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Democrat

Rep. Mike McIntyre (D)

Mike McIntyre Contact
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Email: n/a
DC Contact Information

Phone: 202-225-2731

Address: 2428 RHOB, DC 20515

Mike McIntyre Biography
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  • Elected: 1996, 9th term.
  • District: North Carolina 7
  • Born: Aug. 06, 1956, Lumberton
  • Home: Lumberton
  • Education:

    U. of NC, B.A. 1978, J.D. 1981

  • Professional Career:

    Practicing atty., 1981–96.

  • Religion:

    Presbyterian

  • Family: Married (Dee); 2 children

Democrat Mike McIntyre, first elected in 1996, is—like the other few remaining white members of his party from the South—a centrist and particularly conservative on cultural issues. And like other white Southern Democrats, he has endured some extremely close reelection fights. Read More

Democrat Mike McIntyre, first elected in 1996, is—like the other few remaining white members of his party from the South—a centrist and particularly conservative on cultural issues. And like other white Southern Democrats, he has endured some extremely close reelection fights.

McIntyre grew up in Lumberton, in Robeson County, graduated from college and law school at Chapel Hill, and practiced law in Lumberton, where his family has been prominent for 200 years. As an intern for Democratic Rep. Charlie Rose, he witnessed the Watergate hearings and President Richard Nixon’s resignation speech. Afterward, he told his father that he would like to run for Rose’s seat someday. McIntyre finally got that chance in 1995, when Rose decided to retire.

McIntyre’s chief opposition in the primary was Rose Marie Lowry-Townsend, a Lumbee and a liberal who had support from the National Education Association, labor unions, and national women’s groups. Lowry-Townsend led McIntyre 30%-23% in the primary. In the runoff campaign, McIntyre called for smaller government, cited his close ties to the district, and got a boost from the endorsements of local African-American leaders. He won 52%-48%. In the general election, McIntyre’s platform was almost as conservative as that of his Republican opponent, New Hanover County Commissioner Bill Caster. But McIntyre won 53%-46%.

McIntyre is a member of the fiscally conservative Blue Dog Democrats. Although he has shown a bit more loyalty to his party in recent years, he remains one of the House Democrats most likely to break ranks. He cast his vote for minority leader in 2013 for fellow Blue Dog Jim Cooper, D-Tenn., over liberal Nancy Pelosi of California; two years earlier, he supported fellow North Carolina Democrat Heath Shuler over Pelosi. He also refused to endorse President Barack Obama’s reelection bid. He was one of five House Democrats in July 2012 to join Republicans in voting to repeal the health care law, and one of 16 who supported a GOP amendment in May to bar the use of any funds that would violate the Defense of Marriage Act, which defines marriage as a union between a man and a woman.

McIntyre came out against most of his party’s major initiatives when it was in the majority, including the health care overhaul and the cap-and-trade bill to reduce greenhouse-gas emissions, both of which he said would result in lost jobs. He also voted against repealing the military’s “don’t ask, don’t tell” policy barring openly gay service members and the DREAM Act giving some children of illegal immigrants a potential path to citizenship. McIntyre did support Obama’s 2009 economic stimulus law, calling it essential to create jobs. And he has supported affirmative action and opposed government vouchers for private school tuition. He introduced a bill in 2013 to have the U.S. withdraw from the North American Free Trade Agreement, and he sought to impose a higher tariff on new imports of Caribbean Basin footwear. Converse’s plant west of Lumberton was once the country’s largest shoe factory.

In 2011, McIntyre became the ranking Democrat on Armed Services’ seapower subcommittee, where he has worked on bolstering the Navy’s fleet and air operations. McIntyre voted to authorize the use of force in Iraq in 2002, but he later criticized the Bush administration for its post-victory planning.

McIntyre did not face a serious challenge until 2010. His Republican opponent, Ilario Pantano, was a Marine veteran of the Gulf and Iraq wars who won national attention for his book, Warlord: No Better Friend, No Worse Enemy, about his experience being charged in 2005 with the premeditated murder of two Iraqi prisoners. The case never went to a court martial for lack of evidence. Pantano campaigned as “a hard-core national security hawk,” and was backed by tea party groups and the National Republican Congressional Committee. McIntyre touted his endorsements from the National Rifle Association and National Right to Life Committee, and he won, 54%-46%.

With North Carolina’s legislature in GOP hands, McIntyre was a focus of redistricting after the 2010 census. In addition to making the district more Republican friendly, the map-makers carved McIntyre’s home base of Lumberton out of the district. He was challenged by state Sen. David Rouzer, and outside groups poured in more than $4 million on his behalf. But Rouzer, who had once worked in Washington, D.C., proved highly vulnerable to Democratic attacks that he was an out-of-touch lobbyist who supported outsourcing. The two were in a dead heat on Election Night, prompting a vote-counting effort that stretched for three weeks until Rouzer conceded. McIntyre won by 654 votes out of more than 336,000 cast.

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Mike McIntyre Election Results
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2012 General
Mike McIntyre (D)
Votes: 168,695
Percent: 50.1%
David Rouzer (R)
Votes: 168,041
Percent: 49.9%
2012 Primary
Mike McIntyre (D)
Unopposed
Prior Winning Percentages
2010 (54%), 2008 (69%), 2006 (73%), 2004 (73%), 2002 (71%), 2000 (70%), 1998 (91%), 1996 (53%)
Mike McIntyre Votes and Bills
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National Journal’s rating system is an objective method of analyzing voting. The liberal score means that the lawmaker’s votes were more liberal than that percentage of his colleagues’ votes. The conservative score means his votes were more conservative than that percentage of his colleagues’ votes. The composite score is an average of a lawmaker’s six issue-based scores. See all NJ Voting

More Liberal
More Conservative
2013 2012 2011
Economic 55 (L) : 45 (C) 55 (L) : 45 (C) 57 (L) : 43 (C)
Social 54 (L) : 46 (C) 57 (L) : 43 (C) 56 (L) : 44 (C)
Foreign 53 (L) : 46 (C) 56 (L) : 44 (C) 55 (L) : 44 (C)
Composite 54.2 (L) : 45.8 (C) 56.0 (L) : 44.0 (C) 56.2 (L) : 43.8 (C)
Interest Group Ratings

The vote ratings by 10 special interest groups provide insight into a lawmaker’s general ideology and the degree to which he or she agrees with the group’s point of view. Two organizations provide just one combined rating for 2011 and 2012, the two sessions of the 112th Congress. They are the ACLU and the ITIC. About the interest groups.

20112012
FRC9083
LCV5426
CFG3463
ITIC-58
NTU4348
20112012
COC75-
ACLU-15
ACU4060
ADA4010
AFSCME29-
Key House Votes

The key votes show how a member of Congress voted on the major bills of the year. N indicates a "no" vote; Y a "yes" vote. If a member voted "present" or was absent, the bill caption is not shown. For a complete description of the bills included in key votes, see the Almanac's Guide to Usage.

    • Pass GOP budget
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • End fiscal cliff
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • Extend payroll tax cut
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Find AG in contempt
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Stop student loan hike
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Repeal health care
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Raise debt limit
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Pass cut, cap, balance
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Defund Planned Parenthood
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Repeal lightbulb ban
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Add endangered listings
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Speed troop withdrawal
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Regulate financial firms
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2010
    • Pass tax cuts for some
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2010
    • Stop detainee transfers
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2010
    • Legalize immigrants' kids
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2010
    • Repeal don't ask, tell
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2010
    • Limit campaign funds
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2010
    • Overturn Ledbetter
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Pass $820 billion stimulus
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Let guns in national parks
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Pass cap-and-trade
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Bar federal abortion funds
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Pass health care bill
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Bail out financial markets
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2008
    • Repeal D.C. gun law
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2008
    • Overhaul FISA
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2008
    • Increase minimum wage
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
    • Expand SCHIP
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • Raise CAFE standards
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
    • Share immigration data
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
    • Foreign aid abortion ban
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
    • Ban gay bias in workplace
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • Withdraw troops 8/08
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
    • No operations in Iran
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
    • Free trade with Peru
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
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The Almanac is a members-only database of searchable profiles compiled and adapted from the Almanac of American Politics. Comprehensive online profiles include biographical and political summaries of elected officials, campaign expenditures, voting records, interest-group ratings, and congressional staff look-ups. In-depth overviews of each state and house district are included as well, along with demographic data, analysis of voting trends, and political histories.
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