Skip Navigation

Close and don't show again.

Your browser is out of date.

You may not get the full experience here on National Journal.

Please upgrade your browser to any of the following supported browsers:

Patty Murray Patty Murray

NEXT :
This ad will end in seconds
 
Close X

Want access to this content? Learn More »

Forget Your Password?

Don't have an account? Register »

Reveal Navigation
 

 

Almanac

Search

Enter your search query or use our Advanced People Search. Need Help? View our search tips

View Saved Lists
View Saved Lists
Democrat

Sen. Patty Murray (D)

Leadership: Democratic Conference Secretary
Patty Murray Contact
Back to top
Email: n/a
DC Contact Information

Phone: 202-224-2621

Address: 154 RSOB, DC 20510

State Office Contact Information

Phone: (206) 553-5545

Address: 915 Second Avenue, Seattle WA 98174-1003

Spokane WA

Phone: (509) 624-9515

Fax: (509) 624-9561

Address: 10 North Post Street, Spokane WA 99201-0707

Tacoma WA

Phone: (253) 572-3636

Fax: (253) 572-9488

Address: 950 Pacific Avenue, Tacoma WA 98402-4450

Vancouver WA

Phone: (360) 696-7797

Fax: (360) 696-7798

Address: 1323 Officers Row, Vancouver WA 98661-3856

Yakima WA

Phone: (509) 453-7462

Fax: (509) 453-7731

Address: 402 East Yakima Avenue, Yakima WA 98901-2760

Everett WA

Phone: (425) 259-6515

Fax: (425) 259-7152

Address: 2930 Wetmore Avenue, Everett WA 98201-4067

Patty Murray Staff
Back to top
Cornett, Jake
Legislative Assistant
Goodwin, Adam
Legislative Assistant
Eckert, Josephine
Legislative Assistant
Evans, Ariel
Legislative Aide
Eckert, Josephine
Legislative Assistant
Goodwin, Adam
Legislative Assistant
Gage, Carrie
Legislative Assistant
Mallove, Zach
Legislative Aide
Cornett, Jake
Legislative Assistant
Mallove, Zach
Legislative Aide
Evans, Ariel
Legislative Aide
Goodwin, Adam
Legislative Assistant
Merkel, Benjamin
Legislative Aide
Teeter-Baker, Alyson
Constituent Services Representative
Cornett, Jake
Legislative Assistant
Cornett, Jake
Legislative Assistant
Cornett, Jake
Legislative Assistant
Evans, Ariel
Legislative Aide
O'Neill, Ed
Deputy State Director for Community Outreach
Cornett, Jake
Legislative Assistant
Eckert, Josephine
Legislative Assistant
Bills, Shawn
Legislative Director
Evans, Ariel
Legislative Aide
Sperling, Anna
Legislative Assistant
Cornett, Jake
Legislative Assistant
Gage, Carrie
Legislative Assistant
Mallove, Zach
Legislative Aide
Eckert, Josephine
Legislative Assistant
Evans, Ariel
Legislative Aide
Mace, Ryan
Legislative Assistant
Gage, Carrie
Legislative Assistant
O'Neill, Ed
Deputy State Director for Community Outreach
Gage, Carrie
Legislative Assistant
O'Neill, Ed
Deputy State Director for Community Outreach
Lazaro, Richard
Federal Funding Liaison
O'Neill, Ed
Deputy State Director for Community Outreach
Merkel, Benjamin
Legislative Aide
Cornett, Jake
Legislative Assistant
Goodwin, Adam
Legislative Assistant
Merkel, Benjamin
Legislative Aide
Bills, Shawn
Legislative Director
Gage, Carrie
Legislative Assistant
Thornton, Rebecca
Regional Central Washington Director
Cornett, Jake
Legislative Assistant
Cornett, Jake
Legislative Assistant
Mace, Ryan
Legislative Assistant
Eckert, Josephine
Legislative Assistant
Mace, Ryan
Legislative Assistant
Lazaro, Richard
Federal Funding Liaison
O'Neill, Ed
Deputy State Director for Community Outreach
Evans, Ariel
Legislative Aide
Bills, Shawn
Legislative Director
Sperling, Anna
Legislative Assistant
Evans, Ariel
Legislative Aide
Goodwin, Adam
Legislative Assistant
Merkel, Benjamin
Legislative Aide
Teeter-Baker, Alyson
Constituent Services Representative
Bills, Shawn
Legislative Director
Sperling, Anna
Legislative Assistant
Bills, Shawn
Legislative Director
Evans, Ariel
Legislative Aide
Sperling, Anna
Legislative Assistant
Bills, Shawn
Legislative Director
Sperling, Anna
Legislative Assistant
Mace, Ryan
Legislative Assistant
Teeter-Baker, Alyson
Constituent Services Representative
Mace, Ryan
Legislative Assistant
Teeter-Baker, Alyson
Constituent Services Representative
Eckert, Josephine
Legislative Assistant
Thornton, Rebecca
Regional Central Washington Director
Cornett, Jake
Legislative Assistant
Evans, Ariel
Legislative Aide
O'Neill, Ed
Deputy State Director for Community Outreach
Goodwin, Adam
Legislative Assistant
Gage, Carrie
Legislative Assistant
Goodwin, Adam
Legislative Assistant
Cornett, Jake
Legislative Assistant
Goodwin, Adam
Legislative Assistant
Merkel, Benjamin
Legislative Aide
Bills, Shawn
Legislative Director
Gage, Carrie
Legislative Assistant
O'Neill, Ed
Deputy State Director for Community Outreach
Eckert, Josephine
Legislative Assistant
Goodwin, Adam
Legislative Assistant
Merkel, Benjamin
Legislative Aide
Teeter-Baker, Alyson
Constituent Services Representative
Bills, Shawn
Legislative Director
Sperling, Anna
Legislative Assistant
Babb, Shelia
Deputy State Director for Community Outreach
Bills, Shawn
Legislative Director
Chrusciel, Beth
Executive Assistant; Scheduler
Coit, Sean
Press Secretary
Cornett, Jake
Legislative Assistant
Cory, Carole
Systems Administrator; Web Manager
Cullop, Amie
Southwest Washington Regional Representative
Culton, John
Eastern Washington Director
Deng, Philip
Constituent Services Representative; Intern Coordinator
Eckert, Josephine
Legislative Assistant
Evans, Ariel
Legislative Aide
Fastle, Alex
Regional Director (Kitsap/Olympic Peninsula)
Fox, Flannery
Staff Assistant
Fulkerson, Emma
Deputy Floor Director
Gage, Carrie
Legislative Assistant
Glenn, Mary
Constituent Services Representative
Goodwin, Adam
Legislative Assistant
Hernandez-Sahagun, Osbaldo
Constituent Services Representative
Hodges, David
Southwest Regional Director
Lazaro, Richard
Federal Funding Liaison
Mace, Ryan
Legislative Assistant
Mallove, Zach
Legislative Aide
Mauer, Matthew
Constituent Services Representative
McLane, Nick
Staff Assistant
Merkel, Benjamin
Legislative Aide
O'Neill, Ed
Deputy State Director for Community Outreach
Phifer, Kierra
South Sound Director
Quezada, Evelyn
Eastern Washington Regional Representative
Rich, Stacy
Floor Director
Roh, Meghan
Press Secretary
Seabott, Ann
Northwest Regional Director
Seidl, Alexa
Assistant to the Chief of Staff; Deputy Scheduler
Spahn, Mike
Chief of Staff
Sperling, Anna
Legislative Assistant
Stebbins, Bryan
Constituent Services Representative
Teeter-Baker, Alyson
Constituent Services Representative
Thornton, Rebecca
Regional Central Washington Director
Whittier, Katie
King County Director
Zupnick, Eli
Communications Director
Cory, Carole
Systems Administrator; Web Manager
Evans, Ariel
Legislative Aide
Mallove, Zach
Legislative Aide
Merkel, Benjamin
Legislative Aide
Seidl, Alexa
Assistant to the Chief of Staff; Deputy Scheduler
Spahn, Mike
Chief of Staff
Zupnick, Eli
Communications Director
Deng, Philip
Constituent Services Representative; Intern Coordinator
Babb, Shelia
Deputy State Director for Community Outreach
Culton, John
Eastern Washington Director
Fastle, Alex
Regional Director (Kitsap/Olympic Peninsula)
Fulkerson, Emma
Deputy Floor Director
Hodges, David
Southwest Regional Director
O'Neill, Ed
Deputy State Director for Community Outreach
Phifer, Kierra
South Sound Director
Rich, Stacy
Floor Director
Seabott, Ann
Northwest Regional Director
Thornton, Rebecca
Regional Central Washington Director
Whittier, Katie
King County Director
Chrusciel, Beth
Executive Assistant; Scheduler
Cornett, Jake
Legislative Assistant
Eckert, Josephine
Legislative Assistant
Gage, Carrie
Legislative Assistant
Goodwin, Adam
Legislative Assistant
Mace, Ryan
Legislative Assistant
Sperling, Anna
Legislative Assistant
Bills, Shawn
Legislative Director
Lazaro, Richard
Federal Funding Liaison
Cory, Carole
Systems Administrator; Web Manager
Coit, Sean
Press Secretary
Roh, Meghan
Press Secretary
Cullop, Amie
Southwest Washington Regional Representative
Deng, Philip
Constituent Services Representative; Intern Coordinator
Glenn, Mary
Constituent Services Representative
Hernandez-Sahagun, Osbaldo
Constituent Services Representative
Mauer, Matthew
Constituent Services Representative
Quezada, Evelyn
Eastern Washington Regional Representative
Stebbins, Bryan
Constituent Services Representative
Teeter-Baker, Alyson
Constituent Services Representative
Chrusciel, Beth
Executive Assistant; Scheduler
Seidl, Alexa
Assistant to the Chief of Staff; Deputy Scheduler
Fox, Flannery
Staff Assistant
McLane, Nick
Staff Assistant
Note: You can only itemize lists in the Interests and Title sections
Save List
X

Your saved lists will appear under My Saved Lists on The Almanac's landing page.

Patty Murray Committees
Back to top
Budget (Chairman)
Patty Murray Biography
Back to top
  • Elected: 1992, term expires 2016, 4th term.
  • State: Washington
  • Born: Oct. 11, 1950, Seattle
  • Home: Seattle
  • Education:

    WA St. U., B.A. 1972

  • Political Career:

    Shoreline Schl. Bd., 1985–89, Pres., 1985–86; WA Senate, 1988–92.

  • Ethnicity: White/Caucasian
  • Religion:

    Catholic

  • Family: Married (Rob); 2 children

Patty Murray is the senior senator from Washington, first elected in 1992. She has come a long way from her entry into politics as a parent-activist. Murray is now a powerful Senate backroom player, with a key role in advancing the Democrats’ position on budget issues and in helping the party retain its Senate majority in 2012. Read More

Patty Murray is the senior senator from Washington, first elected in 1992. She has come a long way from her entry into politics as a parent-activist. Murray is now a powerful Senate backroom player, with a key role in advancing the Democrats’ position on budget issues and in helping the party retain its Senate majority in 2012.

Murray grew up in the Seattle suburb of Bothell, one of seven children of a disabled World War II veteran. She graduated from Washington State University in 1972, married, and stayed home to raise her children. In 1980, she was in Olympia trying to save a parent education class she was teaching at Shoreline Community College, which was the target of budget cuts. A state legislator told her gruffly, “You’re just a mom in tennis shoes. You can’t make a difference.” As she said later, “Almost every woman I’ve ever met in politics got into it because she was mad about something.” She won her fight over the parents’ class and then ran for the Shoreline School District board. She eventually was chosen board president. In 1988, she challenged a Republican state senator, knocked on 17,000 doors and won the seat. Then in late 1991, Murray decided to run against U.S. Sen. Brock Adams, a Democrat who was under a cloud following charges of sexual harassment. He ultimately decided not to seek reelection.

Amid a crowd of better-known, conventional male politicians, Murray, with her flat, Midwestern-style accent and “mom in tennis shoes” line, attracted most of the attention. In the 1992 all-party primary, her main Democratic opponent was former U.S. Rep. Don Bonker, who had narrowly lost a Senate nomination in 1988. But Murray won 28% of the vote to Bonker’s 19%. She then sprinted to a big lead in polls against Republican U.S. Rep. Rod Chandler, winning 54%-46% in November.

In the Senate, Murray has had a largely liberal voting record. In 2012, she was the fifth most-liberal senator, according to National Journal’s annual rankings. But she is known for being attuned to the needs of more conservative members. “She’s a pretty good arbiter and proxy for the caucus as a whole,” Rich Tarplin, a lobbyist close to Senate Democrats, told National Journal. Murray generally leaves the spotlight to others, but does not shy from openly taking on administration officials. In what she calls her “angry mom” voice, she has rebuked Republican and Democratic secretaries of the Department of Veterans Affairs for proposals that would make veterans pay more for health care. “Ask my kids about it,” she said of such confrontations to The Olympian newspaper in October 2010. “There is a line they knew they shouldn’t cross.”

Murray assumed the chairmanship of the Budget Committee in January 2013, replacing North Dakota’s retired Kent Conrad. To counter the controversial budget proposal offered by her House counterpart, Wisconsin Republican Paul Ryan, she unveiled a proposed fiscal 2014 budget that was the first from her party since 2009. It included about $1 trillion in new revenues while advocating the closing of tax loopholes and incentives to match about $1 trillion in spending cuts. Unlike Ryan’s budget, which some House GOP moderates found draconian, her plan was geared toward getting broad Democratic support. It included $100 billion for a new “economic recovery protection plan” that would fund infrastructure projects and education programs. But in something of a surprise, it contained more than double the cuts to the biggest health entitlement, Medicare, than Ryan’s. Though Republicans vilified her proposal as unworkable, they said Murray was easy to work with. “You’ve allowed us to have free ability to speak out; you’ve been respectful,” Budget ranking Republican Jeff Sessions of Alabama told her at a hearing.

Her ability to work with lawmakers on the other side of the aisle was also critical in late 2013 as Congress sought to avoid another budget showdown like the one that shuttered the government for 16 days in October. Congressional Republicans especially suffered in public opinion polls as a result of the unpopular government shutdown. In December, Murray began meeting quietly with Ryan to come up with a short-term spending plan to replace automatic cuts that had gone into effect in the absence of a bipartisan budget deal. The two sought to find a middle ground between the $967 billion in sequestration-level spending and the roughly $1 trillion level favored by Senate Democrats, according to Politico.

The Budget chairmanship represented Murray’s second turn as a leader on the issue. After the protrated standoff over raising the federal debt limit in 2011, she and Texas Republican Rep. Jeb Hensarling were named as co-chairs of the Joint Select Committee on Deficit Reduction, the “super committee” charged with finding a bipartisan consensus on future spending in just a few months. To almost no one’s surprise, the effort was fruitless, but she said it was important for her to stick to her guns. “The one thing the Republicans wouldn’t put on the table was revenue,” Murray told The Seattle Times about her experience. “I knew what a bad deal would mean for the middle class in this country. Many of us are where we are in our lives because we had a country that was there for us.”

On the Appropriations Committee, Murray also is influential and makes a point of getting along with more senior senators. After Alaska’s Ted Stevens, the former GOP chairman, lost his bid for reelection in 2008, he gave Murray the desk that once belonged to legendary Washington Democrat Warren Magnuson (1944-81). And when West Virginia Democrat Robert Byrd was too ill in 2007 and 2008 to manage spending bills on the floor as chairman, he gave Murray the task ahead of more-senior members. Murray chairs the Appropriations subcommittee on transportation and housing and urban development. She has delivered for the state, and then some: $219 million in home-state projects in 2010, which was the ninth highest amount among senators that year. The Washington watchdog group Taxpayers for Common Sense dubbed her the “Queen of Pork.” Despite a subsequent ban on earmarking, Murray still worked to include funding for a variety of Washington projects in the fiscal 2013 bill, including money for a Seattle light-rail system and a bridge over the Columbia River.

In the 2012 election, Murray chaired the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee, the Senate Democrats’ campaign recruiting and fundraising arm. Several of her colleagues had reportedly turned down the post, prompting Majority Leader Harry Reid and others to persuade her that she could succeed in the job. The assignment was daunting: Twenty-three Democratic senators faced reelection in 2012. But even her political opponents predicted that she would not be outworked. “She’s a mechanic, not a visionary. But she’s really good at it,” said Chris Vance, a former chairman of Washington’s Republican Party. Not only were Murray and fellow Democrats able to hold the Senate, they picked up two seats. They got some fortunate breaks, most notably the disastrous comments on rape and abortion by Republicans Todd Akin in Missouri and Richard Mourdock in Indiana that spelled their political doom in those races. But Murray also recruited a number of successful female candidates, such as Massachusetts’ Elizabeth Warren, Wisconsin’s Tammy Baldwin, and North Dakota’s Heidi Heitkamp. “Oftentimes, when you're looking at people to run, they rule the women out, saying they can’t win,” Murray told The Oregonian of Portland. “I ruled them in.”

It was Murray’s second stint in the role. She led the DSCC in the 2002 election cycle and had less fortune then. She nearly doubled the committee’s fundraising, bringing in $158 million during the cycle, and her recruiting efforts were mostly successful. But the results were disappointing for her. Democrats lost more seats than they won, and they lost their Senate majority. Still, Murray’s efforts got high marks. In 2004, Reid appointed Murray assistant floor leader, and after Democrats won back the majority in 2006, her colleagues elected her Democratic Conference Secretary, the fourth-ranking position in the leadership.

To take the Budget chairmanship, Murray gave up the helm of the Veterans’ Affairs Committee. She has long been one of the most persistent advocates for veterans’ funding, and during the 2011 debt-limit negotiations she aggressively rejected a Republican proposal to expose veterans’ benefits to steep domestic and military spending cuts. She has sponsored bills for more benefits for National Guard and Reserve troops called up to active duty, and she successfully fought for more health care funding for veterans of the Iraq and Afghanistan conflicts. Republicans initially rejected her attempt to add $2 billion for veterans’ health care, but relented and added $1.5 billion after it was revealed that the VA was using dated cost estimates and expected a shortfall.

In her first years, Murray was criticized as too staff reliant, but she grew into the role of senator. She immersed herself in Washington state issues, becoming one of the Senate’s staunchest proponents of normal trade relations with China, a position strongly backed by Boeing. Murray also has worked to remove restrictions on abortion rights and has prevailed in the Senate on legislation allowing abortions in military hospitals. With then-Democratic Sen. Hillary Clinton of New York, she waged a fight with the Bush administration regarding the approval of over-the-counter sales of the Plan B contraceptive.

Murray has won reelection three times by steadily diminishing margins. In 1998, she was challenged by U.S. Rep. Linda Smith, a Republican and a strong opponent of abortion and free trade deals. Murray raised far more money than Smith and won 58%-42%. In 2004, she faced Republican George Nethercutt, another House member, who in 1994 earned a reputation as a giant killer by defeating Democratic House Speaker Tom Foley. But the former mom in tennis shoes had become a hardball fundraiser: An aide put out the word to lobbyists that the senator would regard contributions to Nethercutt as hostile, even if contributors gave to her too. Murray raised $11.5 million, much more than Nethercutt’s $7.7 million. He campaigned vigorously, and big-name Republicans came in for him. On Election Day, Murray won 55%-43%. It was almost as if the election had been held in two states: Nethercutt carried every county east of the Cascades, and Murray carried all but two counties to the west.

Republicans initially considered Murray vulnerable in 2010. They landed a top-tier recruit in former state Sen. Dino Rossi, a fiscal conservative who had twice run impressive but losing campaigns against Democratic Gov. Christine Gregoire. He criticized her involvement in shaping the Democratic agenda. But Murray did not back down from her record and said Rossi would bankrupt the nation by giving tax breaks to the wealthy. She got a substantial boost from Boeing, whose machinists’ union called her reelection its top priority, and from campaign stops by Vice President Joe Biden and first lady Michelle Obama. She won 52%-48%. Exit polls showed Murray beating Rossi among women, 56%-44%. And even though national Republicans won the senior citizens’ vote by 19 percentage points, Murray carried it by 10 points.

Show Less
Patty Murray Election Results
Back to top
2010 General
Patty Murray (D)
Votes: 1,314,930
Percent: 52.36%
Spent: $17,124,667
Dino Rossi
Votes: 1,196,164
Percent: 47.64%
Spent: $9,643,395
2010 Primary
Patty Murray (D)
Votes: 670,284
Percent: 46.0%
Dino Rossi
Votes: 483,305
Percent: 33.0%
Clint Didier
Votes: 185,304
Percent: 13.0%
Prior Winning Percentages
2004 (55%), 1998 (58%), 1992 (54%)
Patty Murray Votes and Bills
Back to top NJ Vote Ratings

National Journal’s rating system is an objective method of analyzing voting. The liberal score means that the lawmaker’s votes were more liberal than that percentage of his colleagues’ votes. The conservative score means his votes were more conservative than that percentage of his colleagues’ votes. The composite score is an average of a lawmaker’s six issue-based scores. See all NJ Voting

More Liberal
More Conservative
2013 2012 2011
Economic 71 (L) : 28 (C) 91 (L) : 8 (C) 88 (L) : - (C)
Social 73 (L) : - (C) 64 (L) : - (C) 52 (L) : - (C)
Foreign 71 (L) : - (C) 85 (L) : - (C) 55 (L) : 41 (C)
Composite 81.2 (L) : 18.8 (C) 88.7 (L) : 11.3 (C) 75.7 (L) : 24.3 (C)
Interest Group Ratings

The vote ratings by 10 special interest groups provide insight into a lawmaker’s general ideology and the degree to which he or she agrees with the group’s point of view. Two organizations provide just one combined rating for 2011 and 2012, the two sessions of the 112th Congress. They are the ACLU and the ITIC. About the interest groups.

20112012
FRC140
LCV10093
CFG165
ITIC-100
NTU128
20112012
COC55-
ACLU-75
ACU50
ADA95100
AFSCME100-
Key Senate Votes

The key votes show how a member of Congress voted on the major bills of the year. N indicates a "no" vote; Y a "yes" vote. If a member voted "present" or was absent, the bill caption is not shown. For a complete description of the bills included in key votes, see the Almanac's Guide to Usage.

    • End fiscal cliff
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Block faith exemptions
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Approve gas pipeline
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • Approve farm bill
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Let cyber bill proceed
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Block Gitmo transfers
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • Raise debt limit
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Pass balanced budget amendment
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Stop EPA climate regulations
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Proceed to Cordray vote
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Require talking filibuster
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Limit Fannie/Freddie
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Regulate financial firms
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2010
    • Pass tax cuts for some
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2010
    • Legalize immigrants' kids
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2010
    • Ratify New START
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2010
    • Confirm Elena Kagan
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2010
    • Stop EPA climate regs
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2010
    • Repeal don't ask, tell
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2010
    • Overturn Ledbetter
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Block release of TARP funds
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Pass $787 billion stimulus
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Repeal DC gun laws
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Confirm Sonia Sotomayor
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Pass health care bill
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Bar budget rules for climate bill
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Pass 2010 budget resolution
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Let judges adjust mortgages
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Allow FDA to regulate tobacco
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Protect gays from hate crimes
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Cut F-22 funds
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Label North Korea terrorist state
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Build Guantanamo replacement
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Allow federal funds for abortion
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Cap greenhouse gases
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2008
    • Bail out financial markets
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2008
    • Increase missile defense $
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2008
    • Overhaul FISA
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2008
    • Raise CAFE standards
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
    • Expand SCHIP
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
    • Make English official language
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • Path to citizenship
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
    • Fetus is unborn child
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • Prosecute hate crimes
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
    • Withdraw troops 3/08
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
    • Iran guard is terrorist group
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
Read More
Patty Murray Leadership Staff
Back to top
Spahn, Mike
Staff Director
Spahn, Mike
Staff Director
Note: You can only itemize lists in the Interests and Title sections
Save List
X

Your saved lists will appear under My Saved Lists on The Almanac's landing page.

 
Browse The Almanac
Congressional Leadership
and Committees

House Committees
Senate Committees
Joint Committees
Leadership Roster
About Almanac
almanac cover
The Almanac is a members-only database of searchable profiles compiled and adapted from the Almanac of American Politics. Comprehensive online profiles include biographical and political summaries of elected officials, campaign expenditures, voting records, interest-group ratings, and congressional staff look-ups. In-depth overviews of each state and house district are included as well, along with demographic data, analysis of voting trends, and political histories.
Members: Buy the book at 25% off retail.
Order Now
Need Help?

Contact Us:

202.266.7900 | membership@nationaljournal.com