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Republican

Rep. Tom Price (R)

Tom Price Contact
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Email: n/a
DC Contact Information

Phone: 202-225-4501

Address: 100 CHOB, DC 20515

State Office Contact Information

Phone: (770) 998-0049

Address: 85-C Mill Street, Roswell GA 30075

Tom Price Staff
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Zebley, Kyle
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Brooks, Ryan
Legislative Correspondent; Field Representative
Foster, Cheyenne
Executive Assistant; Scheduler
Graf, Meghan
Staff Assistant; Intern Coordinator
Long, Kelle
Director of Social Media
McCloud, Hayley
Legislative Correspondent; Field Representative
McGowan, Kyle
Deputy Chief of Staff
McIntosh, Tina
Office Manager; Constituent Services Representative
Murphy, Ryan
Communications Director
Poole, Jennifer
Constituent Services Director
Skrzycki, Kris
Chief of Staff
Zebley, Kyle
Legislative Director
Skrzycki, Kris
Chief of Staff
Murphy, Ryan
Communications Director
Graf, Meghan
Staff Assistant; Intern Coordinator
McGowan, Kyle
Deputy Chief of Staff
Long, Kelle
Director of Social Media
Poole, Jennifer
Constituent Services Director
Foster, Cheyenne
Executive Assistant; Scheduler
Brooks, Ryan
Legislative Correspondent; Field Representative
McCloud, Hayley
Legislative Correspondent; Field Representative
Zebley, Kyle
Legislative Director
McIntosh, Tina
Office Manager; Constituent Services Representative
Brooks, Ryan
Legislative Correspondent; Field Representative
McCloud, Hayley
Legislative Correspondent; Field Representative
McIntosh, Tina
Office Manager; Constituent Services Representative
Foster, Cheyenne
Executive Assistant; Scheduler
Graf, Meghan
Staff Assistant; Intern Coordinator
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Tom Price Committees
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Budget (Chairman)
Tom Price Biography
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  • Elected: 2004, 5th term.
  • District: Georgia 6
  • Born: Oct. 08, 1954, Lansing, MI
  • Home: Roswell
  • Education:

    U. of MI, B.A. 1976, M.D. 1979

  • Professional Career:

    Practicing orthopedic surgeon, 1979-2002; Asst. prof., Emory U., 2002-present.

  • Political Career:

    GA Senate, 1996-2004; Maj. ldr., 2002-03.

  • Ethnicity: White/Caucasian
  • Religion:

    Presbyterian

  • Family: Married (Elizabeth); 1 children

Tom Price, a Republican first elected in 2004, has become one of the leading spokesmen for his party’s conservative message. His stridency can put him at odds with the House Republican leadership, and he waged an unsuccessful bid in 2012 for Republican Conference chairman against an ally of Speaker John Boehner. He decided against running for another leadership post or for the Senate in 2014 to position himself to succeed Paul Ryan as the next House Budget Committee chairman. Read More

Tom Price, a Republican first elected in 2004, has become one of the leading spokesmen for his party’s conservative message. His stridency can put him at odds with the House Republican leadership, and he waged an unsuccessful bid in 2012 for Republican Conference chairman against an ally of Speaker John Boehner. He decided against running for another leadership post or for the Senate in 2014 to position himself to succeed Paul Ryan as the next House Budget Committee chairman.

Price grew up in Michigan and graduated from the University of Michigan and its medical school. His father and grandfather were both physicians. He did his residency in orthopedic surgery at Emory Medical School and then moved to Roswell, where he was involved in civic affairs and was president of the Rotary Club. Working closely with the Medical Association of Georgia, he campaigned locally against President Bill Clinton’s health care plan in the early 1990s. When a seat opened in the state Senate in 1996, he was elected and quickly moved up the leadership ranks to become majority leader when Republicans captured the Senate in 2002 for the first time since Reconstruction.

When Republican Rep. Johnny Isakson announced he was running for the Senate seat being vacated by Democrat Zell Miller, the contest for this heavily Republican open seat was hard-fought and big-spending. Three state senators ran—Price from Fulton County, and Robert Lamutt and Chuck Clay from Cobb County. Price spent $499,000 of his own money and contrasted his work in medicine with the legal and business careers of his two main opponents. He highlighted his fiscal conservatism and strong support for limiting jury awards in malpractice suits, a position that won him considerable support from the medical community. Calling the federal income tax “broken,” he supported a national retail sales tax. He said that he had “a surgeon’s mentality. … I get things done.”

Price led the first round of the primary with 35% of the vote; Lamutt made it into the runoff with 28%. Lamutt, who gave $1.5 million to his campaign, criticized Price as a “special interest” candidate because he raised large sums from fellow doctors. He also attacked Price’s 2003 support for a 25-cent tax increase on cigarettes. Price defended his vote as a tool to reduce local property taxes. In the runoff,Price won 54%-46%.

In the House, Price was among the Tea Party Caucus’ original members and tied for most-conservative House member in National Journal’s 2011 vote rankings. He also had, by mid-2014, a lifetime score of 93 percent from the anti-tax group Club for Growth. Price has advocated the abolition of the Internal Revenue Service and replacing almost all taxes with a national sales tax. He told Fox News after President Barack Obama was reelected in 2012 that he disagreed with Boehner’s position to abandon efforts to repeal Obama’s health care reform law. He introduced his own legislation to create tax incentives for consumers to purchase insurance on the individual insurance market.

In 2010, Price became chairman of the House Republican Policy Committee, the party’s in-house idea factory. He focused on health care and energy policy, repeatedly calling for more domestic oil and gas production. During negotiations over raising the federal debt limit in 2011, he said on CNN that a default represented no large risk because debt-holders still would be paid, an assertion that the fact-checking website PolitiFact found to be false. When Democrats sought to extend unemployment benefits in 2010, Price cited economists who warned of a “moral hazard” in doing so. Price was also a leading organizer of the House Republicans’ protest in the House chamber during the August 2008 recess, which was aimed at pressuring then-Democratic Speaker Nancy Pelosi to bring to the floor a bill allowing offshore oil exploration in America’s coastal waters. His enthusiasm for playing political hardball impressed his GOP colleagues, as did his energy for the fight—he told The Atlanta Journal-Constitution he gets to his office before 7:30 a.m. and leaves at 10:30 or 11 p.m.

Price hoped to parlay his hard work into a higher leadership post, and in late 2012, he sought the chairmanship of the Republican Conference, the No. 4-ranking job. Although he had the backing of Ryan, the GOP’s 2012 vice presidential nominee, Boehner favored Washington state’s Cathy McMorris Rodgers, the conference vice chair. Boehner reportedly offered Price a ceremonial leadership posting to drop out and publicly pledge his loyalty to Boehner, but Price declined the offer and lost to McMorris Rodgers in a closed-door vote.

Price has been reelected with only minor opposition and ran unopposed in 2010. He did get some negative attention in 2010, when it was revealed he was among eight lawmakers under investigation by the Office of Congressional Ethics for holding fundraisers or receiving donations from businesses shortly before voting on a Wall Street regulation bill. The House Ethics Committee subsequently dropped the charges.

Journal-Constitution columnist Jim Galloway described Price in January 2013 as "undoubtedly the most ambitious member of the Georgia delegation." News reports at the time indicated Price was mulling a primary challenge to Georgia Sen. Saxby Chambliss, who drew fire from conservatives for his willingness to work with Democrats. But Price ultimately decided against running. He was unlikely not get much help from Georgia’s Republican establishment: He originally backed fellow Rep. Nathan Deal for governor in 2010, then switched his allegiance to ex-Georgia Secretary of State Karen Handel while the rest of the state’s delegation stuck with Deal. After Deal won the election, Price reportedly was all but shut out of a role in the redistricting process.

Instead, Ryan named Price as the Budget Committee's vice chairman. He was one of the key House critics of the Obama administration's implementation of the Affordable Care Act, and sponsored a bill barring the Internal Revenue Service from enforcing or implementing the law. It passed the House but went nowhere in the Democratic-controlled Senate. Another bill he sponsored that passed the House on a largely party-line vote in April 2014 would require the Congressional Budget Office to assess the broad economic impacts of major legislation beyond their simple monetary cost.

In the aftermath of House Majority Leader Eric Cantor's stunning June primary defeat, Price mulled another run for leadership but instead said he would focus on succeeding Ryan -- who is term-limited -- as Budget chairman.

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Tom Price Election Results
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2012 General
Tom Price (R)
Votes: 189,669
Percent: 64.51%
Jeff Kazanow (D)
Votes: 104,365
Percent: 35.49%
2012 Primary
Tom Price (R)
Votes: 71,032
Percent: 100.0%
Prior Winning Percentages
2010 (unopposed), 2008 (68%), 2006 (72%), 2004 (100%)
Tom Price Votes and Bills
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National Journal’s rating system is an objective method of analyzing voting. The liberal score means that the lawmaker’s votes were more liberal than that percentage of his colleagues’ votes. The conservative score means his votes were more conservative than that percentage of his colleagues’ votes. The composite score is an average of a lawmaker’s six issue-based scores. See all NJ Voting

More Liberal
More Conservative
2013 2012 2011
Economic 5 (L) : 94 (C) 11 (L) : 87 (C) - (L) : 90 (C)
Social - (L) : 87 (C) - (L) : 91 (C) - (L) : 83 (C)
Foreign 24 (L) : 68 (C) 30 (L) : 66 (C) - (L) : 91 (C)
Composite 13.3 (L) : 86.7 (C) 16.2 (L) : 83.8 (C) 6.0 (L) : 94.0 (C)
Interest Group Ratings

The vote ratings by 10 special interest groups provide insight into a lawmaker’s general ideology and the degree to which he or she agrees with the group’s point of view. Two organizations provide just one combined rating for 2011 and 2012, the two sessions of the 112th Congress. They are the ACLU and the ITIC. About the interest groups.

20112012
FRC9083
LCV96
CFG8686
ITIC-83
NTU8384
20112012
COC100-
ACLU-0
ACU92100
ADA010
AFSCME0-
Key House Votes

The key votes show how a member of Congress voted on the major bills of the year. N indicates a "no" vote; Y a "yes" vote. If a member voted "present" or was absent, the bill caption is not shown. For a complete description of the bills included in key votes, see the Almanac's Guide to Usage.

    • Pass GOP budget
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • End fiscal cliff
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • Extend payroll tax cut
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Find AG in contempt
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Stop student loan hike
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • Repeal health care
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Raise debt limit
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Pass cut, cap, balance
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Defund Planned Parenthood
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Repeal lightbulb ban
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Add endangered listings
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Speed troop withdrawal
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Regulate financial firms
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2010
    • Pass tax cuts for some
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2010
    • Stop detainee transfers
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2010
    • Legalize immigrants' kids
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2010
    • Repeal don't ask, tell
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2010
    • Limit campaign funds
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2010
    • Overturn Ledbetter
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Pass $820 billion stimulus
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Let guns in national parks
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Pass cap-and-trade
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Bar federal abortion funds
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Pass health care bill
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Bail out financial markets
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2008
    • Repeal D.C. gun law
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2008
    • Overhaul FISA
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2008
    • Increase minimum wage
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • Expand SCHIP
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • Raise CAFE standards
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • Share immigration data
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
    • Foreign aid abortion ban
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
    • Ban gay bias in workplace
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • Withdraw troops 8/08
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • No operations in Iran
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • Free trade with Peru
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
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The Almanac is a members-only database of searchable profiles compiled and adapted from the Almanac of American Politics. Comprehensive online profiles include biographical and political summaries of elected officials, campaign expenditures, voting records, interest-group ratings, and congressional staff look-ups. In-depth overviews of each state and house district are included as well, along with demographic data, analysis of voting trends, and political histories.
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