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Democrat

Rep. Jerrold Nadler (D)

Jerrold Nadler Contact
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Email: n/a
DC Contact Information

Phone: 202-225-5635

Address: 2110 RHOB, DC 20515

State Office Contact Information

Phone: (212) 367-7350

Address: 201 Varick Street, New York NY 10014-7069

Brooklyn NY

Phone: (718) 373-3198

Fax: (718) 996-0039

Address: 6605 Fort Hamilton Parkway, Brooklyn NY 11219

Jerrold Nadler Staff
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Connolly, Melissa
Legislative Assistant
Connolly, Melissa
Legislative Assistant
Morton, Lisette
Legislative Director
Morton, Lisette
Legislative Director
Connolly, Melissa
Legislative Assistant
Morton, Lisette
Legislative Director
Connolly, Melissa
Legislative Assistant
Connolly, Melissa
Legislative Assistant
Connolly, Melissa
Legislative Assistant
Connolly, Melissa
Legislative Assistant
Connolly, Melissa
Legislative Assistant
Doty, John
Washington Director
Connolly, Melissa
Legislative Assistant
Doty, John
Washington Director
Doty, John
Washington Director
Morton, Lisette
Legislative Director
Doty, John
Washington Director
Doty, John
Washington Director
Morton, Lisette
Legislative Director
Morton, Lisette
Legislative Director
Morton, Lisette
Legislative Director
Connolly, Melissa
Legislative Assistant
Connolly, Melissa
Legislative Assistant
Morton, Lisette
Legislative Director
Connolly, Melissa
Legislative Assistant
Morton, Lisette
Legislative Director
Morton, Lisette
Legislative Director
Morton, Lisette
Legislative Director
Morton, Lisette
Legislative Director
Morton, Lisette
Legislative Director
Connolly, Melissa
Legislative Assistant
Connolly, Melissa
Legislative Assistant
Morton, Lisette
Legislative Director
Freeman, Ben
Legislative Assistant; Press Assistant
Connolly, Melissa
Legislative Assistant
Morton, Lisette
Legislative Director
Connolly, Melissa
Legislative Assistant
Morton, Lisette
Legislative Director
Connolly, Melissa
Legislative Assistant
Doty, John
Washington Director
Connolly, Melissa
Legislative Assistant
Morton, Lisette
Legislative Director
Connolly, Melissa
Legislative Assistant
Morton, Lisette
Legislative Director
Doty, John
Washington Director
Morton, Lisette
Legislative Director
Connolly, Melissa
Legislative Assistant
Doty, John
Washington Director
Freeman, Ben
Legislative Assistant; Press Assistant
Connolly, Melissa
Legislative Assistant
Morton, Lisette
Legislative Director
Doty, John
Washington Director
Morton, Lisette
Legislative Director
Morton, Lisette
Legislative Director
Morton, Lisette
Legislative Director
Doty, John
Washington Director
Morton, Lisette
Legislative Director
Doty, John
Washington Director
Morton, Lisette
Legislative Director
Connolly, Melissa
Legislative Assistant
Connolly, Melissa
Legislative Assistant
Connolly, Melissa
Legislative Assistant
Doty, John
Washington Director
Doty, John
Washington Director
Morton, Lisette
Legislative Director
Morton, Lisette
Legislative Director
Morton, Lisette
Legislative Director
Morton, Lisette
Legislative Director
Connolly, Melissa
Legislative Assistant
Connolly, Melissa
Legislative Assistant
Connolly, Melissa
Legislative Assistant
Connolly, Melissa
Legislative Assistant
Connolly, Melissa
Legislative Assistant
Morton, Lisette
Legislative Director
Connolly, Melissa
Legislative Assistant
Connolly, Melissa
Legislative Assistant
Connolly, Melissa
Legislative Assistant
Connolly, Melissa
Legislative Assistant
Doty, John
Washington Director
Morton, Lisette
Legislative Director
Morton, Lisette
Legislative Director
Gottheim, Robert
District Director; Office Manager
Morton, Lisette
Legislative Director
Connolly, Melissa
Legislative Assistant
Connolly, Melissa
Legislative Assistant
Connolly, Melissa
Legislative Assistant
Morton, Lisette
Legislative Director
Freeman, Ben
Legislative Assistant; Press Assistant
Morton, Lisette
Legislative Director
Connolly, Melissa
Legislative Assistant
Connolly, Melissa
Legislative Assistant
Blank, Jacqueline
Staff Assistant; Scheduler
Connolly, Melissa
Legislative Assistant
Doty, John
Washington Director
Freeman, Ben
Legislative Assistant; Press Assistant
Gottheim, Robert
District Director; Office Manager
Kremen, Maya
Brooklyn Director; Senior Advisor
Libby, Gabriella
Systems Administrator; Staff Assistant
Mizrahi, Celine
Director of Community Relations
Morton, Lisette
Legislative Director
Rutkin, Amy
Chief of Staff
Siegel, Janice
Director of Operations; Scheduler
Wallach, Ellen
Director of Constituent Services
Wett, Jessica
Constituent Services Representative
Libby, Gabriella
Systems Administrator; Staff Assistant
Kremen, Maya
Brooklyn Director; Senior Advisor
Rutkin, Amy
Chief of Staff
Doty, John
Washington Director
Gottheim, Robert
District Director; Office Manager
Kremen, Maya
Brooklyn Director; Senior Advisor
Mizrahi, Celine
Director of Community Relations
Siegel, Janice
Director of Operations; Scheduler
Wallach, Ellen
Director of Constituent Services
Connolly, Melissa
Legislative Assistant
Freeman, Ben
Legislative Assistant; Press Assistant
Morton, Lisette
Legislative Director
Gottheim, Robert
District Director; Office Manager
Freeman, Ben
Legislative Assistant; Press Assistant
Wett, Jessica
Constituent Services Representative
Blank, Jacqueline
Staff Assistant; Scheduler
Siegel, Janice
Director of Operations; Scheduler
Blank, Jacqueline
Staff Assistant; Scheduler
Libby, Gabriella
Systems Administrator; Staff Assistant
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Jerrold Nadler Committees
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Jerrold Nadler Biography
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  • Elected: Nov. 1992, 11th full term.
  • District: New York 10
  • Born: Jun. 13, 1947, Brooklyn
  • Home: Manhattan
  • Education:

    Columbia U., B.A. 1970, Fordham U., J.D. 1978

  • Professional Career:

    Legis. asst., NY Assembly, 1972; Law clerk, 1976.

  • Political Career:

    NY Assembly, 1976–92.

  • Ethnicity: White/Caucasian
  • Religion:

    Jewish

  • Family: Married (Joyce Miller); 1 children

Democrat Jerrold Nadler, first elected in 1992, is among the House’s most outspoken liberals, with a strong civil libertarian bent. He has become increasingly vocal in economic debates and, in 2013, proposed minting a trillion-dollar coin as a way to circumvent the need to raise the federal debt limit. Read More

Democrat Jerrold Nadler, first elected in 1992, is among the House’s most outspoken liberals, with a strong civil libertarian bent. He has become increasingly vocal in economic debates and, in 2013, proposed minting a trillion-dollar coin as a way to circumvent the need to raise the federal debt limit.

Nadler was born in Brooklyn and moved around with his family as a child. His parents bought a chicken farm in New Jersey, but the business failed, and they moved back to the city. His father ran a gas station on Long Island and owned an auto parts store. Interested in politics from a young age, Nadler campaigned for Democrat Eugene McCarthy for president while at Columbia University, where he roomed with Dick Morris, who would later become a top adviser to President Bill Clinton. The two were at Columbia during the 1968 campus riots.

After getting his law degree from Fordham University, Nadler ran for the New York Assembly in 1976, at age 29. In the primary, he beat Ruth Messinger, the Democratic nominee for mayor in 1997, by 73 votes. In 1992, he was suddenly presented with the opportunity to run for Congress. Ted Weiss, long an Upper West Side icon, died the day before the September primary, which he won posthumously. The nomination was decided by a convention of almost 1,000 county Democratic committee members. Nadler won 62% of the votes to secure the nomination and thus the election. He has not been seriously challenged since.

In the House’s Nadler’s leftward leanings are evident in his open fondness for the New Deal. He told a New York audience in October 2012 that President Franklin Roosevelt’s economic program “put into practice regulations on corporations and banks to prevent economic catastrophes—regulations that worked until they were dismantled, starting in the 1980s.” He said Republicans have been misguided in cutting social programs and in letting large corporations such as Exxon Mobil pay little or nothing in taxes. He considers the periodic vote to raise the debt ceiling a form of GOP “blackmail,” and in January 2013 embraced the trillion-dollar coin idea, which had bubbled up from economic blogs. “It sounds silly, but it’s absolutely legal,” he told the website Capital New York before the White House shot down the idea. He doesn’t confine his criticism to the GOP. After Hurricane Sandy ravaged New York and other states in October 2012, he said the Federal Emergency Management Agency was ill-equipped to handle large urban disasters and that New York City needed higher seawalls and waterproofed electric power facilities.

As the top Democrat on the Judiciary Committee’s Constitution Subcommittee, Nadler has been a counterweight to lawmakers of both parties seeking expanded police powers to crack down on terrorism. It is not because Nadler, as the representative of the site of the September 11 attacks, is unsympathetic to their cause. But he has worked to protect detainees’ habeas corpus rights. When the House voted in September 2012 to extend the warrantless wiretapping program, he bemoaned how much power it gave to presidents. In 2008, he sponsored a bill requiring the Federal Bureau of Investigation to surmount higher legal hurdles before being allowed to use “national security letters,” which are government demands for information not subject to judicial review. He vigorously opposed the USA PATRIOT Act, the Bush administration’s centerpiece anti-terrorism law.

Nadler has little regard for most of the Republican-backed social legislation that makes its way to the Judiciary Committee or for the tea party conservatives who support strict interpretations of the Constitution. “You are not supposed to worship your Constitution; you’re supposed to govern your government by it,” he told The Washington Post in January 2011. He led the fight in the House against conservative proposals to ban same-sex marriage and, in early 2013, blasted the National Rifle Association’s unyielding resistance to gun control legislation in the wake of the Newtown, Conn., school massacre. He called the NRA’s suggestion of putting armed guards in schools “ludicrous and insulting.” In early 2009, Nadler held hearings to document what he viewed as the “criminal” abuses of the George W. Bush administration and demanded that former Bush aide Karl Rove testify about the “politicization of the Justice Department” after the firing of several U.S. attorneys around the country allegedly for political reasons.

On foreign policy, Nadler has been a staunch supporter of Israel, but he opposed the Iraq war resolution in 2002. Regarding Afghanistan, he said in July 2010: “An intelligent policy is not to try to remake a country that nobody since Genghis Khan has managed to conquer.” He offered an amendment to a spending bill in February 2011 to defund military operations there that lost overwhelmingly, 98-331. He also was among the Democrats who criticized President Barack Obama in 2011 for intervening militarily in Libya without congressional approval.

For more than a decade now, Nadler has been involved in post-September 11 issues. In late 2010, he helped steer into law a long-delayed measure providing more than $4 billion in compensation to first responders suffering health problems—a development he called “without a doubt the proudest moment of my 34-year career in government.” Right after the attacks, he helped provide $20 billion for rebuilding, and he spearheaded numerous actions on behalf of affected families and small businesses.

As the Northeast’s most senior Democrat on the Transportation and Infrastructure Committee, Nadler has fought to get more rail competition east of the Hudson and to save Amtrak. His biggest project has been a rail-freight tunnel under the Hudson. Lack of a rail-freight line means that New York gets only a tiny share of its freight by rail; a new line could mean cheaper freight and therefore lower consumer prices. Mayor Michael Bloomberg initially sided with neighborhood groups in Queens that object to the plan because it would increase noise, but in 2009, he reversed himself and called it “a good long-term solution.”

Nadler also has been a strong proponent of the Obama administration’s commitment to high-speed passenger rail, which many Republicans have rejected as too expensive. “It simply makes no sense to travel by air between New York and D.C. or Boston, or frankly between any cities within a 500-mile radius,” he said in February 2011. Nadler also successfully fought developer Donald Trump’s attempts to alter the West Side Highway to accommodate his luxury housing project on old rail yards between 59th and 72nd Streets. Trump in turn called Nadler a “hack.”

Nadler has been open about his decision to undergo stomach-reduction surgery in 2002 to combat obesity. The 5-foot-4 Nadler weighed as much as 338 pounds before the procedure but lost more than 60 pounds within three months. “I want to live to see my grandchildren grow up,” he told The New York Times.

Show Less
Jerrold Nadler Election Results
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2012 General
Jerrold Nadler (D)
Votes: 165,743
Percent: 80.76%
Michael Chan (R)
Votes: 39,413
Percent: 19.24%
2012 Primary
Jerrold Nadler (D)
Unopposed
Prior Winning Percentages
2010 (76%), 2008 (80%), 2006 (85%), 2004 (81%), 2002 (76%), 2000 (81%), 1998 (86%), 1996 (82%), 1994 (82%), 1992 (81%), 1992 special (100%)
Jerrold Nadler Votes and Bills
Back to top NJ Vote Ratings

National Journal’s rating system is an objective method of analyzing voting. The liberal score means that the lawmaker’s votes were more liberal than that percentage of his colleagues’ votes. The conservative score means his votes were more conservative than that percentage of his colleagues’ votes. The composite score is an average of a lawmaker’s six issue-based scores. See all NJ Voting

More Liberal
More Conservative
2013 2012 2011
Economic 91 (L) : - (C) 89 (L) : - (C) 92 (L) : - (C)
Social 73 (L) : 24 (C) 85 (L) : - (C) 80 (L) : - (C)
Foreign 94 (L) : - (C) 89 (L) : 8 (C) 84 (L) : 16 (C)
Composite 89.0 (L) : 11.0 (C) 92.5 (L) : 7.5 (C) 90.0 (L) : 10.0 (C)
Interest Group Ratings

The vote ratings by 10 special interest groups provide insight into a lawmaker’s general ideology and the degree to which he or she agrees with the group’s point of view. Two organizations provide just one combined rating for 2011 and 2012, the two sessions of the 112th Congress. They are the ACLU and the ITIC. About the interest groups.

20112012
FRC100
LCV9794
CFG1212
ITIC-50
NTU1614
20112012
COC20-
ACLU-100
ACU40
ADA100100
AFSCME100-
Key House Votes

The key votes show how a member of Congress voted on the major bills of the year. N indicates a "no" vote; Y a "yes" vote. If a member voted "present" or was absent, the bill caption is not shown. For a complete description of the bills included in key votes, see the Almanac's Guide to Usage.

    • Pass GOP budget
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • End fiscal cliff
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Extend payroll tax cut
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Find AG in contempt
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • Stop student loan hike
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • Repeal health care
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • Raise debt limit
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Pass cut, cap, balance
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Defund Planned Parenthood
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Repeal lightbulb ban
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Add endangered listings
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Speed troop withdrawal
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Regulate financial firms
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2010
    • Pass tax cuts for some
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2010
    • Stop detainee transfers
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2010
    • Legalize immigrants' kids
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2010
    • Repeal don't ask, tell
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2010
    • Limit campaign funds
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2010
    • Overturn Ledbetter
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Pass $820 billion stimulus
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Let guns in national parks
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Pass cap-and-trade
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Bar federal abortion funds
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Pass health care bill
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Bail out financial markets
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2008
    • Repeal D.C. gun law
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2008
    • Overhaul FISA
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2008
    • Increase minimum wage
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
    • Expand SCHIP
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
    • Raise CAFE standards
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
    • Share immigration data
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • Foreign aid abortion ban
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • Ban gay bias in workplace
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • Withdraw troops 8/08
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
    • No operations in Iran
    • Vote:
    • Year: 2007
    • Free trade with Peru
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
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