Skip Navigation

Close and don't show again.

Your browser is out of date.

You may not get the full experience here on National Journal.

Please upgrade your browser to any of the following supported browsers:

Jared Polis Jared Polis

NEXT :
This ad will end in seconds
 
Close X

Want access to this content? Learn More »

Forget Your Password?

Don't have an account? Register »

Reveal Navigation
 

 

Almanac

Search

Enter your search query or use our Advanced People Search. Need Help? View our search tips

View Saved Lists
View Saved Lists
Democrat

Rep. Jared Polis (D)

Jared Polis Contact
Back to top
Email: n/a
DC Contact Information

Phone: 202-225-2161

Address: 1433 LHOB, DC 20515

Websites: polis.house.gov
State Office Contact Information

Phone: (303) 484-9596

Address: 1644 Walnut Street, Boulder CO 80302

Frisco CO

Phone: (970) 409-7301

Address: PO Box 1453, Frisco CO 80443-1453

Fort Collins CO

Phone: (970) 226-1239

Address: 1220 South College Avenue, Fort Collins CO 80525

Jared Polis Staff
Back to top
Sort by INTEREST NAME TITLE
Frucht, Craig
Legislative Assistant
Morris, Bo
Legislative Assistant
Frucht, Craig
Legislative Assistant
Berman, Mike
Legislative Director
Morris, Bo
Legislative Assistant
Berman, Mike
Legislative Director
Berman, Mike
Legislative Director
Frucht, Craig
Legislative Assistant
Morris, Bo
Legislative Assistant
Berman, Mike
Legislative Director
Frucht, Craig
Legislative Assistant
Henry, Danielle
Constituent Advocate
Berman, Mike
Legislative Director
Berman, Mike
Legislative Director
Frucht, Craig
Legislative Assistant
Berman, Mike
Legislative Director
Feinhor, Stuart
Constituent Advocate
Berman, Mike
Legislative Director
Berman, Mike
Legislative Director
Grim, Jamie
District Representative
Morris, Bo
Legislative Assistant
Frucht, Craig
Legislative Assistant
Frucht, Craig
Legislative Assistant
Berman, Mike
Legislative Director
Frucht, Craig
Legislative Assistant
Berman, Mike
Legislative Director
Morris, Bo
Legislative Assistant
Berman, Mike
Legislative Director
Morris, Bo
Legislative Assistant
Berman, Mike
Legislative Director
Frucht, Craig
Legislative Assistant
Frucht, Craig
Legislative Assistant
Henry, Danielle
Constituent Advocate
Loweree, Jorge
Senior Counsel
Morris, Bo
Legislative Assistant
Frucht, Craig
Legislative Assistant
Henry, Danielle
Constituent Advocate
Loweree, Jorge
Senior Counsel
Morris, Bo
Legislative Assistant
Brosy-Wiwchar, Mara
District Representative
Frucht, Craig
Legislative Assistant
Frucht, Craig
Legislative Assistant
Morris, Bo
Legislative Assistant
Berman, Mike
Legislative Director
Henry, Danielle
Constituent Advocate
Berman, Mike
Legislative Director
Frucht, Craig
Legislative Assistant
Morris, Bo
Legislative Assistant
Berman, Mike
Legislative Director
Loweree, Jorge
Senior Counsel
Berman, Mike
Legislative Director
Erickson, Nissa
District Representative
Berman, Mike
Legislative Director
Frucht, Craig
Legislative Assistant
Berman, Mike
Legislative Director
Brosy-Wiwchar, Mara
District Representative
Henry, Danielle
Constituent Advocate
Morris, Bo
Legislative Assistant
Berman, Mike
Legislative Director
Henry, Danielle
Constituent Advocate
Morris, Bo
Legislative Assistant
Berman, Mike
Legislative Director
Frucht, Craig
Legislative Assistant
Erickson, Nissa
District Representative
Feinhor, Stuart
Constituent Advocate
Frucht, Craig
Legislative Assistant
Feinhor, Stuart
Constituent Advocate
Frucht, Craig
Legislative Assistant
Frucht, Craig
Legislative Assistant
Morris, Bo
Legislative Assistant
Berman, Mike
Legislative Director
Feinhor, Stuart
Constituent Advocate
Berman, Mike
Legislative Director
Frucht, Craig
Legislative Assistant
Berman, Mike
Legislative Director
Morris, Bo
Legislative Assistant
Henry, Danielle
Constituent Advocate
Morris, Bo
Legislative Assistant
Berman, Mike
Legislative Director
Berman, Mike
Legislative Director
Berman, Mike
Legislative Director
Henry, Danielle
Constituent Advocate
Grim, Jamie
District Representative
Morris, Bo
Legislative Assistant
Frucht, Craig
Legislative Assistant
Frucht, Craig
Legislative Assistant
Morris, Bo
Legislative Assistant
Berman, Mike
Legislative Director
Feinhor, Stuart
Constituent Advocate
Frucht, Craig
Legislative Assistant
Erickson, Nissa
District Representative
Berman, Mike
Legislative Director
Henry, Danielle
Constituent Advocate
Frucht, Craig
Legislative Assistant
Lieberman, Eve
Chief of Staff
Berman, Mike
Legislative Director
Berman, Mike
Legislative Director
Berman, Mike
Legislative Director
Feinhor, Stuart
Constituent Advocate
Frucht, Craig
Legislative Assistant
Morris, Bo
Legislative Assistant
Morris, Bo
Legislative Assistant
Berman, Mike
Legislative Director
Brosy-Wiwchar, Mara
District Representative
Erickson, Nissa
District Representative
Feinhor, Stuart
Constituent Advocate
Frucht, Craig
Legislative Assistant
Grim, Jamie
District Representative
Henry, Danielle
Constituent Advocate
Kaufmann, Lisa
Colorado Chief of Staff
Lieberman, Eve
Chief of Staff
Loweree, Jorge
Senior Counsel
Lynch, Kristin
Colorado Communications Director
Morris, Bo
Legislative Assistant
Overland, Scott
Communications Director
Vogt, Camilla
Staff Assistant
Feinhor, Stuart
Constituent Advocate
Henry, Danielle
Constituent Advocate
Kaufmann, Lisa
Colorado Chief of Staff
Lieberman, Eve
Chief of Staff
Lynch, Kristin
Colorado Communications Director
Overland, Scott
Communications Director
Loweree, Jorge
Senior Counsel
Frucht, Craig
Legislative Assistant
Morris, Bo
Legislative Assistant
Berman, Mike
Legislative Director
Brosy-Wiwchar, Mara
District Representative
Erickson, Nissa
District Representative
Grim, Jamie
District Representative
Vogt, Camilla
Staff Assistant
Note: You can only itemize lists in the Interests and Title sections
Save List
X

Your saved lists will appear under My Saved Lists on The Almanac's landing page.

Jared Polis Committees
Back to top
Jared Polis Biography
Back to top
  • Elected: 2008, 3rd term.
  • District: Colorado 2
  • Born: May. 12, 1975, Boulder
  • Home: Boulder
  • Education:

    Princeton U., B.A. 1996.

  • Professional Career:

    Entrepreneur, 1996-2008.

  • Political Career:

    CO Bd. of Education, 2001-07, Chmn., 2004, Vice chmn., 2005-06.

  • Ethnicity: White/Caucasian
  • Religion:

    Jewish

  • Family: Partner (Marlon Reis); 1 children

Jared Polis, a Democrat first elected in 2008, is the first openly gay man elected to Congress, and he takes an avid interest in the cause of gay and lesbian rights. But the multimillionaire entrepreneur also focuses on health care, education, and technology, and he is becoming an important fundraiser for his party. Read More

Jared Polis, a Democrat first elected in 2008, is the first openly gay man elected to Congress, and he takes an avid interest in the cause of gay and lesbian rights. But the multimillionaire entrepreneur also focuses on health care, education, and technology, and he is becoming an important fundraiser for his party.

Polis was born in Boulder, but grew up in San Diego, returning to Colorado with his family during the summers. His mother, a poet, and his father, an artist, were both politically active during the anti-war movement of the late 1960s and early 1970s. Polis and his younger brother and sister frequently accompanied their parents to demonstrations and rallies. Their activism spurred Polis’ interest in politics and liberal ideas. He graduated from high school in three years, and headed off to Princeton University to study political science. Also fascinated by technology and business, Polis and two friends banded together in their sophomore year to launch a start-up called American Information Systems, an Internet access provider. Soon afterward, he founded bluemountainarts.com, an electronic greeting card site that at its height was the eighth most popular site on the Internet. His next venture was Proflowers.com, a service enabling customers to order fresh flowers directly from growers. All three were successful, and Polis sold them for profits of upwards of $300 million. (He still distributes business cards in which he calls himself a “retired florist.”)

Financial security from his business ventures allowed Polis to focus on his other passions. “I was always interested in public service. Education is an issue I feel very passionately about, providing an opportunity to all Americans,” he said. In 2000, he was elected to the ColoradoState Board of Education, serving for six years and as chairman for one year. During his tenure, Polis says he was most proud of his advancement of school choice through the establishment of charter schools and his work improving accountability standards for schools. In part with his own money, he founded two innovative charter schools in Colorado, which were geared toward helping new immigrants assimilate. One of the schools, the New America School, targeted 16-to- 21-year-old immigrants with flexible day or evening programs, day-care reimbursement and teachers trained to help students learn English. “We really needed a school to cater to their unique needs,” Polis said. At the same time, he partnered with three other Colorado multimillionaires—who were dubbed the “Gang of Four” in newspapers—and built a massive political fundraising operation that raised $3.6 million in 2004.

When Democratic Rep. Mark Udall in Colorado’s 2nd District decided to run for an open Senate seat in 2008, Polis ran for Udall’s House seat. In the Democratic primary, he faced former state Senate President Joan Fitz-Gerald and conservationist Will Shafroth. Most of the state’s Democratic establishment backed Fitz-Gerald, based on her political seasoning. Pouring his own money into the campaign, Polis outspent his opponents 4-to-1. In the August 2008 primary, he got 42% of the vote, followed by Fitz-Gerald with 38% and Shafroth with 20%. In the general election, Republican nominee Scott Starin, an engineer, raised less than $100,000 and provided little serious opposition. Polis won 63% to 34%. All in all, he spent $7 million, $6 million of it his own. The nonpartisan watchdog Center for Responsive Politics ranked Polis in 2011 as the third-wealthiest member of the House, pegging his wealth in the range of $215 million, based on his financial disclosure reports.

In Washington, Democratic leaders gave Polis a seat on the influential Rules Committee, which controls the terms of debate for major bills that reach the floor of the House. He introduced a bill in May 2012 to prevent pizza from being counted as a vegetable in school lunches after a similar Department of Agriculture proposal met with resistance from the frozen food industry. Two years earlier, he sponsored a bill offering non-dairy alternatives to milk as part of those lunches. He is also apt to get involved in budget issues. He was one of just 22 Democrats to vote in April 2012 for a bill based on the recommendations of President Barack Obama’s Simpson-Bowles deficit-reduction commission. And he and Colorado Republican Mike Coffman got the House in May 2012 to pass their idea to remove the Army’s four permanent brigade combat teams from Western Europe as a cost-saving measure.

In 2009, Polis jumped into the health care debate, taking a leading role in fighting a proposal by his own party that would pay for elements of the overhauled system with a tax on wealthy Americans. Polis maintained that the tax would hurt small business owners who aren’t large enough to organize as corporations. He was chided by liberal bloggers, but he succeeded in corralling 21 other freshman Democrats to sign a letter to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi calling on her to purge the surtax from the bill, and it was not included as part of the sweeping overhaul of health care that passed the House in 2009.

On gay rights issues, Polis is a co-sponsor of a proposed repeal of the Defense of Marriage Act, the 1996 law that permits states to refuse to recognize gay marriages. Obama has said he will sign the repeal if it passes, and by the end of 2012, it had attracted more than 150 co-sponsors. Polis was among the Democrats who unsuccessfully sought to amend the House-passed Violence Against Women Act in May 2012 to expand protections for gay people.

Using social media has also been a central element of Polis’ time in office. By the end of 2012 he had more than 1,200 subscribers on Facebook and more than 35,000 followers on Twitter. “It’s a very tech-savvy district, a very wired district,” he says. He and Republican Rep. Jason Chaffetz of Utah teamed up on a bill in September 2012 aimed at clarifying the confusing rules governing digital music broadcasting royalties.

Polis also has displayed an impressive fundraising ability, collecting from liberal interest groups and investment companies while donating money to politically vulnerable Democrats through his Jared Polis Victory Fund. In 2010, he made it onto Time magazine’s “40 Under 40” list of young movers and shakers. He had little trouble winning reelection in 2010, dispatching tea party-backed Republican Stephen Bailey with 57%. In redistricting two years later, Polis picked up all of Larimer County, which had traditionally been a swing area. But he won anyway, taking 56% over state Sen. Kevin Lundberg. He donated more money to his own campaign—nearly $385,000—than Lundberg raised overall.

Show Less
Jared Polis Election Results
Back to top
2012 General
Jared Polis (D)
Votes: 234,758
Percent: 55.69%
Kevin Lundberg (R)
Votes: 162,639
Percent: 38.58%
Randy Luallin (Lib)
Votes: 13,770
Percent: 3.27%
Susan Hall (Green)
Votes: 10,413
Percent: 2.47%
2012 Primary
Jared Polis (D)
Votes: 36,097
Percent: 100.0%
Prior Winning Percentages
2010 (57%), 2008 (63%)
Jared Polis Votes and Bills
Back to top NJ Vote Ratings

National Journal’s rating system is an objective method of analyzing voting. The liberal score means that the lawmaker’s votes were more liberal than that percentage of his colleagues’ votes. The conservative score means his votes were more conservative than that percentage of his colleagues’ votes. The composite score is an average of a lawmaker’s six issue-based scores. See all NJ Voting

More Liberal
More Conservative
2013 2012 2011
Economic 61 (L) : 38 (C) 69 (L) : 31 (C) 78 (L) : 22 (C)
Social 66 (L) : 32 (C) 65 (L) : 34 (C) 76 (L) : 24 (C)
Foreign 78 (L) : 21 (C) 70 (L) : 30 (C) 76 (L) : 23 (C)
Composite 69.0 (L) : 31.0 (C) 68.2 (L) : 31.8 (C) 76.8 (L) : 23.2 (C)
Interest Group Ratings

The vote ratings by 10 special interest groups provide insight into a lawmaker’s general ideology and the degree to which he or she agrees with the group’s point of view. Two organizations provide just one combined rating for 2011 and 2012, the two sessions of the 112th Congress. They are the ACLU and the ITIC. About the interest groups.

20112012
FRC00
LCV83100
CFG2027
ITIC-82
NTU2523
20112012
COC23-
ACLU-84
ACU94
ADA8585
AFSCME100-
Key House Votes

The key votes show how a member of Congress voted on the major bills of the year. N indicates a "no" vote; Y a "yes" vote. If a member voted "present" or was absent, the bill caption is not shown. For a complete description of the bills included in key votes, see the Almanac's Guide to Usage.

    • Pass GOP budget
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • End fiscal cliff
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Extend payroll tax cut
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Stop student loan hike
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • Repeal health care
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • Raise debt limit
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Pass cut, cap, balance
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Defund Planned Parenthood
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Repeal lightbulb ban
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Add endangered listings
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Speed troop withdrawal
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Regulate financial firms
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2010
    • Pass tax cuts for some
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2010
    • Stop detainee transfers
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2010
    • Legalize immigrants' kids
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2010
    • Repeal don't ask, tell
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2010
    • Limit campaign funds
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2010
    • Overturn Ledbetter
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Pass $820 billion stimulus
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Let guns in national parks
    • Vote:
    • Year: 2009
    • Pass cap-and-trade
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Bar federal abortion funds
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Pass health care bill
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
Read More
 
Browse The Almanac
Congressional Leadership
and Committees

House Committees
Senate Committees
Joint Committees
Leadership Roster
About Almanac
almanac cover
The Almanac is a members-only database of searchable profiles compiled and adapted from the Almanac of American Politics. Comprehensive online profiles include biographical and political summaries of elected officials, campaign expenditures, voting records, interest-group ratings, and congressional staff look-ups. In-depth overviews of each state and house district are included as well, along with demographic data, analysis of voting trends, and political histories.
Members: Buy the book at 25% off retail.
Order Now
Need Help?

Contact Us:

202.266.7900 | membership@nationaljournal.com