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Democrat

Rep. Tim Ryan (D)

Tim Ryan Contact
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DC Contact Information

Phone: 202-225-5261

Address: 1421 LHOB, DC 20515

State Office Contact Information

Phone: (800) 856-4152

Address: 197 West Market Street, Warren OH 44481-1024

Youngstown OH

Phone: (330) 740-0193

Fax: (330) 740-0182

Address: 241 West Federal Street, Youngstown OH 44503-1207

Akron OH

Phone: (330) 630-7311

Fax: (330) 630-7314

Address: 1030 East Tallmadge Avenue, Akron OH 44310-3563

Tim Ryan Staff
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Keating, Ryan
Legislative Director
Sokolov, Anne
Senior Legislative Assistant
Sokolov, Anne
Senior Legislative Assistant
Sokolov, Anne
Senior Legislative Assistant
Sokolov, Anne
Senior Legislative Assistant
Sokolov, Anne
Senior Legislative Assistant
Sokolov, Anne
Senior Legislative Assistant
Sokolov, Anne
Senior Legislative Assistant
Keating, Ryan
Legislative Director
Sokolov, Anne
Senior Legislative Assistant
Sokolov, Anne
Senior Legislative Assistant
Sokolov, Anne
Senior Legislative Assistant
Sokolov, Anne
Senior Legislative Assistant
Sokolov, Anne
Senior Legislative Assistant
Keating, Ryan
Legislative Director
Sokolov, Anne
Senior Legislative Assistant
Sokolov, Anne
Senior Legislative Assistant
Sokolov, Anne
Senior Legislative Assistant
Sokolov, Anne
Senior Legislative Assistant
Zetts, Michael
Press Secretary
Sokolov, Anne
Senior Legislative Assistant
Keating, Ryan
Legislative Director
Sokolov, Anne
Senior Legislative Assistant
Sokolov, Anne
Senior Legislative Assistant
Sokolov, Anne
Senior Legislative Assistant
Keating, Ryan
Legislative Director
Sokolov, Anne
Senior Legislative Assistant
Keating, Ryan
Legislative Director
Sokolov, Anne
Senior Legislative Assistant
Zetts, Michael
Press Secretary
Keating, Ryan
Legislative Director
Sokolov, Anne
Senior Legislative Assistant
Keating, Ryan
Legislative Director
Sokolov, Anne
Senior Legislative Assistant
Sokolov, Anne
Senior Legislative Assistant
Keating, Ryan
Legislative Director
Sokolov, Anne
Senior Legislative Assistant
Sokolov, Anne
Senior Legislative Assistant
Zetts, Michael
Press Secretary
Zetts, Michael
Press Secretary
Sokolov, Anne
Senior Legislative Assistant
Sokolov, Anne
Senior Legislative Assistant
Sokolov, Anne
Senior Legislative Assistant
Sokolov, Anne
Senior Legislative Assistant
Sokolov, Anne
Senior Legislative Assistant
Sokolov, Anne
Senior Legislative Assistant
Zetts, Michael
Press Secretary
Sokolov, Anne
Senior Legislative Assistant
Sokolov, Anne
Senior Legislative Assistant
Sokolov, Anne
Senior Legislative Assistant
Sokolov, Anne
Senior Legislative Assistant
Sokolov, Anne
Senior Legislative Assistant
Sokolov, Anne
Senior Legislative Assistant
Sokolov, Anne
Senior Legislative Assistant
Sokolov, Anne
Senior Legislative Assistant
Sokolov, Anne
Senior Legislative Assistant
Sokolov, Anne
Senior Legislative Assistant
Sokolov, Anne
Senior Legislative Assistant
Zetts, Michael
Press Secretary
Sokolov, Anne
Senior Legislative Assistant
Sokolov, Anne
Senior Legislative Assistant
Keating, Ryan
Legislative Director
Sokolov, Anne
Senior Legislative Assistant
Sokolov, Anne
Senior Legislative Assistant
Keating, Ryan
Legislative Director
Sokolov, Anne
Senior Legislative Assistant
Sokolov, Anne
Senior Legislative Assistant
Sokolov, Anne
Senior Legislative Assistant
Sokolov, Anne
Senior Legislative Assistant
Keating, Ryan
Legislative Director
Sokolov, Anne
Senior Legislative Assistant
Breck, Catey
Economic Development Coordinator
Callion, Mark
Community Development Liaison
Crockett, Gene
Constituent Services Liaison
Grimes, Ron
Chief of Staff
Hayes, Debbie
Office Manager; Scheduler
Isenberg, Erin
Executive Assistant
Keating, Ryan
Legislative Director
Leonard, Rick
District Director
Lowry, Patrick
Communications Director
Price, Crystal
Staff Assistant
Sokolov, Anne
Senior Legislative Assistant
Vadas, Matthew
Constituent Liaison
Wigley, Pearlette
Constituent Liaison
Zetts, Michael
Press Secretary
Grimes, Ron
Chief of Staff
Lowry, Patrick
Communications Director
Breck, Catey
Economic Development Coordinator
Leonard, Rick
District Director
Isenberg, Erin
Executive Assistant
Sokolov, Anne
Senior Legislative Assistant
Keating, Ryan
Legislative Director
Callion, Mark
Community Development Liaison
Crockett, Gene
Constituent Services Liaison
Vadas, Matthew
Constituent Liaison
Wigley, Pearlette
Constituent Liaison
Hayes, Debbie
Office Manager; Scheduler
Zetts, Michael
Press Secretary
Hayes, Debbie
Office Manager; Scheduler
Price, Crystal
Staff Assistant
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Tim Ryan Committees
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Tim Ryan Biography
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  • Elected: 2002, 6th term.
  • District: Ohio 13
  • Born: Jul. 16, 1973, Niles
  • Home: Niles
  • Education:

    Bowling Green St. U., B.A. 1995, Franklin Pierce Law Ctr., J.D. 2000

  • Professional Career:

    Aide, U.S. Rep. Jim Traficant, 1995-97.

  • Political Career:

    OH Senate, 2000-02.

  • Ethnicity: White/Caucasian
  • Religion:

    Catholic

  • Family: Married (Andrea)

Tim Ryan, a Democrat elected in 2002 at age 29, is a pro-union, anti-abortion centrist. That combination has propelled other Ohioans to higher office, and Ryan is considered likely to attempt to go that route in the future. Read More

Tim Ryan, a Democrat elected in 2002 at age 29, is a pro-union, anti-abortion centrist. That combination has propelled other Ohioans to higher office, and Ryan is considered likely to attempt to go that route in the future.

Ryan grew up in Niles, was a star quarterback before a knee injury ended his career, and graduated from Bowling Green State University. His first job was with 17th District Rep. James Traficant, a Democrat later convicted of racketeering and bribery. In 2000, after graduating from Franklin Pierce Law Center, Ryan was elected to the state Senate. His opening to run for Congress came when Traficant was forced to resign in disgrace after his conviction in 2002. For years, Traficant had been a colorful if coarse figure in the House, whose ranting orations (“Beam me up, Scotty” was his expression of incredulity at hearing an opposing viewpoint) were a regular source of fascination for C-SPAN viewers.

Most 17th District insiders thought Akron-based Rep. Tom Sawyer, a Democrat who had been thrown into the district by reapportionment after the 2000 census, had the inside track to succeed Traficant. And by standard measures, Sawyer should have won easily: He outspent Ryan nearly 6-to-1. But his record on issues gave Ryan an opening. Sawyer had voted for the 1993 North American Free Trade Agreement, and he was one of the few Rust Belt Democrats to vote for normalizing trade relations with China. Ryan hammered on these votes in the Mahoning Valley, where it is gospel that free trade drove the region’s high-paying jobs abroad. Ryan also got the endorsement of the National Rifle Association in a district with many hunters. He beat Sawyer 41%-27%.

The Republican nominee was state Rep. Ann Womer Benjamin. Ryan slammed her and the Ohio Republican Legislature for votes that had led to higher tuition at state universities. Republicans fired back with ads highlighting several disorderly conduct charges lodged against Ryan while he was in college. The district’s Democratic leanings and Ryan’s labor support proved decisive. He won 51% of the vote to 34% for Womer Benjamin and 15% for Traficant, who ran as an independent even though he’d been carted off to jail.

Ryan has leaned to the left on economic and foreign policy, while his splits with Democrats on abortion rights and gun control have placed him closer to the center on social issues. After the deadly school massacre in Newtown, Conn., he held meetings with gun enthusiasts and law enforcement officials to try to “thread the needle” on a solution to gun violence. With abortion-rights advocate Rosa DeLauro, D-Conn., he sponsored the “Reducing the Need for Abortion and Supporting Parents Act,” with federal dollars to fight teen pregnancy and increased aid for women who become pregnant; Democratic activists depicted this as a move toward party consensus on a difficult issue. He also refused to join most Republicans in 2011 in voting to defund Planned Parenthood.

Worried about the loss of local call-center jobs, Ryan was one of just seven House members who voted against the national do-not-call list. For several years, he sponsored the Chinese Currency Act, which sought to counter China’s alleged manipulation and undervaluation of its currency.

He was a vocal backer of the powerful Pennsylvania Democrat John Murtha in his unsuccessful bid against Maryland’s Steny Hoyer for majority leader in 2006, which endeared him to Murtha-backer Nancy Pelosi, the rising House speaker, and earned Ryan a coveted seat on the House Appropriations Committee. He immediately went to work securing earmarked projects for his hard-pressed district, including more than $26 million in 2007 alone. He lost his seat on the panel when Republicans took majority control in 2011, but regained it two years later.

Much of the recent attention Ryan has drawn has stemmed not from legislation, but from meditation. He attended a five-day retreat after the 2008 election, turning off his two BlackBerrys and gradually reducing how often he talked until he maintained a 36-hour period of silence. “My mind and body were in the same place at the same time, synchronized in a way I had rarely experienced,” he told the Akron Beacon Journal. He wrote a book in 2012, A Mindful Nation: How a Simple Practice Can Help Us Reduce Stress, Improve Performance, and Recapture the American Spirit, and he now spends 45 minutes a day practicing “mindfulness”— something he says stressed-out Washingtonians and corporate executives should try. But Ryan also drew unwanted attention in 2012 when he was arrested in August for public intoxication in Virginia. The charges were later dismissed.

Ryan has not faced serious reelection problems. He considered a run for the Senate in 2006 but decided against it. Democratic Gov. Ted Strickland discussed a shared ticket with Ryan in 2010, but Ryan decided to remain in the House, largely because of his new assignment on Appropriations. He took a serious look at running for governor in 2014 after Strickland said that he wouldn’t run again, but announced in March 2013 that the risk still wasn’t worth giving up his Appropriations seat.

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Tim Ryan Election Results
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2012 General
Tim Ryan (D)
Votes: 235,492
Percent: 72.77%
Marisha Agana (R)
Votes: 88,120
Percent: 27.23%
2012 Primary
Tim Ryan (D)
Votes: 56,670
Percent: 100.0%
Prior Winning Percentages
2010 (54%), 2008 (78%), 2006 (80%), 2004 (77%), 2002 (51%)
Tim Ryan Votes and Bills
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National Journal’s rating system is an objective method of analyzing voting. The liberal score means that the lawmaker’s votes were more liberal than that percentage of his colleagues’ votes. The conservative score means his votes were more conservative than that percentage of his colleagues’ votes. The composite score is an average of a lawmaker’s six issue-based scores. See all NJ Voting

More Liberal
More Conservative
2013 2012 2011
Economic 71 (L) : 29 (C) 79 (L) : 19 (C) 67 (L) : 32 (C)
Social 69 (L) : 28 (C) 65 (L) : 34 (C) 66 (L) : 33 (C)
Foreign 58 (L) : 42 (C) 67 (L) : 33 (C) 76 (L) : 23 (C)
Composite 66.5 (L) : 33.5 (C) 70.8 (L) : 29.2 (C) 70.2 (L) : 29.8 (C)
Interest Group Ratings

The vote ratings by 10 special interest groups provide insight into a lawmaker’s general ideology and the degree to which he or she agrees with the group’s point of view. Two organizations provide just one combined rating for 2011 and 2012, the two sessions of the 112th Congress. They are the ACLU and the ITIC. About the interest groups.

20112012
FRC100
LCV9780
CFG1712
ITIC-33
NTU1812
20112012
COC13-
ACLU-100
ACU1212
ADA9090
AFSCME100-
Key House Votes

The key votes show how a member of Congress voted on the major bills of the year. N indicates a "no" vote; Y a "yes" vote. If a member voted "present" or was absent, the bill caption is not shown. For a complete description of the bills included in key votes, see the Almanac's Guide to Usage.

    • Pass GOP budget
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • End fiscal cliff
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Extend payroll tax cut
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • Find AG in contempt
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • Stop student loan hike
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • Repeal health care
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • Raise debt limit
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Pass cut, cap, balance
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Defund Planned Parenthood
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Repeal lightbulb ban
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Add endangered listings
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Speed troop withdrawal
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Regulate financial firms
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2010
    • Pass tax cuts for some
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2010
    • Stop detainee transfers
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2010
    • Legalize immigrants' kids
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2010
    • Repeal don't ask, tell
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2010
    • Limit campaign funds
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2010
    • Overturn Ledbetter
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Pass $820 billion stimulus
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Let guns in national parks
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Pass cap-and-trade
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Bar federal abortion funds
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Pass health care bill
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Bail out financial markets
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2008
    • Repeal D.C. gun law
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2008
    • Overhaul FISA
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2008
    • Increase minimum wage
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
    • Expand SCHIP
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
    • Raise CAFE standards
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
    • Share immigration data
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • Foreign aid abortion ban
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • Ban gay bias in workplace
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
    • Withdraw troops 8/08
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
    • No operations in Iran
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
    • Free trade with Peru
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
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The Almanac is a members-only database of searchable profiles compiled and adapted from the Almanac of American Politics. Comprehensive online profiles include biographical and political summaries of elected officials, campaign expenditures, voting records, interest-group ratings, and congressional staff look-ups. In-depth overviews of each state and house district are included as well, along with demographic data, analysis of voting trends, and political histories.
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