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Republican

Rep. Doug Lamborn (R)

Doug Lamborn Contact
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Email: n/a
DC Contact Information

Phone: 202-225-4422

Address: 2402 RHOB, DC 20515

State Office Contact Information

Phone: (719) 520-0055

Address: 1125 Kelly Johnson Boulevard, Colorado Springs CO 80920-3965

Buena Vista CO

Phone: (719) 520-0055

Fax: (719) 520-0840

Address: 415 Main Street, Buena Vista CO 81211-8106

Doug Lamborn Staff
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Miller, Brandon
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Johnson, Justin
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Miller, Brandon
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Miller, Brandon
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Miller, Brandon
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Miller, Brandon
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Miller, Brandon
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Colburn, Lee
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Johnson, Justin
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Wolf, R.J.
Veterans Fellowship Caucus Fellow
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Doug Lamborn Committees
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Doug Lamborn Biography
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  • Elected: 2006, 4th term.
  • District: Colorado 5
  • Born: May. 24, 1954, Leavenworth, KS
  • Home: Colorado Springs
  • Education:

    U. of KS, B.S. 1978, J.D. 1986

  • Professional Career:

    Practicing atty., 1987-2007.

  • Political Career:

    CO House, 1994-98; CO Senate, 1998-2006.

  • Ethnicity: White/Caucasian
  • Religion:

    Christian

  • Family: Married (Jeanie); 5 children

The congressman from the 5th District is Doug Lamborn, a conservative, tea party Republican first elected in 2006 and one of the party’s fiercest partisans in the House. Read More

The congressman from the 5th District is Doug Lamborn, a conservative, tea party Republican first elected in 2006 and one of the party’s fiercest partisans in the House.

The son of a prison guard, Lamborn was born in Leavenworth, Kansas. He studied journalism at the University of Kansas and ultimately earned a law degree. He said he voted in 1976 for Jimmy Carter, but was then drawn to the Republican politics of Ronald Reagan in the 1980s. In 1987, Lamborn moved his family to Colorado Springs, where he practiced business and real estate law and became an avid mountain climber. In 1994, he won the first of two terms in the Colorado House and, in 1998, was appointed to a vacant state Senate seat. Lamborn ran unopposed in the next election and later served as state Senate president pro tem. During 12 years in the legislature, Lamborn compiled a reliably conservative record on social and fiscal issues. He opposed abortion rights, sponsoring bills to limit late-term abortions, and advocated tax cuts, including a reduction in state income taxes. He backed legislation that would have ended some benefits to illegal immigrants and increased penalties for illegal immigrant smugglers.

When Republican U.S. Rep. Joel Hefley retired, Lamborn ran for his seat. In the primary, Hefley endorsed Jeff Crank, his former aide. Lamborn had the backing of the anti-tax Club for Growth and the Colorado Christian Coalition. At the May GOP party convention, Crank won the delegate vote 46%-40%, but Lamborn had more than the minimum 30% needed to secure a place on the primary ballot. Lamborn emphasized his conservative voting record and vowed never to raise taxes. The state Christian Coalition sent a mailer suggesting Crank backed the “radical homosexual lobby.” In the August primary, Crank won five of the district’s six counties and appeared headed to victory. But once absentee ballots were counted, the results flipped and Lamborn won by 892 votes, defeating Crank 27%-25%.

In the general election, Lamborn faced Democrat Jay Fawcett, an Air Force Academy graduate who won a Bronze star during the Persian Gulf War. In most years, the Democratic nominee would not have drawn a second look; no Democrat had won the seat since it was created in 1972. But the bruising Republican primary and a tough national environment for Republicans made for an unusually competitive general election. Hefley accused Lamborn of running a “sleazy” primary campaign and refused to endorse him. Fawcett sought to take advantage of the Republican discord, purchasing a newspaper ad featuring the names and photos of three dozen prominent local Republicans who also declined to endorse Lamborn. He tried to appeal to Republicans and unaffiliated voters by emphasizing his military experience, a strong selling point in the military-oriented district. In October, polls showed a dead heat, an alarming result for a district that national Republicans were unaccustomed to worrying about. But on Election Day, voters overcame lingering animosity toward Lamborn and gave him a 60%-40% victory.

In the House, Lamborn established a record as one of his party’s most conservative members. He was an original member of the Tea Party Caucus and in the 2010 race for Colorado governor endorsed former Rep. Tom Tancredo, known for his incendiary opposition to immigration. Lamborn tried, but lost overwhelmingly, to pass amendments to eliminate funding for the National Endowment for the Arts and the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, two government-sponsored entities that conservatives consider too liberal. He also sponsored a bill to bar federal funds to schools that provide access to emergency contraception services. On defense issues, Lamborn led an effort to gather support for Mosab Hassan Yousef, the son of a founder of the terrorist group Hamas who converted to Christianity and became an anti-Hamas informer. He had been threatened with deportation from the United States but was granted political asylum in 2010.

Although Lamborn is fond of cuts in government spending—he bucked Republican House Speaker John Boehner during the 2011 debt and budget talks because he wanted the Democratic White House to agree to deeper cuts—he’s enthusiastic about government spending in his own district. In 2009, he led Colorado’s House delegation in adding earmarks to spending bills, particularly military-related projects, according to the watchdog group Citizens Against Government Waste.

In June 2011, Lamborn was criticized back home for pushing to revoke funding for the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colo. Lamborn had signed onto a letter with eight other members of Congress asking to stop funding Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy grants, which include money for the laboratory in Golden. A group of Jefferson County Republicans wrote to Lamborn asking him to reconsider and to visit the lab. Lamborn later explained to The Denver Post that he did not know that the program he was targeting included money for the Golden-based lab. “I personally am not seeking any reduction (of) jobs at NREL,” he told the newspaper. “The bigger issue is, what is the government’s role in renewable energy? There are some pitfalls we need to avoid.”

Lamborn stepped into an even bigger morass during an interview with a Denver radio station in July 2011. Discussing President Barack Obama’s budget policies, Lamborn said, “I don’t even want to have to be associated with (Obama). It’s like touching a tar baby.” His use of the phrase “tar baby,” which has a double meaning as a racial slur, brought condemnation from the NAACP and other civil rights groups. Activists with the liberal group MoveOn.org protested at Lamborn’s district office. He quickly apologized to Obama and later also apologized to a group of black leaders at a Baptist church in Fountain, Colo.

But a few months later, Lamborn was back in partisan form: In January 2012, he took the step—rare for a member of Congress—of boycotting Obama’s State of the Union address because, he said, he “believes the president is in full campaign mode and will use the address as an opportunity to bash his political opponents.”

Back home, lingering resentment over the 2006 primary led to a rematch with Crank in 2008. The challenger attacked Lamborn’s job performance, but this time, Lamborn won 44% to 30%. He won easily in November against token Democratic opposition, and he won his subsequent two reelections with ease as well.

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Doug Lamborn Election Results
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2012 General
Douglas Lamborn (R)
Votes: 199,639
Percent: 64.98%
Dave Anderson (I)
Votes: 53,318
Percent: 17.35%
Jim Pirtle (Lib)
Votes: 22,778
Percent: 7.41%
Misha Luzov (Green)
Votes: 18,284
Percent: 5.95%
Kenneth Harvell (CNP)
Votes: 13,212
Percent: 4.3%
2012 Primary
Douglas Lamborn (R)
Votes: 43,929
Percent: 61.72%
Robert Blaha (R)
Votes: 27,245
Percent: 38.28%
Prior Winning Percentages
2010 (66%), 2008 (60%), 2006 (60%)
Doug Lamborn Votes and Bills
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National Journal’s rating system is an objective method of analyzing voting. The liberal score means that the lawmaker’s votes were more liberal than that percentage of his colleagues’ votes. The conservative score means his votes were more conservative than that percentage of his colleagues’ votes. The composite score is an average of a lawmaker’s six issue-based scores. See all NJ Voting

More Liberal
More Conservative
2013 2012 2011
Economic 6 (L) : 94 (C) 10 (L) : 89 (C) - (L) : 90 (C)
Social 13 (L) : 84 (C) 21 (L) : 75 (C) - (L) : 83 (C)
Foreign 44 (L) : 54 (C) - (L) : 91 (C) - (L) : 91 (C)
Composite 21.8 (L) : 78.2 (C) 12.7 (L) : 87.3 (C) 6.0 (L) : 94.0 (C)
Interest Group Ratings

The vote ratings by 10 special interest groups provide insight into a lawmaker’s general ideology and the degree to which he or she agrees with the group’s point of view. Two organizations provide just one combined rating for 2011 and 2012, the two sessions of the 112th Congress. They are the ACLU and the ITIC. About the interest groups.

20112012
FRC100100
LCV96
CFG10097
ITIC-67
NTU8585
20112012
COC88-
ACLU-0
ACU10096
ADA05
AFSCME0-
Key House Votes

The key votes show how a member of Congress voted on the major bills of the year. N indicates a "no" vote; Y a "yes" vote. If a member voted "present" or was absent, the bill caption is not shown. For a complete description of the bills included in key votes, see the Almanac's Guide to Usage.

    • Pass GOP budget
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • End fiscal cliff
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • Extend payroll tax cut
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • Find AG in contempt
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Stop student loan hike
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • Repeal health care
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Raise debt limit
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Pass cut, cap, balance
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Defund Planned Parenthood
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Repeal lightbulb ban
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Add endangered listings
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Speed troop withdrawal
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Regulate financial firms
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2010
    • Pass tax cuts for some
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2010
    • Stop detainee transfers
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2010
    • Legalize immigrants' kids
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2010
    • Repeal don't ask, tell
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2010
    • Limit campaign funds
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2010
    • Overturn Ledbetter
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Pass $820 billion stimulus
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Let guns in national parks
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Pass cap-and-trade
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Bar federal abortion funds
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Pass health care bill
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Bail out financial markets
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2008
    • Repeal D.C. gun law
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2008
    • Overhaul FISA
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2008
    • Increase minimum wage
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • Expand SCHIP
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • Raise CAFE standards
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • Share immigration data
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
    • Foreign aid abortion ban
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
    • Ban gay bias in workplace
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • Withdraw troops 8/08
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • No operations in Iran
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • Free trade with Peru
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
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The Almanac is a members-only database of searchable profiles compiled and adapted from the Almanac of American Politics. Comprehensive online profiles include biographical and political summaries of elected officials, campaign expenditures, voting records, interest-group ratings, and congressional staff look-ups. In-depth overviews of each state and house district are included as well, along with demographic data, analysis of voting trends, and political histories.
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