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Democrat

Rep. Janice Hahn (D)

Janice Hahn Contact
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Email: n/a
DC Contact Information

Phone: 202-225-8220

Address: 404 CHOB, DC 20515

Websites: hahn.house.gov
State Office Contact Information

Phone: (310) 831-1799

Address: 140 West Sixth Street, San Pedro CA 90731

Wilmington CA

Phone: (310) 549-8282

Fax: (310) 549-8250

Address: 544 North Avalon Boulevard, Wilmington CA 90744

Compton CA

Phone: (310) 605-5520

Fax: (310) 761-1457

Address: 205 South Willowbrook Avenue, Compton CA 90220

South Gate CA

Phone: (323) 563-9562

Address: 8650 California Avenue, South Gate CA 90280

Carson CA

Phone: (310) 830-7600

Address: 701 East Carson Street, Carson CA 90745

Janice Hahn Staff
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Sort by INTEREST NAME TITLE
Odendahl, Elizabeth
Deputy Press Secretary; Legislative Assistant
Vogt, Justin
Legislative Director
Odendahl, Elizabeth
Deputy Press Secretary; Legislative Assistant
Vogt, Justin
Legislative Director
Odendahl, Elizabeth
Deputy Press Secretary; Legislative Assistant
Vogt, Justin
Legislative Director
Vogt, Justin
Legislative Director
Vogt, Justin
Legislative Director
Vogt, Justin
Legislative Director
Vogt, Justin
Legislative Director
Odendahl, Elizabeth
Deputy Press Secretary; Legislative Assistant
Odendahl, Elizabeth
Deputy Press Secretary; Legislative Assistant
Vogt, Justin
Legislative Director
Odendahl, Elizabeth
Deputy Press Secretary; Legislative Assistant
Odendahl, Elizabeth
Deputy Press Secretary; Legislative Assistant
Vogt, Justin
Legislative Director
Vogt, Justin
Legislative Director
Vogt, Justin
Legislative Director
Vogt, Justin
Legislative Director
Vogt, Justin
Legislative Director
Vogt, Justin
Legislative Director
Vogt, Justin
Legislative Director
Vogt, Justin
Legislative Director
Odendahl, Elizabeth
Deputy Press Secretary; Legislative Assistant
Vogt, Justin
Legislative Director
Vogt, Justin
Legislative Director
Vogt, Justin
Legislative Director
Vogt, Justin
Legislative Director
Vogt, Justin
Legislative Director
Vogt, Justin
Legislative Director
Vogt, Justin
Legislative Director
Odendahl, Elizabeth
Deputy Press Secretary; Legislative Assistant
Boyd, Eric
Deputy District Director
Castilla, German
District Staff Assistant
Chambers, Michelle
District Representative
Larramendi, Lara
District Director
Ledesma, Veronica
District Representative
Levin, Michael
Communications Director
McDonald, Annette
District Representative
Odendahl, Elizabeth
Deputy Press Secretary; Legislative Assistant
Saroff, Laurie
Chief of Staff
Sulic, Ivan
District Scheduler
Truong, Amanda
Staff Assistant; Legislative Correspondent
Vogt, Justin
Legislative Director
Saroff, Laurie
Chief of Staff
Levin, Michael
Communications Director
Boyd, Eric
Deputy District Director
Odendahl, Elizabeth
Deputy Press Secretary; Legislative Assistant
Larramendi, Lara
District Director
Odendahl, Elizabeth
Deputy Press Secretary; Legislative Assistant
Truong, Amanda
Staff Assistant; Legislative Correspondent
Vogt, Justin
Legislative Director
Chambers, Michelle
District Representative
Ledesma, Veronica
District Representative
McDonald, Annette
District Representative
Sulic, Ivan
District Scheduler
Castilla, German
District Staff Assistant
Truong, Amanda
Staff Assistant; Legislative Correspondent
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Janice Hahn Committees
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Janice Hahn Biography
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  • Elected: July 2011, 1st full term.
  • District: California 44
  • Born: Mar. 30, 1952, Los Angeles
  • Home: Los Angeles
  • Education:

    Abilene Christian U., B.S. 1974

  • Professional Career:

    Teacher, Good News Academy, 1974-78; Public affairs regional manager, Southern CA Edison Co., 1995-2000.

  • Political Career:

    Charter Reform Commission, 1997-99; L.A. City Cncl., 2001-2011.

  • Ethnicity: White/Caucasian
  • Family: Divorced; 3 children

Democrat Janice Hahn has yet to have an easy election to the House. She won an acrimonious July 2011 special election to take the seat of retiring Rep. Jane Harman, and less than two years later, was pitted against incumbent Rep. Laura Richardson in the newly redrawn 44th District. She won reelection by ousting Richardson, a fellow Democrat. Read More

Democrat Janice Hahn has yet to have an easy election to the House. She won an acrimonious July 2011 special election to take the seat of retiring Rep. Jane Harman, and less than two years later, was pitted against incumbent Rep. Laura Richardson in the newly redrawn 44th District. She won reelection by ousting Richardson, a fellow Democrat.

Hahn’s electoral successes can be attributed to her strong political pedigree. Her father is Kenneth Hahn, who spent 40 years as a Los Angeles County supervisor after serving on L.A.’s City Council. A dominant figure in the city’s Democratic scene, the elder Hahn helped persuade the Brooklyn Dodgers baseball team to relocate to the city in 1958. He also was the only city politician to meet the late civil rights leader Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. at the airport during one of his visits to Los Angeles in the early 1960s, a fact his daughter later used in a campaign ad. Her uncle Gordon Hahn also was a city councilman and served in the California Assembly. And her brother, James Hahn, was Los Angeles mayor from 2001 to 2005 after serving as city attorney. Janice Hahn’s mother, Ramona, also was active in local politics.

Hahn received an education degree from Abilene Christian University in Texas, and taught at a private academy for four years. She later worked a series of other jobs in the private sector, including as a public affairs manager at Southern California Edison and a vice president for Prudential Securities. She made an initial bid for Congress in 1998, waging an unsuccessful campaign against Republican Steven Kuykendall, who won a narrow 49%-47% victory. She spent two years as a member of the Los Angeles Charter Reform Commission before being elected to the City Council in 2000. On the council, she cultivated the support of labor union members as a stalwart supporter of workers’ rights, often opposing layoffs and furloughs for city workers. She also developed a strong pro-environmental record and was known as a tough advocate for her poor constituents.

In 2010, Hahn sought to parlay her experience on the council into California’s lieutenant governorship. She was initially seen as the front-runner, based on the strength of her last name, but San Francisco’s mayor, Gavin Newsom, later entered the race. He proved more charismatic to voters and trounced her in the Democratic primary by more than 20 percentage points.

When Harman, a Democrat, resigned her seat in Congress to head the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, Hahn moved quickly to announce her candidacy. She vowed to work to “create new jobs, expand clean energy technologies, and ensure that local small business owners get the help and opportunities they need to flourish in a global economy.”

In the weeks that followed, Harman reportedly helped line up high-profile endorsements from such figures as Sen. Dianne Feinstein, but her efforts did not deter California Secretary of State Debra Bowen from jumping into the race. The special election became the first test of the state’s new open primary system that allows voters to choose candidates of any political party. The top two finishers then compete for the seat. Bowen had been expected to finish at least well enough to advance to a runoff. But Bowen was unexpectedly nudged aside in the May primary by Republican Craig Huey, a tea party-backed website publisher. He spent $500,000 from his own pocket on a “cut spending, grow jobs” campaign. Hahn finished first with 24.6%, and he finished second with 22.2%, sending the two of them into a general election runoff.

Hahn set the tone for the campaign by running an ad in June highlighting what she termed Huey’s “extremist right-wing agenda” and comparing him with former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin. An outside conservative group, Turn Right USA, tried to help Huey with an inflammatory YouTube video that portrayed Hahn as friendly with gang members. But the ad—which featured a white stripper—sparked accusations of racism and sexism, and Huey himself denounced it. He did, however, distribute a local news report that was based on the charges in the video. He also depicted Hahn as a career politician while playing up his devotion to fiscal austerity.

With tea party activists involved, some Republicans had hopes of knocking off Hahn. But national Republicans largely stayed out of the race, leaving Huey to self-finance much of his campaign. He eventually poured more than $880,000 of his own money into the effort. Hahn, meanwhile, got fundraising help from House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi. She won, 55% to 45%.

Hahn established herself as a reliable Democratic vote and was given a seat on the Homeland Security Committee, where Harman had also served. She got a provision in the House-passed intelligence authorization bill in 2012 to ensure that the coordination and training among spy agencies and local law enforcement agencies does not violate minorities’ constitutional rights. On the Small Business Committee, she introduced a bill in 2012 to make permanent a program within the Small Business Administration to reduce in length the application required for borrowers and streamline the response time for business loans.

When California’s congressional districts were redrawn by an independent commission after the 2010 census, Hahn had to compete with incumbent Richardson in the new 44th District. But Richardson was hurt by revelations about her finances; she was $454,000 in debt, including over $125,000 in legal bills stemming from a House ethics investigation into her staff’s work on both redistricting and personal errands.

Hahn, meanwhile, picked up the support of Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa, helping her make inroads among Latinos, and won the June primary 60%-40% over Richardson, setting up a rematch race for November. Then Richardson’s problems worsened; the House Ethics Committee recommended that she be formally reprimanded and pay a $10,000 fine for improperly using her legislative staff for campaign work and then obstructing the investigation. Hahn defeated Richardson with 60% of the vote.

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Janice Hahn Election Results
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2012 General (Top-Two General)
Janice Hahn (D)
Votes: 99,909
Percent: 60.22%
Laura Richardson (D)
Votes: 65,989
Percent: 39.78%
2012 Primary (Top-Two Primary)
Janice Hahn (D)
Votes: 24,843
Percent: 60.06%
Laura Richardson (D)
Votes: 16,523
Percent: 39.94%
Prior Winning Percentages
2011 special (55%)
Janice Hahn Votes and Bills
Back to top NJ Vote Ratings

National Journal’s rating system is an objective method of analyzing voting. The liberal score means that the lawmaker’s votes were more liberal than that percentage of his colleagues’ votes. The conservative score means his votes were more conservative than that percentage of his colleagues’ votes. The composite score is an average of a lawmaker’s six issue-based scores. See all NJ Voting

More Liberal
More Conservative
2013 2012
Economic 78 (L) : 21 (C) 89 (L) : - (C)
Social 79 (L) : 16 (C) 85 (L) : - (C)
Foreign 90 (L) : 6 (C) 78 (L) : 22 (C)
Composite 84.0 (L) : 16.0 (C) 88.3 (L) : 11.7 (C)
Interest Group Ratings

The vote ratings by 10 special interest groups provide insight into a lawmaker’s general ideology and the degree to which he or she agrees with the group’s point of view. Two organizations provide just one combined rating for 2011 and 2012, the two sessions of the 112th Congress. They are the ACLU and the ITIC. About the interest groups.

20112012
FRC-0
LCV10086
CFG-12
ITIC-45
NTU-15
20112012
COC11-
ACLU-38
ACU-0
ADA-95
AFSCME100-
Key House Votes

The key votes show how a member of Congress voted on the major bills of the year. N indicates a "no" vote; Y a "yes" vote. If a member voted "present" or was absent, the bill caption is not shown. For a complete description of the bills included in key votes, see the Almanac's Guide to Usage.

    • Pass GOP budget
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • End fiscal cliff
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Extend payroll tax cut
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Stop student loan hike
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • Repeal health care
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • Raise debt limit
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Pass cut, cap, balance
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Add endangered listings
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
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The Almanac is a members-only database of searchable profiles compiled and adapted from the Almanac of American Politics. Comprehensive online profiles include biographical and political summaries of elected officials, campaign expenditures, voting records, interest-group ratings, and congressional staff look-ups. In-depth overviews of each state and house district are included as well, along with demographic data, analysis of voting trends, and political histories.
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