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Republican

Rep. Rob Bishop (R)

Rob Bishop Contact
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Email: n/a
DC Contact Information

Phone: 202-225-0453

Address: 123 CHOB, DC 20515

State Office Contact Information

Phone: (801) 625-0107

Address: 324 - 25th Street, Ogden UT 84401-2361

Brigham City UT

Phone: (435) 734-2270

Fax: (435) 734-2290

Address: 6 North Main Street, Brigham City UT 84302-2116

Rob Bishop Staff
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Stewart, Adam
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Snider, Casey
Legislative Director; Policy Advisor
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Rob Bishop Committees
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Rob Bishop Biography
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  • Elected: 2002, 6th term.
  • District: Utah 1
  • Born: Jul. 13, 1951, Kaysville
  • Home: Brigham City
  • Education:

    U. of UT, B.A. 1974

  • Professional Career:

    H.S. teacher, 1974-2002; Chair, UT Rep. Party, 1997-2001.

  • Political Career:

    UT House, 1978-94; Speaker, 1993-94.

  • Ethnicity: White/Caucasian
  • Religion:

    Mormon

  • Family: Married (Jeralyn Hansen); 5 children

Rob Bishop, a Republican first elected in 2002, is a leading advocate of states’ rights and a sharp critic of the federal government’s management of public lands, both hot-button issues in the rural West. He is known for a sarcastic wit that he employs in blasting Democrats. Read More

Rob Bishop, a Republican first elected in 2002, is a leading advocate of states’ rights and a sharp critic of the federal government’s management of public lands, both hot-button issues in the rural West. He is known for a sarcastic wit that he employs in blasting Democrats.

Bishop grew up in Davis County and graduated from the University of Utah. He became a high school history and government teacher in Box Elder County. (He remains fond of giving guided historical tours of the Capitol; in one videotaped for The Salt Lake Tribune’swebsite, he pointed out religious-themed paintings displayed in the Rotunda and quipped, “So much for the separation of church and state.”) In 1978, at age 27, he was elected to the state House. In 1993 and 1994, he was House speaker. He continued working as a teacher after leaving the legislature, and also worked as a lobbyist for state Republicans and for the National Rifle Association.

When the U.S. seat became open, both Bishop and former House Majority Leader Kevin Garn ran. As a former state party chair for four years, Bishop won 58% of the vote at the Republican nominating convention. With mostly similar conservative views, their chief difference was a contentious issue in Utah: the ongoing battle between banks and credit unions. The credit union lobby endorsed Bishop who, as a lobbyist in 1999, helped defeat legislation to curtail the credit unions’ tax-exempt status. Bishop won the primary 60%-40%. Democrats believed they had a chance in the general election with nominee Dave Thomas, a wealthy advertising executive and an anti-abortion rights Mormon bishop who presented himself as a fiscal conservative and “a regular guy” not tied to special interests. Bishop won more easily than expected, 61%-37%.

In the House, Bishop has been a reliable conservative vote and has a seat on the GOP leadership-driven Rules Committee. He joined the Tea Party Caucus in 2010, and the previous year he unsuccessfully offered a GOP resolution on the House floor calling for an investigation into Democratic Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s claim that the Central Intelligence Agency misled her about the use of torture techniques on suspected terrorists. He started a “10th Amendment Task Force” to advocate for allowing states to assume control of federal programs, and introduced a proposed constitutional amendment in 2011 that would allow any federal law or regulation to be overturned if two-thirds of states opposed it. During his years in the Utah Legislature, “I learned to hate the federal government,” he told The Salt Lake Tribune in May 2010. “I could point to (highway) overpasses that were made because there was a 10-to-1 (funding) match, or programs we ran simply because the government bribed us with money.”

Bishop is chairman of the Public Lands and Environmental Regulation Subcommittee of the House Natural Resources Committee—a useful assignment in a state where the federal government controls nearly two-thirds of the land. It also puts him in the middle of environment and energy issues. He introduced a bill in 2011 to exempt border immigration enforcement activities from some environmental laws within 100 miles of U.S. borders, a move that critics called a thinly disguised attempt to bar any regulation of those lands. It passed the House in 2012 on a near party-line vote and advanced no further.

He long has been highly critical of attempts to designate new national monuments in the West, and in 2009 and 2011, introduced bills calling for oil drilling in Alaska’s Arctic National Wildlife Refuge and other areas. He told The Washington Post in 2012 that the Park Service, which was struggling to maintain its national parks, should stop acquiring land. “Why don’t we prioritize and realize the federal government cannot print money fast enough to do everything that needs to get done?” he asked. When President Barack Obama nominated Sally Jewell, the CEO of recreational retail chain REI, as his new Interior secretary in 2013, Bishop contended that REI “has intimately supported several special interest groups and subsequently helped to advance their radical political agendas.” Bishop’s spokeswoman pointed to the company’s support of the Southern Utah Wilderness Alliance and the Outdoor Industry Association.

Bishop has been comfortably reelected every two years. In 2012, his Democratic rival was Donna McAleer, an Army veteran and technology executive who blamed him for contributing to Congress’ gridlock. The Tribune called her the best-qualified candidate her party had fielded in years, but it endorsed Bishop, who won 72%-25%. He did shoulder some of the blame for Democrat Jim Matheson’s improbable reelection in the 4th District; the Tribune reported that during the post-2010 census redistricting process, some GOP strategists sought to put a few liberal areas of Salt Lake County in Bishop’s district to help shore up the party in the 2nd and 4th districts, but that Bishop refused.

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Rob Bishop Election Results
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2012 General
Rob Bishop (R)
Votes: 175,487
Percent: 71.47%
Donna McAleer (D)
Votes: 60,611
Percent: 24.69%
Sherry Phipps (CNP)
Votes: 9,430
Percent: 3.84%
2012 Primary
Rob Bishop (R)
Unopposed
Prior Winning Percentages
2010 (69%), 2008 (65%), 2006 (63%), 2004 (68%), 2002 (61%)
Rob Bishop Votes and Bills
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National Journal’s rating system is an objective method of analyzing voting. The liberal score means that the lawmaker’s votes were more liberal than that percentage of his colleagues’ votes. The conservative score means his votes were more conservative than that percentage of his colleagues’ votes. The composite score is an average of a lawmaker’s six issue-based scores. See all NJ Voting

More Liberal
More Conservative
2013 2012 2011
Economic 26 (L) : 74 (C) 2 (L) : 97 (C) - (L) : 90 (C)
Social 13 (L) : 84 (C) 20 (L) : 79 (C) 45 (L) : 55 (C)
Foreign - (L) : 95 (C) 43 (L) : 54 (C) 46 (L) : 53 (C)
Composite 14.3 (L) : 85.7 (C) 22.5 (L) : 77.5 (C) 32.2 (L) : 67.8 (C)
Interest Group Ratings

The vote ratings by 10 special interest groups provide insight into a lawmaker’s general ideology and the degree to which he or she agrees with the group’s point of view. Two organizations provide just one combined rating for 2011 and 2012, the two sessions of the 112th Congress. They are the ACLU and the ITIC. About the interest groups.

20112012
FRC90100
LCV69
CFG8681
ITIC-33
NTU8078
20112012
COC75-
ACLU-23
ACU9688
ADA205
AFSCME0-
Key House Votes

The key votes show how a member of Congress voted on the major bills of the year. N indicates a "no" vote; Y a "yes" vote. If a member voted "present" or was absent, the bill caption is not shown. For a complete description of the bills included in key votes, see the Almanac's Guide to Usage.

    • Pass GOP budget
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • End fiscal cliff
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • Extend payroll tax cut
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • Find AG in contempt
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Stop student loan hike
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Repeal health care
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Raise debt limit
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Pass cut, cap, balance
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Defund Planned Parenthood
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Add endangered listings
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Speed troop withdrawal
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Regulate financial firms
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2010
    • Pass tax cuts for some
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2010
    • Stop detainee transfers
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2010
    • Legalize immigrants' kids
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2010
    • Repeal don't ask, tell
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2010
    • Limit campaign funds
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2010
    • Overturn Ledbetter
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Pass $820 billion stimulus
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Let guns in national parks
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Pass cap-and-trade
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Bar federal abortion funds
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Pass health care bill
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Bail out financial markets
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2008
    • Repeal D.C. gun law
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2008
    • Overhaul FISA
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2008
    • Increase minimum wage
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • Expand SCHIP
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • Raise CAFE standards
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • Share immigration data
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
    • Foreign aid abortion ban
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
    • Ban gay bias in workplace
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • Withdraw troops 8/08
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • No operations in Iran
    • Vote:
    • Year: 2007
    • Free trade with Peru
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
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The Almanac is a members-only database of searchable profiles compiled and adapted from the Almanac of American Politics. Comprehensive online profiles include biographical and political summaries of elected officials, campaign expenditures, voting records, interest-group ratings, and congressional staff look-ups. In-depth overviews of each state and house district are included as well, along with demographic data, analysis of voting trends, and political histories.
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