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Republican

Rep. John Mica (R)

John Mica Contact
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Email: n/a
DC Contact Information

Phone: 202-225-4035

Address: 2187 RHOB, DC 20515

Websites: mica.house.gov
State Office Contact Information

Phone: (407) 657-8080

Address: 100 East Sybelia Avenue, Maitland FL 32751-4700

Deltona FL

Phone: (386) 860-1499

Fax: (386) 860-5730

Address: 840 Deltona Boulevard, Deltona FL 32725-7162

Oviedo FL

Phone: (407) 366-0833

Fax: (407) 366-0839

Address: 95 East Mitchell Hammock Road, Oviedo FL 32765

John Mica Staff
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Sort by INTEREST NAME TITLE
Rockas, James
Legislative Correspondent; Press Assistant
Rockas, James
Legislative Correspondent; Press Assistant
Stone, Kevan
Special Projects Director
Stone, Kevan
Special Projects Director
Stone, Kevan
Special Projects Director
Stone, Kevan
Special Projects Director
McMaster, Sean
Deputy Chief of Staff
Stone, Kevan
Special Projects Director
Rockas, James
Legislative Correspondent; Press Assistant
Mines, Janet
Constituent Services Manager
Stone, Kevan
Special Projects Director
Rockas, James
Legislative Correspondent; Press Assistant
Waldrip, Brian
Legislative Director; Communications Director
Stone, Kevan
Special Projects Director
Stone, Kevan
Special Projects Director
Waldrip, Brian
Legislative Director; Communications Director
Rockas, James
Legislative Correspondent; Press Assistant
Stone, Kevan
Special Projects Director
McMaster, Sean
Deputy Chief of Staff
McMaster, Sean
Deputy Chief of Staff
Stone, Kevan
Special Projects Director
Stone, Kevan
Special Projects Director
Waldrip, Brian
Legislative Director; Communications Director
McMaster, Sean
Deputy Chief of Staff
Stone, Kevan
Special Projects Director
Stone, Kevan
Special Projects Director
Rockas, James
Legislative Correspondent; Press Assistant
Rockas, James
Legislative Correspondent; Press Assistant
Mines, Janet
Constituent Services Manager
Mines, Janet
Constituent Services Manager
Mines, Janet
Constituent Services Manager
Stone, Kevan
Special Projects Director
McMaster, Sean
Deputy Chief of Staff
Stone, Kevan
Special Projects Director
Stone, Kevan
Special Projects Director
Rockas, James
Legislative Correspondent; Press Assistant
Waldrip, Brian
Legislative Director; Communications Director
Rockas, James
Legislative Correspondent; Press Assistant
Stone, Kevan
Special Projects Director
Mines, Janet
Constituent Services Manager
Rockas, James
Legislative Correspondent; Press Assistant
Stone, Kevan
Special Projects Director
Waldrip, Brian
Legislative Director; Communications Director
McMaster, Sean
Deputy Chief of Staff
Waldrip, Brian
Legislative Director; Communications Director
Stone, Kevan
Special Projects Director
Mines, Janet
Constituent Services Manager
Byrd, Alan
Florida Press Director
Cotton, Barry
District Representative
Deck, Wiley
Chief of Staff
Kelly, Patrick
District Representative
McMaster, Sean
Deputy Chief of Staff
Mines, Janet
Constituent Services Manager
Neuhaus, Chelsey
Executive Assistant
O'Shaughnessy, Leslie
District Representative
Rockas, James
Legislative Correspondent; Press Assistant
Stone, Kevan
Special Projects Director
Tait, Tanice
Office Manager
Waldrip, Brian
Legislative Director; Communications Director
Deck, Wiley
Chief of Staff
Waldrip, Brian
Legislative Director; Communications Director
McMaster, Sean
Deputy Chief of Staff
Byrd, Alan
Florida Press Director
Stone, Kevan
Special Projects Director
Neuhaus, Chelsey
Executive Assistant
Rockas, James
Legislative Correspondent; Press Assistant
Waldrip, Brian
Legislative Director; Communications Director
Mines, Janet
Constituent Services Manager
Tait, Tanice
Office Manager
Rockas, James
Legislative Correspondent; Press Assistant
Cotton, Barry
District Representative
Kelly, Patrick
District Representative
O'Shaughnessy, Leslie
District Representative
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John Mica Committees
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John Mica Biography
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  • Elected: 1992, 11th term.
  • District: Florida 7
  • Born: Jan. 27, 1943, Binghamton, NY
  • Home: Winter Park
  • Education:

    Miami-Dade Commun. Col., A.A. 1965, U. of FL, B.A. 1967

  • Professional Career:

    Exec. dir., Palm Beach & Orange Cnty. Govt. Charter Study Commissions, 1970–74; Pres., MK Development, 1975–92; A.A., U.S. Sen. Paula Hawkins, 1981–85; Partner, Mica, Dudinsky & Assoc., 1985–92.

  • Political Career:

    FL House of Reps., 1976–80.

  • Ethnicity: White/Caucasian
  • Religion:

    Episcopalian

  • Family: Married (Patricia); 2 children

John Mica, a Republican first elected in 1992, is a colorful conservative who is unafraid of confrontation. He had a difficult tenure as chairman of the Transportation and Infrastructure Committee in the 112th Congress (2011-12), engaging the Obama administration in a battle that led to a partial shutdown of the Federal Aviation Administration, and then failing to persuade House Republican leaders to spend extra money on a major surface transportation bill. He unsuccessfully sought a waiver from term limits to continue as chairman. Read More

John Mica, a Republican first elected in 1992, is a colorful conservative who is unafraid of confrontation. He had a difficult tenure as chairman of the Transportation and Infrastructure Committee in the 112th Congress (2011-12), engaging the Obama administration in a battle that led to a partial shutdown of the Federal Aviation Administration, and then failing to persuade House Republican leaders to spend extra money on a major surface transportation bill. He unsuccessfully sought a waiver from term limits to continue as chairman.

Mica (MY-kah) grew up in south Florida, in a bipartisan political family originally from upstate New York. His younger brother, Dan Mica, was a Democratic congressman from Palm Beach County from 1978 to 1988, when he lost a primary for the U.S. Senate, and another brother, David Mica, worked for Democratic Gov. Lawton Chiles. John Mica made a small fortune in real estate by developing the New Smyrna beachfront. He was elected to the state House in 1976 and served four years. He worked on the staff of U.S. Sen. Paula Hawkins, a Republican, from 1981 to 1985, and then became a lobbyist. He ran for the U.S. House when the district was created after the 1990 census. In the GOP primary, his opponents attacked him as an insider representing special interests, to which Mica responded, “Some of the finest folks I’ve met are lobbyists.” (His daughter D’Anne eventually became one, taking over as director of government and political affairs at the National Ocean Industries Association in 2011.) He still managed to win the primary 53%-34%. In the general election, against a liberal Democrat, he won 56%-44%.

Mica has been a consistent conservative but also a brash reformer. After taking office, he led the charge to abolish House select committees and to make public the names of lawmakers who sign petitions to bring bills to the floor for a vote over the objections of congressional leaders. In 1995, Mica became chairman of Government Reform’s Civil Service Subcommittee, and in that role helped pass the White House Accountability Act of 1996, imposing on the White House the laws that are imposed on the private sector. He was also the only House member from Florida who voted to lift the moratorium on oil drilling off the coasts of his state. Mica’s chief legislative front has been at Transportation and Infrastructure, where he has long advocated for greater private-sector investment in transportation. He has been a passionate critic of Amtrak and the Transportation Security Administration, the latter of which he has described as a “Soviet-style bureaucracy.”

In 2011, Mica turned his attention to the Federal Aviation Administration. The Obama administration and labor groups reacted angrily to a provision in the agency’s authorization bill making it harder for unions to become certified as official representatives of aviation and rail workers. Then, in what he called “a tool to try to motivate some action” on the labor issue, Mica attached a provision to a routine FAA funding bill that would cut subsidies for airline service to 13 rural airports, including one in Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid’s home state of Nevada and another in Democrat Jay Rockefeller’s home state of West Virginia. The resulting standoff led to a nearly two-week shutdown of the agency, furloughing thousands of federal employees and bringing construction projects to a halt. Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood used waivers to avoid Mica’s rural airport cuts. A chastened Mica told The Washington Post he was stunned at the vehemence of the Democrats’ counterattack. “Quite honestly, we did not expect that,” he said.

Mica then prepared for the upcoming six-year surface transportation reauthorization bill that is the committee’s main focus. He wrote an opinion article in May 2011 predicting the measure would go beyond highways and transit programs to make “significant reforms” in rail and maritime programs that he said were not performing well. But House Democrats accused him of shutting them out of talks, and he wrangled with Democratic Sen. Barbara Boxer, the temperamental chairwoman of the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee. Despite his best efforts, House members were unable to agree on a bill, which left the chamber at loose ends when it came to negotiations with the Senate over its measure, which had higher spending levels. The two chambers managed to reach agreement in 2012 on a two-year bill, a time period Mica had earlier criticized as being insufficient.

Mica was term-limited in the chairman’s job under House Republican rules, but he sought a waiver similar to one that was granted in November 2012 to Paul Ryan, R-Wis., to continue to chair the Budget Committee. But Mica dropped his bid when it became clear the GOP leadership would not approve it, and he publicly supported Pennsylvania Republican Bill Shuster, whose father Bud Shuster once led the panel. Mica, in a December 2012 interview with National Journal, reflected on how the days in which the elder Shuster ruled with an iron fist had long since passed. “They’re all difficult lifts,” he said of the chairman’s role in crafting bills. He said he hoped to take over the chairmanship of the Oversight and Government Reform Committee in 2015.

Mica previously had worked to build more airplane runways across the nation and to improve security in the post-September 11 era. When the Senate passed a bill that federalized airport screeners, Mica and other House Republicans sought to preserve some role for the private sector. They reached a deal to allow airports to opt out of the federal system after three years if they met certain standards. A few months later, Mica introduced a bill to permit commercial airline pilots to carry guns in the cockpit. The bill was initially opposed by the Bush administration and the Senate, and airlines worried about the risks. But the House voted 310-113 to allow pilots to carry guns. The Senate agreed 87-6, and President George W. Bush bowed to popular will. On local transportation issues, Mica waged a long fight for mass transit in the traffic-clogged Orlando area and ultimately secured a pledge from federal officials of $300 million for a commuter rail project in central Florida. “You can only pave over so much of central Florida,” he said.

Mica has also engaged in some sharp criticism of the Obama administration. In 2010, he pinned the safety failure of the BP oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico on the administration. “I’m not going to point fingers at BP, the private industry, when it’s the government’s responsibility to set standards to do the inspections,” he said. The same year, he blasted Obama’s call for investing $50 billion in infrastructure projects, saying it was no substitute for not enacting a full, six-year transportation bill.

In 2002, Mica faced a serious challenge at home from Democrat Wayne Hogan, a Jacksonville trial lawyer who spent $4.4 million of his own money on his campaign. Hogan, part of the legal team that won Florida’s settlement with the tobacco industry, said he would fight for “ordinary families against powerful interests.” Mica responded that Hogan was trying to buy the seat and that his pledge not to take contributions from political action committees was like “Rockefeller saying he won’t take food stamps.” Mica won comfortably, 60%-40%, carrying all six counties. Since then, he has not been seriously challenged.

Redistricting in 2012 forced Mica into a member-on-member primary against Rep. Sandy Adams, a Republican freshman, but Mica had more money and won easily. He then prevailed with 59% against Democrat Jason Kendall in the general election.

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John Mica Election Results
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2012 General
John Mica (R)
Votes: 185,518
Percent: 58.71%
Jason Kendall (D)
Votes: 130,479
Percent: 41.29%
2012 Primary
John Mica (R)
Votes: 32,119
Percent: 61.15%
Sandra Adams (R)
Votes: 20,404
Percent: 38.85%
Prior Winning Percentages
2010 (69%), 2008 (62%), 2006 (63%), 2004 (100%), 2002 (60%), 2000 (63%), 1998 (100%), 1996 (62%), 1994 (73%), 1992 (56%)
John Mica Votes and Bills
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National Journal’s rating system is an objective method of analyzing voting. The liberal score means that the lawmaker’s votes were more liberal than that percentage of his colleagues’ votes. The conservative score means his votes were more conservative than that percentage of his colleagues’ votes. The composite score is an average of a lawmaker’s six issue-based scores. See all NJ Voting

More Liberal
More Conservative
2013 2012 2011
Economic 10 (L) : 88 (C) 15 (L) : 81 (C) 10 (L) : 83 (C)
Social 13 (L) : 84 (C) 9 (L) : 86 (C) 27 (L) : 71 (C)
Foreign 48 (L) : 51 (C) 30 (L) : 66 (C) 9 (L) : 86 (C)
Composite 24.7 (L) : 75.3 (C) 20.2 (L) : 79.8 (C) 17.7 (L) : 82.3 (C)
Interest Group Ratings

The vote ratings by 10 special interest groups provide insight into a lawmaker’s general ideology and the degree to which he or she agrees with the group’s point of view. Two organizations provide just one combined rating for 2011 and 2012, the two sessions of the 112th Congress. They are the ACLU and the ITIC. About the interest groups.

20112012
FRC80100
LCV116
CFG6577
ITIC-83
NTU7878
20112012
COC100-
ACLU-0
ACU8392
ADA00
AFSCME0-
Key House Votes

The key votes show how a member of Congress voted on the major bills of the year. N indicates a "no" vote; Y a "yes" vote. If a member voted "present" or was absent, the bill caption is not shown. For a complete description of the bills included in key votes, see the Almanac's Guide to Usage.

    • Pass GOP budget
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • End fiscal cliff
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • Extend payroll tax cut
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • Find AG in contempt
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Stop student loan hike
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Repeal health care
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Raise debt limit
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Pass cut, cap, balance
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Defund Planned Parenthood
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Repeal lightbulb ban
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Add endangered listings
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Speed troop withdrawal
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Regulate financial firms
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2010
    • Pass tax cuts for some
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2010
    • Stop detainee transfers
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2010
    • Legalize immigrants' kids
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2010
    • Repeal don't ask, tell
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2010
    • Limit campaign funds
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2010
    • Overturn Ledbetter
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Pass $820 billion stimulus
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Let guns in national parks
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Pass cap-and-trade
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Bar federal abortion funds
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Pass health care bill
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Bail out financial markets
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2008
    • Repeal D.C. gun law
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2008
    • Overhaul FISA
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2008
    • Increase minimum wage
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • Expand SCHIP
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • Raise CAFE standards
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • Share immigration data
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
    • Foreign aid abortion ban
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
    • Ban gay bias in workplace
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • Withdraw troops 8/08
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • No operations in Iran
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • Free trade with Peru
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
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The Almanac is a members-only database of searchable profiles compiled and adapted from the Almanac of American Politics. Comprehensive online profiles include biographical and political summaries of elected officials, campaign expenditures, voting records, interest-group ratings, and congressional staff look-ups. In-depth overviews of each state and house district are included as well, along with demographic data, analysis of voting trends, and political histories.
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