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Democrat

Rep. Tim Bishop (D)

Tim Bishop Contact
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Email: n/a
DC Contact Information

Phone: 202-225-3826

Address: 306 CHOB, DC 20515

Tim Bishop Committees
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Tim Bishop Biography
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  • Elected: 2002, 6th term.
  • District: New York 1
  • Born: Jun. 01, 1950, Southampton
  • Home: Southampton
  • Education:

    Holy Cross Col., A.B. 1972; Long Island U., M.P.A. 1981

  • Professional Career:

    Admin., Southampton College, 1973-2002.

  • Religion:

    Catholic

  • Family: Married (Kathryn); 2 children

Democrat Tim Bishop, first elected in 2002, is a former college administrator who often works on education-related issues. He is more of a centrist than other New York City-area Democrats and, after enduring several bruising reelection contests, seeks to avoid being viewed as avidly partisan. Read More

Democrat Tim Bishop, first elected in 2002, is a former college administrator who often works on education-related issues. He is more of a centrist than other New York City-area Democrats and, after enduring several bruising reelection contests, seeks to avoid being viewed as avidly partisan.

He grew up in Southampton, the son of a telephone lineman with “an overpowering work ethic,” he told Newsday after his father’s death in July 2012. He graduated from Holy Cross College and Long Island University. He spent his entire professional career at Southampton College, where he began in 1973 as an admissions counselor and by 1986 had become provost. He chaired the town of Southampton’s Board of Ethics and was on the board of the Eastern Long Island Coastal Conservation Alliance.

Few paid much attention when Bishop announced he would oppose Rep. Felix Grucci, the first-term Republican who had won the seat in 2000 from Mike Forbes, who alienated voters by switching from the Republican Party to become a Democrat. The turn of events allowed Grucci to easily win the general election, 56%-41%, and Grucci seemed headed for an easy reelection in 2002. But then, in late September, Grucci ran an ad accusing Bishop of falsifying rape statistics at Southampton and “turning his back on rape victims.” The allegations, based on inaccurate college newspaper stories, were false. Grucci’s campaign refused to repudiate the ad, on the ground that no correction had ever appeared in print. National Democrats saw an opportunity to pick up a seat, and soon the airwaves were saturated with ads attacking Grucci both for the rape commercial and in one spot linking the Grucci family’s famed fireworks enterprise to chemical contamination of local drinking water. Bishop won 50%-49%.

In the House, Bishop compiled a voting record near the center of House Democrats. He has been close to labor unions and introduced a bill in December 2011 to prohibit companies that outsource call center jobs overseas from receiving federal grants and loans. It drew more than 130 cosponsors but did not advance. He unsuccessfully tried in February 2012 to amend a Republican energy bill to bar oil and gas exploration off the coasts of Northeastern states.

His initial vote for President Barack Obama’s health care initiative in 2009 enraged some constituents and led him to cancel town hall meetings; after one particularly emotional session, he needed a police escort to his car. He still backed the final bill, but signed on in January 2013 as one of a handful of Democratic cosponsors to a GOP bill to repeal the Independent Payment Advisory Board, a cost-cutting measure included in the law. He said the panel usurped Congress’ role in setting Medicare payments for health providers.

With his extensive background in academia, Bishop played a leading role on the Education and Labor Committee in the 2008 higher education bill that enacted spending increases for colleges and universities. He introduced a bill in July 2011 to create a “master corps” of teachers in the science, technology, math, and engineering fields that would receive extra money and other perks. And he has repeatedly advocated for a greater federal investment in higher education to keep the United States competitive globally. “It’s going to be awful hard for us if we are not building the talent base that we need, and a huge piece of the ability to build a talent base is access to higher education. And a huge piece … is affordability,” he said October 2011. Another area in which he has sought more funding is sewers. He introduced a measure in 2011 calling for investing $13.8 billion over five years in wastewater infrastructure upgrades and establishing a clean water trust fund to provide long-term financing.

On local issues, Bishop successfully fought proposed cutbacks at Brookhaven and sought funds for improving Long Island Sound’s water quality. Like other members of Congress representing vacation spots, he has sought to increase seasonal worker visas. Mindful of the district’s competitive nature, Bishop has also paid close attention to constituent services.

Republicans have made Bishop a prime target in the past but have not succeeded in dislodging him. In 2004, their nominee was Bill Manger, a Southampton village trustee who emphasized his independence from national Republicans and attacked Bishop for opposing tax cuts. But Bishop won handily, 56%-44%. After that, he barely broke a sweat againstopponents who were too conservative for the area.

But his 2010 race was among the year’s most suspenseful. GOP nominee Randy Altschuler, a wealthy businessman, ran as a fiscal conservative. Bishop accused him of outsourcing jobs overseas and led in the polls, but Altschuler had the funding to compete, spending $4.6 million to Bishop’s $3.1 million. On Election Night, Bishop led the race by about 3,500 votes out of more than 180,000 cast. But underreporting and other serious election mistakes shrank his lead to 383 votes. A recount dragged on; a month after the election, Bishop maintained a small lead and Altschuler finally conceded.

Altschuler returned for a rematch in 2012 and took even sharper aim at what he said were Bishop’s ethical shortcomings. In particular, the Republican sought to capitalize on a flap over Bishop’s role in securing a permit for a campaign donor to feature a large fireworks display at his son’s bar mitzvah. His allies also dinged Bishop for paying his daughter hundreds of thousands of dollars in campaign consulting fees, but the congressman responded that those dealings were fair and legal. The aftermath of Hurricane Sandy kept Republican turnout down, and Bishop got a lift from Obama’s strong showing in New York to win with 52% of the vote.

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Tim Bishop Election Results
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2012 General
Timothy Bishop (D)
Votes: 146,179
Percent: 52.45%
Randy Altschuler
Votes: 132,304
Percent: 47.55%
2012 Primary
Timothy Bishop (D)
Unopposed
Prior Winning Percentages
2010 (50%), 2008 (58%), 2006 (62%), 2004 (56%), 2002 (50%)
Tim Bishop Votes and Bills
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National Journal’s rating system is an objective method of analyzing voting. The liberal score means that the lawmaker’s votes were more liberal than that percentage of his colleagues’ votes. The conservative score means his votes were more conservative than that percentage of his colleagues’ votes. The composite score is an average of a lawmaker’s six issue-based scores. See all NJ Voting

More Liberal
More Conservative
2013 2012 2011
Economic 73 (L) : 27 (C) 62 (L) : 38 (C) 76 (L) : 23 (C)
Social 66 (L) : 32 (C) 71 (L) : 28 (C) 73 (L) : 25 (C)
Foreign 81 (L) : 18 (C) 73 (L) : 27 (C) 72 (L) : 27 (C)
Composite 73.8 (L) : 26.2 (C) 68.8 (L) : 31.2 (C) 74.3 (L) : 25.7 (C)
Interest Group Ratings

The vote ratings by 10 special interest groups provide insight into a lawmaker’s general ideology and the degree to which he or she agrees with the group’s point of view. Two organizations provide just one combined rating for 2011 and 2012, the two sessions of the 112th Congress. They are the ACLU and the ITIC. About the interest groups.

20112012
FRC00
LCV10080
CFG020
ITIC-67
NTU1319
20112012
COC31-
ACLU-76
ACU08
ADA8560
AFSCME100-
Key House Votes

The key votes show how a member of Congress voted on the major bills of the year. N indicates a "no" vote; Y a "yes" vote. If a member voted "present" or was absent, the bill caption is not shown. For a complete description of the bills included in key votes, see the Almanac's Guide to Usage.

    • Pass GOP budget
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • End fiscal cliff
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Extend payroll tax cut
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Find AG in contempt
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • Stop student loan hike
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Repeal health care
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • Raise debt limit
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Pass cut, cap, balance
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Defund Planned Parenthood
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Repeal lightbulb ban
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Add endangered listings
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Speed troop withdrawal
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Regulate financial firms
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2010
    • Pass tax cuts for some
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2010
    • Stop detainee transfers
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2010
    • Legalize immigrants' kids
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2010
    • Repeal don't ask, tell
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2010
    • Limit campaign funds
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2010
    • Overturn Ledbetter
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Pass $820 billion stimulus
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Let guns in national parks
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Pass cap-and-trade
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Bar federal abortion funds
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Pass health care bill
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Bail out financial markets
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2008
    • Repeal D.C. gun law
    • Vote:
    • Year: 2008
    • Overhaul FISA
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2008
    • Increase minimum wage
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
    • Expand SCHIP
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
    • Raise CAFE standards
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
    • Share immigration data
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • Foreign aid abortion ban
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • Ban gay bias in workplace
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
    • Withdraw troops 8/08
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
    • No operations in Iran
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
    • Free trade with Peru
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
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The Almanac is a members-only database of searchable profiles compiled and adapted from the Almanac of American Politics. Comprehensive online profiles include biographical and political summaries of elected officials, campaign expenditures, voting records, interest-group ratings, and congressional staff look-ups. In-depth overviews of each state and house district are included as well, along with demographic data, analysis of voting trends, and political histories.
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