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Republican

Rep. Pete Olson (R)

Pete Olson Contact
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Email: n/a
DC Contact Information

Phone: 202-225-5951

Address: 312 CHOB, DC 20515

Websites: olson.house.gov
State Office Contact Information

Phone: (281) 494-2690

Address: 1650 Highway Six, Sugar Land TX 77478-4921

Pearland TX

Phone: (281) 485-4855

Fax: (281) 485-4850

Address: 6302 West Broadway Street, Pearland TX 77581-7857

Katy TX

Phone: (281) 889-7134

Address: 22333 Grand Corner Drive, Katy TX 77494

Pete Olson Staff
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Anderson, Matthew
Legislative Assistant
Moxley, Sarah
Legislative Director
Anderson, Matthew
Legislative Assistant
Moxley, Sarah
Legislative Director
Anderson, Matthew
Legislative Assistant
Moxley, Sarah
Legislative Director
Moxley, Sarah
Legislative Director
Moxley, Sarah
Legislative Director
Moxley, Sarah
Legislative Director
Anderson, Matthew
Legislative Assistant
Moxley, Sarah
Legislative Director
Moxley, Sarah
Legislative Director
Anderson, Matthew
Legislative Assistant
Moxley, Sarah
Legislative Director
Moxley, Sarah
Legislative Director
Anderson, Matthew
Legislative Assistant
Anderson, Matthew
Legislative Assistant
Anderson, Matthew
Legislative Assistant
Moxley, Sarah
Legislative Director
Anderson, Matthew
Legislative Assistant
Moxley, Sarah
Legislative Director
England, Richard
Energy Policy Advisor
England, Richard
Energy Policy Advisor
Anderson, Matthew
Legislative Assistant
England, Richard
Energy Policy Advisor
Moxley, Sarah
Legislative Director
Moxley, Sarah
Legislative Director
Anderson, Matthew
Legislative Assistant
England, Richard
Energy Policy Advisor
Moxley, Sarah
Legislative Director
Anderson, Matthew
Legislative Assistant
Moxley, Sarah
Legislative Director
England, Richard
Energy Policy Advisor
Moxley, Sarah
Legislative Director
England, Richard
Energy Policy Advisor
Moxley, Sarah
Legislative Director
Anderson, Matthew
Legislative Assistant
Moxley, Sarah
Legislative Director
Anderson, Matthew
Legislative Assistant
England, Richard
Energy Policy Advisor
Moxley, Sarah
Legislative Director
Anderson, Matthew
Legislative Assistant
Moxley, Sarah
Legislative Director
Anderson, Matthew
Legislative Assistant
England, Richard
Energy Policy Advisor
Moxley, Sarah
Legislative Director
Moxley, Sarah
Legislative Director
Kelly, Melissa
Communications Director
Anderson, Matthew
Legislative Assistant
Moxley, Sarah
Legislative Director
Anderson, Matthew
Legislative Assistant
Anderson, Matthew
Legislative Assistant
Moxley, Sarah
Legislative Director
Anderson, Matthew
Legislative Assistant
Moxley, Sarah
Legislative Director
Moxley, Sarah
Legislative Director
Moxley, Sarah
Legislative Director
Anderson, Matthew
Legislative Assistant
England, Richard
Energy Policy Advisor
Anderson, Matthew
Legislative Assistant
Moxley, Sarah
Legislative Director
Moxley, Sarah
Legislative Director
Moxley, Sarah
Legislative Director
Anderson, Matthew
Legislative Assistant
England, Richard
Energy Policy Advisor
Moxley, Sarah
Legislative Director
Anderson, Matthew
Legislative Assistant
Moxley, Sarah
Legislative Director
Moxley, Sarah
Legislative Director
England, Richard
Energy Policy Advisor
Moxley, Sarah
Legislative Director
Kelly, Melissa
Communications Director
Moxley, Sarah
Legislative Director
Anderson, Matthew
Legislative Assistant
England, Richard
Energy Policy Advisor
Moxley, Sarah
Legislative Director
Moxley, Sarah
Legislative Director
Moxley, Sarah
Legislative Director
Anderson, Matthew
Legislative Assistant
Anderson, Matthew
Legislative Assistant
England, Richard
Energy Policy Advisor
Moxley, Sarah
Legislative Director
Anderson, Matthew
Legislative Assistant
England, Richard
Energy Policy Advisor
Anderson, Matthew
Legislative Assistant
Moxley, Sarah
Legislative Director
Anderson, Matthew
Legislative Assistant
Brooks, Adam
Special Assistant
Ellington, Victoria
District Scheduler; Staff Assistant
England, Richard
Energy Policy Advisor
Kelly, Melissa
Communications Director
Martin, Jack
Staff Assistant
Moxley, Sarah
Legislative Director
Nations, Kayla
Staff Assistant
Nelson, Tyler
Chief of Staff
Payne, Allie
Press Assistant
Quarles, Robert
District Director
Vackar, Katie
Casework Director
Vidic, Kial
Field Representative
England, Richard
Energy Policy Advisor
Nelson, Tyler
Chief of Staff
Kelly, Melissa
Communications Director
Quarles, Robert
District Director
Vackar, Katie
Casework Director
Anderson, Matthew
Legislative Assistant
Moxley, Sarah
Legislative Director
Payne, Allie
Press Assistant
Vidic, Kial
Field Representative
Ellington, Victoria
District Scheduler; Staff Assistant
Brooks, Adam
Special Assistant
Ellington, Victoria
District Scheduler; Staff Assistant
Martin, Jack
Staff Assistant
Nations, Kayla
Staff Assistant
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Pete Olson Committees
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Pete Olson Biography
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  • Elected: 2008, 3rd term.
  • District: Texas 22
  • Born: Dec. 09, 1962, Fort Lewis, WA
  • Home: Sugar Land
  • Education:

    Rice U., B.A. 1985; U of TX, J.D. 1988

  • Professional Career:

    Naval officer; Staffer, U.S. Sen. Phil Gramm.

  • Military Career:

    Navy, 1988-98, Naval Reserve, 1998-Present.

  • Ethnicity: White/Caucasian
  • Religion:

    Methodist

  • Family: Married (Nancy); 2 children

Pete Olson, a Republican elected in 2008, represents the district once overseen by Tom DeLay, the powerful former House majority leader. Olson is every bit as conservative as DeLay and just as vigilant in advocating on behalf of Texas’ oil and space interests. Read More

Pete Olson, a Republican elected in 2008, represents the district once overseen by Tom DeLay, the powerful former House majority leader. Olson is every bit as conservative as DeLay and just as vigilant in advocating on behalf of Texas’ oil and space interests.

The son of an Army veteran, Olson followed in his father’s footsteps and entered the Navy on the same day he took the Texas bar exam. He served as a naval aviator, flew anti-submarine missions, and finished his military career as a liaison to the U.S. Senate (the same job that Arizona Republican Sen. John McCain had before he entered politics). His next job was as a staff member for Republican Sen. Phil Gramm of Texas. After Gramm retired in 2002, Olson was the chief of staff to his successor, Republican Sen. John Cornyn.

In 2006, DeLay, at the pinnacle of power as majority leader, resigned his seat after being indicted in Texas. He eventually was convicted and sentenced in January 2011 to three years in prison for money laundering and conspiracy stemming from his role funneling corporate contributions to Texas state races. Houston City Council Member Shelley Sekula-Gibbs, a Republican, won a special election for the seat, served for several weeks, but then lost in the general election to Democrat Nick Lampson. A legal technicality kept her name off the ballot, and she had to run as a write-in candidate, which, with the lingering taint of the DeLay scandal, doomed her candidacy.

Two years later, Republicans targeted Lampson for defeat. Olson, who had been living in the suburbs of Washington, moved back to the district in 2007 and joined a crowded primary field that included Sekula-Gibbs and Sugar Land Mayor Dean Hrbacek. Sekula-Gibbs won the primary, but failed to get the 50% share of the vote needed to avoid a runoff with second-place Olson. Republicans at the state and national levels regarded Sekula-Gibbs as a weak candidate and coalesced around Olson, who won the runoff with 69% of the vote.

In the general election campaign, Olson touted a conservative message, while Lampson tried to tar Olson with DeLay’s image, charging that Olson employed consultants who had previously worked for DeLay. Democratic leaders also came to his aid, saying that if reelected, Lampson would chair the House subcommittee with jurisdiction over NASA, an important local employer. But in the end, all of this could not stop the district from returning to its GOP roots on Election Day. Olson won 52% to 45%.

In the House, Olson has been a rock-solid conservative. He led a congressional effort in February 2013 calling for the Government Accountability Office to release a study on the use of federal funding by Planned Parenthood and other health organizations that perform abortions. He got a plum seat on the Energy and Commerce Committee in 2011 and joined fellow Texas Republican Joe Barton on the panel as a staunch defender of their state’s oil and gas industry. The House passed his bill in August 2012 allowing power companies off the hook if they violate environmental laws while attempting to comply with federal mandates to maintain the reliability of their electricity grids during power emergencies. The Senate did not take it up. Olson was among lawmakers in February 2011 who accused the Interior Department of being too slow to approve new drilling permits and later was an outspoken advocate of the controversial Keystone XL pipeline, which is designed to carry Canadian oil to Texas refineries.

Olson has been a champion of NASA’s Johnson Space Center and called President Barack Obama’s flat budget request for the agency in fiscal 2012 “a non-starter” that ignored Congress’ interest in human space flight. He also has bemoaned what he calls Obama’s lack of interest in space policy. “Those who argue we do not have the resources or say government should not play a role in space exploration are short-sighted and wrong,” he wrote in a 2012 op-ed column in which he called for a return to the moon by 2020 to set the stage for an eventual manned mission to Mars. In March 2009, Olson collapsed while lifting weights in the House gym. He was taken to George Washington University Hospital, where he underwent emergency surgery to install a pacemaker. He fully recovered and had no trouble winning reelection in 2010 and 2012 against Democrat Kesha Rogers, a Lyndon LaRouche activist. He introduced a bill in 2011 to establish liability protections for businesses that acquire heart defibrillators for emergency use.

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Pete Olson Election Results
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2012 General
Pete Olson (R)
Votes: 160,668
Percent: 64.03%
Kesha Rogers
Votes: 80,203
Percent: 31.96%
Steven Susman
Votes: 5,986
Percent: 2.39%
2012 Primary
Pete Olson (R)
Votes: 35,838
Percent: 76.48%
Barbara Carlson (R)
Votes: 11,019
Percent: 23.52%
Prior Winning Percentages
2010 (67%), 2008 (52%)
Pete Olson Votes and Bills
Back to top NJ Vote Ratings

National Journal’s rating system is an objective method of analyzing voting. The liberal score means that the lawmaker’s votes were more liberal than that percentage of his colleagues’ votes. The conservative score means his votes were more conservative than that percentage of his colleagues’ votes. The composite score is an average of a lawmaker’s six issue-based scores. See all NJ Voting

More Liberal
More Conservative
2013 2012 2011
Economic 12 (L) : 88 (C) 7 (L) : 91 (C) 10 (L) : 83 (C)
Social - (L) : 87 (C) - (L) : 91 (C) - (L) : 83 (C)
Foreign 23 (L) : 77 (C) 9 (L) : 86 (C) 16 (L) : 75 (C)
Composite 13.8 (L) : 86.2 (C) 8.0 (L) : 92.0 (C) 14.2 (L) : 85.8 (C)
Interest Group Ratings

The vote ratings by 10 special interest groups provide insight into a lawmaker’s general ideology and the degree to which he or she agrees with the group’s point of view. Two organizations provide just one combined rating for 2011 and 2012, the two sessions of the 112th Congress. They are the ACLU and the ITIC. About the interest groups.

20112012
FRC90100
LCV93
CFG6283
ITIC-83
NTU7180
20112012
COC100-
ACLU-0
ACU84100
ADA00
AFSCME0-
Key House Votes

The key votes show how a member of Congress voted on the major bills of the year. N indicates a "no" vote; Y a "yes" vote. If a member voted "present" or was absent, the bill caption is not shown. For a complete description of the bills included in key votes, see the Almanac's Guide to Usage.

    • Pass GOP budget
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • End fiscal cliff
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • Extend payroll tax cut
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • Find AG in contempt
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Stop student loan hike
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Repeal health care
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Raise debt limit
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Pass cut, cap, balance
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Defund Planned Parenthood
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Repeal lightbulb ban
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Add endangered listings
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Speed troop withdrawal
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Regulate financial firms
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2010
    • Pass tax cuts for some
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2010
    • Stop detainee transfers
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2010
    • Legalize immigrants' kids
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2010
    • Repeal don't ask, tell
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2010
    • Limit campaign funds
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2010
    • Overturn Ledbetter
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Pass $820 billion stimulus
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Let guns in national parks
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Pass cap-and-trade
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Bar federal abortion funds
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Pass health care bill
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
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The Almanac is a members-only database of searchable profiles compiled and adapted from the Almanac of American Politics. Comprehensive online profiles include biographical and political summaries of elected officials, campaign expenditures, voting records, interest-group ratings, and congressional staff look-ups. In-depth overviews of each state and house district are included as well, along with demographic data, analysis of voting trends, and political histories.
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