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Republican

Rep. Gus Bilirakis (R)

Gus Bilirakis Contact
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Email: n/a
DC Contact Information

Phone: 202-225-5755

Address: 2313 RHOB, DC 20515

State Office Contact Information

Phone: (813) 501-4942

Address: 5901 Argerian Drive, Wesley Chapel FL 33545-4220

New Port Richey FL

Phone: (727) 232-2921

Fax: (727) 232-2923

Address: 7132 Little Road, New Port Richey FL 34654-5514

Tarpon Springs FL

Phone: (727) 940-5860

Fax: (727) 940-5861

Address: 600 Klosterman Road, Tarpon Springs FL 34689-1299

Gus Bilirakis Staff
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Sort by INTEREST NAME TITLE
Martorana, Ian
Communications Director
Pederson, Jeremy
Legislative Counsel
Power, Thomas
Legislative Director
Seum, Kristin
Legislative Correspondent
Millado, Joe
Military Legislative Assistant
Power, Thomas
Legislative Director
Millado, Joe
Military Legislative Assistant
Power, Thomas
Legislative Director
Power, Thomas
Legislative Director
Pederson, Jeremy
Legislative Counsel
Martorana, Ian
Communications Director
Pederson, Jeremy
Legislative Counsel
Martorana, Ian
Communications Director
Pederson, Jeremy
Legislative Counsel
Power, Thomas
Legislative Director
Millado, Joe
Military Legislative Assistant
Pederson, Jeremy
Legislative Counsel
Power, Thomas
Legislative Director
Millado, Joe
Military Legislative Assistant
Pederson, Jeremy
Legislative Counsel
Power, Thomas
Legislative Director
Power, Thomas
Legislative Director
Power, Thomas
Legislative Director
Power, Thomas
Legislative Director
Power, Thomas
Legislative Director
Millado, Joe
Military Legislative Assistant
Power, Thomas
Legislative Director
Martorana, Ian
Communications Director
Pederson, Jeremy
Legislative Counsel
Seum, Kristin
Legislative Correspondent
Martorana, Ian
Communications Director
Pederson, Jeremy
Legislative Counsel
Martorana, Ian
Communications Director
Pederson, Jeremy
Legislative Counsel
Millado, Joe
Military Legislative Assistant
Power, Thomas
Legislative Director
Sellas, Kristen
Casework Director; Military and Veteran's Affairs
Anderson, Hannah
Executive Assistant; Office Manager
Ciminna, Michael
Military and Veterans Caseworker
Ellison, Carol
Caseworker; Case Intake Coordinator
Hittos, Liz
Chief of Staff
Martorana, Ian
Communications Director
Millado, Joe
Military Legislative Assistant
Paasch, Daniel
District Aide
Pederson, Jeremy
Legislative Counsel
Power, Thomas
Legislative Director
Robertson, Summer
Director of Outreach
Sellas, Kristen
Casework Director; Military and Veteran's Affairs
Seum, Kristin
Legislative Correspondent
Paasch, Daniel
District Aide
Ciminna, Michael
Military and Veterans Caseworker
Ellison, Carol
Caseworker; Case Intake Coordinator
Hittos, Liz
Chief of Staff
Martorana, Ian
Communications Director
Ellison, Carol
Caseworker; Case Intake Coordinator
Pederson, Jeremy
Legislative Counsel
Robertson, Summer
Director of Outreach
Sellas, Kristen
Casework Director; Military and Veteran's Affairs
Anderson, Hannah
Executive Assistant; Office Manager
Millado, Joe
Military Legislative Assistant
Seum, Kristin
Legislative Correspondent
Power, Thomas
Legislative Director
Sellas, Kristen
Casework Director; Military and Veteran's Affairs
Anderson, Hannah
Executive Assistant; Office Manager
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Gus Bilirakis Committees
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Gus Bilirakis Biography
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  • Elected: 2006, 4th term.
  • District: Florida 12
  • Born: Feb. 08, 1963, Gainesville
  • Home: Palm Harbor
  • Education:

    Attended St. Petersburg Jr. Col., U. of FL, B.A. 1986, Stetson U., J.D. 1989

  • Professional Career:

    Intern, U.S. Pres. Ronald Reagan, 1983; Intern, NRCC, 1984; Aide, U.S. Rep. Don Sundquist, 1985; Teacher, St. Petersburg Col., 1997-2001; Practicing atty., 1989-2006.

  • Political Career:

    FL House of Reps., 1998-2006.

  • Ethnicity: White/Caucasian
  • Religion:

    Greek Orthodox

  • Family: Married (Eva Lialios); 4 children

Gus Bilirakis, a Republican first elected in 2006 to succeed his father, 12-term Republican Rep. Michael Bilirakis, came into office initially distancing himself from partisan fights and focusing on his legislative agenda. But in 2010 he joined the Tea Party Caucus, and since then has displayed a sharper rhetorical edge in criticizing Democratic initiatives. Read More

Gus Bilirakis, a Republican first elected in 2006 to succeed his father, 12-term Republican Rep. Michael Bilirakis, came into office initially distancing himself from partisan fights and focusing on his legislative agenda. But in 2010 he joined the Tea Party Caucus, and since then has displayed a sharper rhetorical edge in criticizing Democratic initiatives.

Bilirakis (bil-uh-RACK-iss) remembers stuffing envelopes at age 7 for Republican Louis “Skip” Bafalis, who lost his 1970 bid for governor but was elected to five terms in Congress. In college, Bilirakis interned in the Reagan White House and went on to earn a law degree from Stetson University. He worked for former Rep. Don Sundquist, a Republican who went on to become Tennessee’s governor, and later was a probate lawyer and estate planner. In 1998, he was elected to the first of four terms in the Florida House. Bilirakis’ career has always been closely tied to his father’s. When Michael Bilirakis decided not to seek a 13th term, his son was presumed to be the favorite for the seat and drew only nominal opposition for the Republican nomination. Gus Bilirakis was not shy about running on the family name. He touted the relationship on his website, appeared on the ballot as Gus Michael Bilirakis and raised money from many political action committees that supported his father, who had had a seat on the powerful House Energy and Commerce Committee.

Democrats recruited Phyllis Busansky, a former eight-year member of the Hillsborough County Commission and the first executive director of the state’s welfare-to-work program. Busansky played up her background in health care and senior citizens’ issues. Bilirakis pointed to his own credentials as a lawyer who specialized in elder law. In the legislature, he had also spearheaded legislation supporting community health care centers that treat the uninsured.Bilirakis’ soft-spoken style contrasted with Busansky’s assertive personality. She ran television ads portraying Bilirakis as a follower and accused him of relying on his father’s reputation. She trailed in the polls for much of the campaign, but gained some momentum in October after criticizing Bilirakis for his “deep and lucrative ties” to GOP leaders who had failed to act on knowledge of sexually explicit emails that were sent by former Republican Rep. Mark Foley of Florida to congressional pages. The national Republican Party did not leave this race to chance. President Bush, Vice President Dick Cheney, and Speaker Dennis Hastert all stumped for Bilirakis and helped him raise money. He outspent Busansky $2.6 million to $1.4 million, and won 56%-44%.

In the House, Bilirakis showed signs of centrism. Soon after taking office, he voted to increase the minimum wage. And in 2008, he worked with Rep. Lloyd Doggett, a Texas Democrat, to win House passage of a “silver alert” bill to assist states in finding senior citizens who disappear. He was one of just 10 Republicans in 2009 to support a bill to limit executive bonuses in financial companies receiving government bailout money. But in 2010, he took the House floor on several occasions to denounce the Democrats’ health care overhaul as a “government takeover.” He denounced the law’s Independent Payment Advisory Board, a cost-cutting panel charged with slowing the growth in Medicare spending, as an “unelected bureaucracy” that would trample on Congress’ oversight authority.

After the 2012 elections, Bilirakis was given a seat on the Energy and Commerce Committee, where he came under attack from left-leaning groups for earlier signing a pledge that “opposes any legislation relating to climate change that includes a net increase in government revenue.” The pledge was circulated by Americans for Prosperity, a group run by conservative activist brothers David and Charles Koch. As a member of the Homeland Security Committee, Bilirakis focused on trying to address bureaucratic inefficiencies. In 2012, he was among the panel’s critics of BioWatch, a system for detecting biological attacks that has been plagued with technical deficiencies, and of a proposal for a $744,000 soccer field for terrorist captives at the Guantanamo Bay prison in Cuba. On the Foreign Affairs Committee, he followed his father’s footsteps in standing up for Greek causes.

In 2008, Bilirakis had a surprisingly easy reelection against lawyer and former naval submarine Officer Bill Mitchell, who criticized his opposition to the financial market bailout and to a bill extending the renewable energy credit, calling him “a friend of Big Oil.” Bilirakis largely ignored the attacks and won handily, 62%-36%. He had even less trouble in 2010, winning more than two-thirds of the vote over Anita de Palma, a retired concert pianist.

Redistricting in advance of the 2012 election moved his district north to take in all of suburban Pasco County, but it remained strongly GOP turf, and he won easily again with 64%.

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Gus Bilirakis Election Results
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2012 General
Gus Bilirakis (R)
Votes: 209,604
Percent: 63.48%
Jonathan Snow (D)
Votes: 108,770
Percent: 32.94%
John Russell
Votes: 6,878
Percent: 2.08%
2012 Primary
Gus Bilirakis (R)
Unopposed
Prior Winning Percentages
2010 (71%), 2008 (62%), 2006 (56%)
Gus Bilirakis Votes and Bills
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National Journal’s rating system is an objective method of analyzing voting. The liberal score means that the lawmaker’s votes were more liberal than that percentage of his colleagues’ votes. The conservative score means his votes were more conservative than that percentage of his colleagues’ votes. The composite score is an average of a lawmaker’s six issue-based scores. See all NJ Voting

More Liberal
More Conservative
2013 2012 2011
Economic 31 (L) : 69 (C) 30 (L) : 70 (C) 46 (L) : 54 (C)
Social - (L) : 87 (C) 27 (L) : 73 (C) 27 (L) : 71 (C)
Foreign 44 (L) : 54 (C) 46 (L) : 54 (C) - (L) : 91 (C)
Composite 27.5 (L) : 72.5 (C) 34.3 (L) : 65.7 (C) 26.2 (L) : 73.8 (C)
Interest Group Ratings

The vote ratings by 10 special interest groups provide insight into a lawmaker’s general ideology and the degree to which he or she agrees with the group’s point of view. Two organizations provide just one combined rating for 2011 and 2012, the two sessions of the 112th Congress. They are the ACLU and the ITIC. About the interest groups.

20112012
FRC70100
LCV179
CFG5862
ITIC-75
NTU7071
20112012
COC94-
ACLU-0
ACU7684
ADA00
AFSCME0-
Key House Votes

The key votes show how a member of Congress voted on the major bills of the year. N indicates a "no" vote; Y a "yes" vote. If a member voted "present" or was absent, the bill caption is not shown. For a complete description of the bills included in key votes, see the Almanac's Guide to Usage.

    • Pass GOP budget
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • End fiscal cliff
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • Extend payroll tax cut
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Find AG in contempt
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Stop student loan hike
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Repeal health care
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Raise debt limit
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Pass cut, cap, balance
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Defund Planned Parenthood
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Repeal lightbulb ban
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Add endangered listings
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Speed troop withdrawal
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Regulate financial firms
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2010
    • Pass tax cuts for some
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2010
    • Stop detainee transfers
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2010
    • Legalize immigrants' kids
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2010
    • Repeal don't ask, tell
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2010
    • Limit campaign funds
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2010
    • Overturn Ledbetter
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Pass $820 billion stimulus
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Let guns in national parks
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Pass cap-and-trade
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Bar federal abortion funds
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Pass health care bill
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Bail out financial markets
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2008
    • Repeal D.C. gun law
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2008
    • Overhaul FISA
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2008
    • Increase minimum wage
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
    • Expand SCHIP
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • Raise CAFE standards
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • Share immigration data
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
    • Foreign aid abortion ban
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
    • Ban gay bias in workplace
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • Withdraw troops 8/08
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • No operations in Iran
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • Free trade with Peru
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
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The Almanac is a members-only database of searchable profiles compiled and adapted from the Almanac of American Politics. Comprehensive online profiles include biographical and political summaries of elected officials, campaign expenditures, voting records, interest-group ratings, and congressional staff look-ups. In-depth overviews of each state and house district are included as well, along with demographic data, analysis of voting trends, and political histories.
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