lead an effort to develop a cyber security strategy for the country. The House in 2012 passed a series of bills based on his task force’s recommendations that were in keeping with his desire to take up issues in “bite-sized chunks” rather than in a single sweeping measure. But partisan disagreements stalled action in the Senate. Earlier, as a member of the Intelligence Committee, Thornberry criticized delays in integrating computer networks and intelligence analyses at Homeland Security. He also has championed missile defense and called for better coordination of military space programs.

Thornberry’s district includes the Pantex Plant, the nation’s only nuclear weapons assembly and disassembly facility. He sought in the 113th Congress (2013-14) to improve operations at the Energy Department’s National Nuclear Security Administration, which has drawn bipartisan criticism for its safety and security policies. He was critical of Obama’s arms control deal with Russia in 2010 for precluding the use of nuclear weapons against non-nuclear nations. He also was critical of the amount of input that the administration gave Congress about the use of unmanned drone aircraft to attack suspected terrorists and added language to the defense authorization bill in 2013 to require that lawmakers be promptly notified of sensitive military operations outside of Afghanistan, including drone strikes.

Despite his expertise on security matters, he lost his bid in 2009 to chair the full Armed Services Committee to Buck McKeon, R-Calif., who had more seniority. But he and McKeon developed a good working relationship, and the chairman named Thornberry in October 2013 to lead a long-term effort to reform the Pentagon's acquisition programs. Thornberry told Federal Computer Week that he wanted to seek to change the underlying principles of acquisition instead of merely trying to eliminate wasteful programs. "I think the key is looking … to the incentives that exist in the system, both on the side of government and on the side of industry," he said. "So there's no new oversight office, no new regulation, no elimination of regulation, that's really going to get at the heart of the matter if the incentives for the program manager or for industry are going to stay the way they are."

Even before McKeon officially announced his retirement, he made it known that he wanted Thornberry to be his successor. Thornberry elevated his public profile to some degree, giving a May 2014 Heritage Foundation speech that amounted to a GOP rebuttal of Obama's address on foreign policy at West Point. He accused the president of believing he could influence security simply by “giving a speech” and that when it came to achieving U.S. objectives in Afghanistan, "his heart just isn't in it." He later called for the administration to take a tougher approach against the Islamic State terrorist organization, telling Fox News in August: "The president is going to have to reassure other countries, including the Iraqis, that if we get into this, we're in it to stay; we're not going to cut and run like we have before."

On domestic issues, Thornberry has pressed for repeal of the estate tax and adoption of a national sales tax. In 2010, he got a bill into law expanding access to state veterans’ homes for parents whose children died while serving in the military. He introduced a bill in January 2011 to help states set up special health care courts staffed by judges with health policy expertise. The judges would serve as an alternative to juries that Republicans say are inclined to award unnecessarily large damage amounts in malpractice cases. Another bill of his in 2013 would set up a two-year budget cycle, an idea that outside government reform groups long have said would make the budget process run far more smoothly.

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Mac Thornberry Election Results
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2012 General
Mac Thornberry (R)
Votes: 187,775
Percent: 90.98%
John Deek (Lib)
Votes: 12,701
Percent: 6.15%
Keith Houston (Green)
Votes: 5,912
Percent: 2.86%
2012 Primary
Mac Thornberry (R)
Votes: 47,051
Percent: 77.53%
Pam Barlow (R)
Votes: 13,637
Percent: 22.47%
Prior Winning Percentages
2010 (87%), 2008 (78%), 2006 (74%), 2004 (92%), 2002 (79%), 2000 (68%), 1998 (68%), 1996 (67%), 1994 (55%)
Mac Thornberry Votes and Bills
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National Journal’s rating system is an objective method of analyzing voting. The liberal score means that the lawmaker’s votes were more liberal than that percentage of his colleagues’ votes. The conservative score means his votes were more conservative than that percentage of his colleagues’ votes. The composite score is an average of a lawmaker’s six issue-based scores. See all NJ Voting

More Liberal
More Conservative
2013 2012 2011
Economic 7 (L) : 92 (C) 15 (L) : 81 (C) 10 (L) : 83 (C)
Social 27 (L) : 71 (C) 18 (L) : 80 (C) - (L) : 83 (C)
Foreign 34 (L) : 60 (C) 28 (L) : 70 (C) 47 (L) : 51 (C)
Composite 24.2 (L) : 75.8 (C) 21.7 (L) : 78.3 (C) 23.3 (L) : 76.7 (C)
Interest Group Ratings

The vote ratings by 10 special interest groups provide insight into a lawmaker’s general ideology and the degree to which he or she agrees with the group’s point of view. Two organizations provide just one combined rating for 2011 and 2012, the two sessions of the 112th Congress. They are the ACLU and the ITIC. About the interest groups.

20112012
FRC9083
LCV63
CFG7481
ITIC-83
NTU7778
20112012
COC100-
ACLU-0
ACU8896
ADA00
AFSCME0-
Key House Votes

The key votes show how a member of Congress voted on the major bills of the year. N indicates a "no" vote; Y a "yes" vote. If a member voted "present" or was absent, the bill caption is not shown. For a complete description of the bills included in key votes, see the Almanac's Guide to Usage.

    • Pass GOP budget
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • End fiscal cliff
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Extend payroll tax cut
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • Find AG in contempt
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Stop student loan hike
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Repeal health care
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Raise debt limit
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Pass cut, cap, balance
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Defund Planned Parenthood
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Repeal lightbulb ban
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Add endangered listings
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Speed troop withdrawal
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Regulate financial firms
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2010
    • Pass tax cuts for some
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2010
    • Stop detainee transfers
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2010
    • Legalize immigrants' kids
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2010
    • Repeal don't ask, tell
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2010
    • Limit campaign funds
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2010
    • Overturn Ledbetter
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Pass $820 billion stimulus
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Let guns in national parks
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Pass cap-and-trade
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Bar federal abortion funds
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Pass health care bill
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Bail out financial markets
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2008
    • Repeal D.C. gun law
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2008
    • Overhaul FISA
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2008
    • Increase minimum wage
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • Expand SCHIP
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • Raise CAFE standards
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • Share immigration data
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
    • Foreign aid abortion ban
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
    • Ban gay bias in workplace
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • Withdraw troops 8/08
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • No operations in Iran
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • Free trade with Peru
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
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The Almanac is a members-only database of searchable profiles compiled and adapted from the Almanac of American Politics. Comprehensive online profiles include biographical and political summaries of elected officials, campaign expenditures, voting records, interest-group ratings, and congressional staff look-ups. In-depth overviews of each state and house district are included as well, along with demographic data, analysis of voting trends, and political histories.
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