Skip Navigation

Close and don't show again.

Your browser is out of date.

You may not get the full experience here on National Journal.

Please upgrade your browser to any of the following supported browsers:

Jim Moran Jim Moran

NEXT :
This ad will end in seconds
 
Close X

Want access to this content? Learn More »

Forget Your Password?

Don't have an account? Register »

Reveal Navigation
 

 

Almanac

Search

Enter your search query or use our Advanced People Search. Need Help? View our search tips

View Saved Lists
View Saved Lists
Democrat

Rep. Jim Moran (D)

Jim Moran Contact
Back to top
Email: n/a
DC Contact Information

Phone: 202-225-4376

Address: 2252 RHOB, DC 20515

Websites: moran.house.gov
Jim Moran Committees
Back to top
Jim Moran Biography
Back to top
  • Elected: 1990, 12th term.
  • District: Virginia 8
  • Born: May. 16, 1945, Buffalo, NY
  • Home: Alexandria
  • Education:

    Col. of Holy Cross, B.A. 1967, attended City U. of NY, 1967-68, U. of Pittsburgh, M.P.A. 1970

  • Professional Career:

    Budget analyst & auditor, U.S. Dept. of H.E.W., 1968–74; Fiscal policy spec., Library of Congress, 1974–76; Staff, U.S. Senate Approp. Cmte., 1976–80; Investment broker, 1980–88.

  • Political Career:

    Alexandria City Cncl., 1979–82; Alexandria vice mayor, 1982–84, Alexandria mayor, 1985–90.

  • Religion:

    Catholic

  • Family: Divorced; 4 children

Democrat Jim Moran, elected in 1990, has worked his way up to a senior position on the Appropriations Committee to take care of his federally-dependent district. But his legislative work has been overshadowed at times by a combativeness that has landed him in headline-grabbing confrontations. In January 2014, he became one of numerous veteran Democrats to announce he wouldn't seek another term. Read More

Democrat Jim Moran, elected in 1990, has worked his way up to a senior position on the Appropriations Committee to take care of his federally-dependent district. But his legislative work has been overshadowed at times by a combativeness that has landed him in headline-grabbing confrontations. In January 2014, he became one of numerous veteran Democrats to announce he wouldn't seek another term.

Moran was one of seven children in an Irish Catholic family in suburban Boston. His brother Brian ran for Virginia governor in 2009 and later served as state Democratic Party chairman. His father was a professional boxer and Washington Redskins football player. Moran graduated from the College of the Holy Cross and got a master’s degree from the University of Pittsburgh. He was elected to the Alexandria City Council in 1979 and became vice mayor in 1982. Then in 1984, the first of what would be many career controversies flared, when Moran pleaded no contest to a conflict of interest charge and resigned from the Council. The charges were later dropped, and in 1985, Moran was elected mayor.

In 1990, he ran for Congress against Republican incumbent Stanford Parris. It was a nasty race. Parris said Moran was a supporter of Iraqi Leader Saddam Hussein, and Moran responded that he wanted to “break (Parris’) nose.” The major substantive issue was abortion rights; Moran ran an ad portraying Lady Liberty behind bars to demonstrate his “pro-choice” position. With a big margin in Alexandria, he won 52%-45%.

In the House, Moran has styled himself as a moderate among Democrats, though he has shown more loyalty to his caucus since President Barack Obama took office. In 1997, he co-founded the New Democrat Coalition, made up of moderate Democrats to support alternatives to liberal policies. Moran has supported free trade agreements, and he is a strong ally of the high-tech industry. He got a bill into law in 2010 aimed at cracking down on the illegal dog and cat fur trade by enforcing rules requiring that all garments containing any amount of fur list the species of the animal on the label. He introduced a bill in January 2013 to implement gun safety measures that polls showed had a majority of support from National Rifle Association members, such as universal background checks.

With a district chock full of federal employees, Moran watches out for their interests. He has taken an interest in the region’s chronic traffic problems, and he has been an energetic earmarker of funds for his district. He secured $107 million in earmarks in 2010, the fourth-highest amount among House members, according to Taxpayers for Common Sense. Despite the subsequent earmark moratorium, he said on C-SPAN in 2011 that the practice has continued among committee members. “The appropriators are going to be okay because we know people in agencies and so on,” he said.

Moran’s short temper and edgy remarks sometime land him in hot water. In 1995, he had a shoving match with California Republican Duke Cunningham on the House floor after Cunningham said that Moran had “turned his back on Desert Storm.” At an anti-war forum in 2003, Moran seemed to blame the pro-Israel lobby for the war in Iraq. “If it were not for the strong support of the Jewish community for this war with Iraq, we would not be doing this,” he said. The furious reaction prompted Moran to apologize. After Democrats lost the majority in 2010, he told an Arab television network that Republican gains came in part because “a lot of people in this country … don’t want to be governed by an African-American.” At a town hall meeting several months later, he tangled with a disabled military veteran whom the congressman accused of making “caustic” comments, a videotaped exchange that made the rounds of conservative blogs and websites.

Moran’s personal finances have raised eyebrows as well. In 2000, The Washington Post reported that a pharmaceutical company lobbyist gave Moran a $25,000 loan on generous terms. Moran quickly agreed to repay the loan and suffered no apparent political damage. More trouble followed in 2002 with reports that he borrowed $50,000 from the founder of America Online, and that MBNA, the big credit card company, had given him a favorable rate on a mortgage.

In 2004, his primary opponent was Alexandria attorney Andrew Rosenberg, a political newcomer who criticized Moran’s character and rhetoric. Moran cited his advocacy for his district and prevailed 59%-41%. He went on to win the general election easily and had uneventful reelections until 2012, when his son, Patrick, was caught on an undercover video posted by conservative activist James O’Keefe discussing possible voter fraud with someone posing as a campaign worker. Police decided not to pursue charges against the younger Moran, who resigned from his father’s campaign, but right wing bloggers expressed outrage. Nevertheless, the congressman won by more than 2-to-1.

After announcing his retirement, Moran made headlines in July 2014 when Russian officials announced he was one of 13 Americans who would be banned from entering the country. The move came in response to the United States' earlier adding of 12 names to a list of Russians sanctioned for human rights abuses. The Russians accused Moran of unspecified financial misdeeds, but he said it more likely stemmed from his sponsoring an amendment to a House-approved defense appropriations bill barring the U.S. purchase of helicopters from Rosoboronexport, the Russian state arms dealer. He called the outfit "the principal supplier to the Assad regime in Syria."

 
Show Less
Jim Moran Election Results
Back to top
2012 General
Jim Moran (D)
Votes: 226,847
Percent: 64.74%
J. Patrick Murray (R)
Votes: 107,370
Percent: 30.64%
Jason Howell (I)
Votes: 10,180
Percent: 2.91%
2012 Primary
Jim Moran (D)
Votes: 23,018
Percent: 74.19%
Bruce Shuttleworth (D)
Votes: 8,006
Percent: 25.81%
Prior Winning Percentages
2010 (61%), 2008 (68%), 2006 (66%), 2004 (60%), 2002 (60%), 2000 (63%), 1998 (67%), 1996 (66%), 1994 (59%), 1992 (56%), 1990 (52%)
Jim Moran Votes and Bills
Back to top NJ Vote Ratings

National Journal’s rating system is an objective method of analyzing voting. The liberal score means that the lawmaker’s votes were more liberal than that percentage of his colleagues’ votes. The conservative score means his votes were more conservative than that percentage of his colleagues’ votes. The composite score is an average of a lawmaker’s six issue-based scores. See all NJ Voting

More Liberal
More Conservative
2013 2012 2011
Economic 83 (L) : 16 (C) 87 (L) : 12 (C) 73 (L) : 26 (C)
Social 87 (L) : 7 (C) 66 (L) : 33 (C) 77 (L) : 22 (C)
Foreign 75 (L) : 23 (C) 79 (L) : 20 (C) 77 (L) : 23 (C)
Composite 83.2 (L) : 16.8 (C) 77.8 (L) : 22.2 (C) 76.0 (L) : 24.0 (C)
Interest Group Ratings

The vote ratings by 10 special interest groups provide insight into a lawmaker’s general ideology and the degree to which he or she agrees with the group’s point of view. Two organizations provide just one combined rating for 2011 and 2012, the two sessions of the 112th Congress. They are the ACLU and the ITIC. About the interest groups.

20112012
FRC00
LCV10091
CFG1620
ITIC-83
NTU1416
20112012
COC31-
ACLU-100
ACU40
ADA9085
AFSCME100-
Key House Votes

The key votes show how a member of Congress voted on the major bills of the year. N indicates a "no" vote; Y a "yes" vote. If a member voted "present" or was absent, the bill caption is not shown. For a complete description of the bills included in key votes, see the Almanac's Guide to Usage.

    • Pass GOP budget
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • End fiscal cliff
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • Extend payroll tax cut
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • Find AG in contempt
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • Stop student loan hike
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • Repeal health care
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • Raise debt limit
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Pass cut, cap, balance
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Defund Planned Parenthood
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Repeal lightbulb ban
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Add endangered listings
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Speed troop withdrawal
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Regulate financial firms
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2010
    • Pass tax cuts for some
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2010
    • Stop detainee transfers
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2010
    • Legalize immigrants' kids
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2010
    • Repeal don't ask, tell
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2010
    • Limit campaign funds
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2010
    • Overturn Ledbetter
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Pass $820 billion stimulus
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Let guns in national parks
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Pass cap-and-trade
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Bar federal abortion funds
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Pass health care bill
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Bail out financial markets
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2008
    • Repeal D.C. gun law
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2008
    • Overhaul FISA
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2008
    • Increase minimum wage
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
    • Expand SCHIP
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
    • Raise CAFE standards
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
    • Share immigration data
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • Foreign aid abortion ban
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • Ban gay bias in workplace
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
    • Withdraw troops 8/08
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
    • No operations in Iran
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
    • Free trade with Peru
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
Read More
 
Browse The Almanac
Congressional Leadership
and Committees

House Committees
Senate Committees
Joint Committees
Leadership Roster
About Almanac
almanac cover
The Almanac is a members-only database of searchable profiles compiled and adapted from the Almanac of American Politics. Comprehensive online profiles include biographical and political summaries of elected officials, campaign expenditures, voting records, interest-group ratings, and congressional staff look-ups. In-depth overviews of each state and house district are included as well, along with demographic data, analysis of voting trends, and political histories.
Members: Buy the book at 25% off retail.
Order Now
Need Help?

Contact Us:

202.266.7900 | membership@nationaljournal.com