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Republican

Rep. Gary Miller (R)

Gary Miller Contact
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Email: n/a
DC Contact Information

Phone: 202-225-3201

Address: 2467 RHOB, DC 20515

Gary Miller Committees
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Gary Miller Biography
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  • Elected: 1998, 8th term.
  • District: California 31
  • Born: Oct. 16, 1948, Huntsville, AR
  • Home: Diamond Bar
  • Education: Mt. San Antonio Col. 1971, 1988-89
  • Professional Career: Businessman, real estate developer, G. Miller Development Co., 1971-98.
  • Military Career: Army, 1967.
  • Political Career: Diamond Bar City Cncl., 1989-95; Diamond Bar Mayor, 1992; CA Assembly, 1995-98.
  • Religion: Christian
  • Family: Married (Cathy); 4 children

Gary Miller, a Republican first elected in 1998, is a conservative who has weathered a variety of controversies and challenges to retain a seat in the House, including investigations into his personal land deals. Read More

Gary Miller, a Republican first elected in 1998, is a conservative who has weathered a variety of controversies and challenges to retain a seat in the House, including investigations into his personal land deals.

He was born in Arkansas but grew up in Whittier. In his early 20s, he became a home builder and later developed planned communities. He is among the wealthiest members of the House; in 2010, the nonpartisan Center for Responsive Politics ranked him as the chamber’s eighth richest member, with assets of at least $17 million. He began his public service in 1988, when he was appointed to the Diamond Bar Municipal Advisory Council. A year later, after Diamond Bar was incorporated, Miller was elected to the City Council and served as mayor. In 1995, he was elected to the California Assembly in a special election. After chairing the Assembly’s Budget Committee, he decided in 1997 to run for the U.S. House against scandal-tarred incumbent Republican Jay Kim, who had pleaded guilty to accepting and concealing $230,000 in illegal campaign contributions. Miller emphasized standard Republican themes—lower taxes, tougher penalties for crime, improved local education—and financed his campaign largely with his own money. He won the all-party primary with 48% to 26% for Kim. Democrats did not pose a serious challenge in November.

Since then, Miller has come under scrutiny for questionable ethics himself. Several of his land deals have been investigated by the media and the Justice Department. One involved Miller’s sale of 165 acres to the city of Monrovia, Calif. According to several published reports, he made $10 million on the deal, then avoided paying capital gains taxes by claiming the land had been threatened by an eminent domain action by Monrovia. In another case, he got a $1.28 million earmark in an appropriations bill to improve streets in front of development property he co-owned in the town of Diamond Bar. Miller has maintained that he did nothing wrong and that he was the victim of a smear campaign by Democrats. He was named in 2009 in a leak of information about members under investigation by the House Ethics Committee.

Miller has a conservative voting record in the House and became one of the Tea Party Caucus’ early members in July 2010. He drew national attention for his bill calling for an end to birthright citizenship for children of illegal immigrants born on U.S. soil.

On the Financial Services Committee, he was active on legislation to address the mortgage crisis and sought with Democrat Carolyn McCarthy of New York to merge Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac into a single entity that would be publicly owned. Breaking with other Republicans who called for the two agencies to be abolished, he said in June 2011 that such a move “would cause a massive liquidity crunch … and hamper the recovery of the housing sector and the overall economy.” The House passed his bill in March 2011 to end the Neighborhood Stabilization Program, which enabled state and local governments, as well as non-profits, to purchase, rehabilitate, and resell foreclosed properties. He and other Republicans said the program was ineffective and poorly run, but the White House stood behind it and his measure did not move in the Democratically controlled Senate. He did get another bill into law to reauthorize the U.S. Export-Import Bank in 2012.

Democrats talked about trying to unseat Miller in 2008 in light of his ethics troubles. But they failed to put up much of a fight. Miller won easily, 60%-40%, over Montebello lawyer and school board member Ed Chau in a low-budget contest.

Two years later, however, anti-incumbency sentiment led Miller to draw three GOP primary challengers: Whittier business owner Phil Liberatore, Chino investment services executive Lee McGroarty, and Diamond Bar salesman David Su. They criticized him for his support of the government rescue of the financial industry. And they seized on an article in Harper’s magazine that said several biographical entries portrayed him as serving in the Army during Vietnam, though Miller was in the service for just seven weeks before being discharged. But Miller poured money into the race, lending his campaign $475,000, and said he had not inaccurately described his military service, which he said was ended by health problems. He held on to win with 49%, with Liberatore drawing 37%, McGroarty 11%, and Su 3%.

Miller faced trouble from both the right and left in 2012. The redrawn 31st District in which he chose to run was entirely new to him; Republican Rep. Jerry Lewis represented the area, and Lewis’ decision to resign meant Miller could avoid a member-on-member challenge, which awaited him against Republican Ed Royce if he ran in his old district, which had been merged with Royce’s.

Democrats thought they had an ideal candidate to oust Miller in Redlands Mayor Pete Aguilar. But a lopsided field of candidates, an influx of outside money, and poor voter turnout led Aguilar to finish third in the top-two primary. That pitted Miller in the general election against Republican Bob Dutton, a former California Senate minority leader. Dutton kept his focus on his deep roots in the local community and his desire to fix Washington. He played up his role crafting bipartisan deals in the state legislature and adopted a moderate tone, while Miller was forced to defend unpopular House votes and hewed to the conservative line. But even though Dutton spent $150,000 of his own money on the campaign, he could not overcome Miller’s overwhelming financial advantage. Miller outspent him by more than 3-to-1 and won the race with 55% of the vote.

Miller suffered two personal tragedies in 2007. His 33-year-old daughter died for reasons that were not made public, and the children of one of his sons were abducted by their mother after a bitter custody dispute. The woman was arrested in Mexico nearly four years later.

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Gary Miller Election Results
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2012 General (Top-Two General)
Gary Miller (R)
Votes: 88,964
Percent: 55.18%
Bob Dutton (R)
Votes: 72,255
Percent: 44.82%
2012 Primary (Top-Two Primary)
Gary Miller (R)
Votes: 16,708
Percent: 26.66%
Bob Dutton (R)
Votes: 15,557
Percent: 24.82%
Pete Aguilar (D)
Votes: 14,181
Percent: 22.63%
Justin Kim (D)
Votes: 8,487
Percent: 13.54%
Renea Wickman (D)
Votes: 4,188
Percent: 6.68%
Rita Ramirez-Dean (D)
Votes: 3,546
Percent: 5.66%
Prior Winning Percentages
2010 (62%), 2008 (60%), 2006 (100%), 2004 (68%), 2002 (68%), 2000 (59%), 1998 (53%)
Gary Miller Votes and Bills
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National Journal’s rating system is an objective method of analyzing voting. The liberal score means that the lawmaker’s votes were more liberal than that percentage of his colleagues’ votes. The conservative score means his votes were more conservative than that percentage of his colleagues’ votes. The composite score is an average of a lawmaker’s six issue-based scores. See all NJ Voting

More Liberal
More Conservative
2013 2012 2011
Economic 41 (L) : 59 (C) 23 (L) : 77 (C) - (L) : 90 (C)
Social 30 (L) : 70 (C) 14 (L) : 85 (C) - (L) : 83 (C)
Foreign 33 (L) : 66 (C) 15 (L) : 85 (C) 25 (L) : 75 (C)
Composite 34.8 (L) : 65.2 (C) 17.5 (L) : 82.5 (C) 12.8 (L) : 87.2 (C)
Interest Group Ratings

The vote ratings by 10 special interest groups provide insight into a lawmaker’s general ideology and the degree to which he or she agrees with the group’s point of view. Two organizations provide just one combined rating for 2011 and 2012, the two sessions of the 112th Congress. They are the ACLU and the ITIC. About the interest groups.

20112012
FRC90100
LCV66
CFG8071
ITIC-92
NTU8274
20112012
COC100-
ACLU-0
ACU9695
ADA00
AFSCME0-
Key House Votes

The key votes show how a member of Congress voted on the major bills of the year. N indicates a "no" vote; Y a "yes" vote. If a member voted "present" or was absent, the bill caption is not shown. For a complete description of the bills included in key votes, see the Almanac's Guide to Usage.

    • Pass GOP budget
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • End fiscal cliff
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Extend payroll tax cut
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Find AG in contempt
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Stop student loan hike
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Repeal health care
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Raise debt limit
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Pass cut, cap, balance
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Defund Planned Parenthood
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Repeal lightbulb ban
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Add endangered listings
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Speed troop withdrawal
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Regulate financial firms
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2010
    • Pass tax cuts for some
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2010
    • Stop detainee transfers
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2010
    • Legalize immigrants' kids
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2010
    • Repeal don't ask, tell
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2010
    • Limit campaign funds
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2010
    • Pass $820 billion stimulus
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Let guns in national parks
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Pass cap-and-trade
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Bar federal abortion funds
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Pass health care bill
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Bail out financial markets
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2008
    • Repeal D.C. gun law
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2008
    • Overhaul FISA
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2008
    • Increase minimum wage
    • Vote:
    • Year: 2007
    • Expand SCHIP
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • Raise CAFE standards
    • Vote:
    • Year: 2007
    • Share immigration data
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
    • Foreign aid abortion ban
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
    • Ban gay bias in workplace
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • Withdraw troops 8/08
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • No operations in Iran
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • Free trade with Peru
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
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The Almanac is a members-only database of searchable profiles compiled and adapted from the Almanac of American Politics. Comprehensive online profiles include biographical and political summaries of elected officials, campaign expenditures, voting records, interest-group ratings, and congressional staff look-ups. In-depth overviews of each state and house district are included as well, along with demographic data, analysis of voting trends, and political histories.
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