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Democrat

Rep. Marcy Kaptur (D)

Marcy Kaptur Contact
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DC Contact Information

Phone: 202-225-4146

Address: 2186 RHOB, DC 20515

State Office Contact Information

Phone: (419) 259-7500

Address: One Maritime Plaza, Toledo OH 43604

Lorain OH

Phone: (440) 288-1500

Address: 200 West Erie, Lorain OH 44052

Lakewood OH

Phone: (216) 767-5933

Address: 16024 Madison Street, Lakewood OH 44107

Parma OH

Phone: (440) 799-8499

Address: 5592 Broadview Road, Parma OH 44134

Marcy Kaptur Staff
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Steyer, Ryan
Senior Policy Advisor
Jarus, Allison
Legislative Assistant
Pruitt, Kobie
Legislative Assistant
Jarus, Allison
Legislative Assistant
Jarus, Allison
Legislative Assistant
Pruitt, Kobie
Legislative Assistant
Perrino, Jenny
Legislative Director
Steyer, Ryan
Senior Policy Advisor
Pruitt, Kobie
Legislative Assistant
Perrino, Jenny
Legislative Director
Pruitt, Kobie
Legislative Assistant
Pruitt, Kobie
Legislative Assistant
Pruitt, Kobie
Legislative Assistant
Steyer, Ryan
Senior Policy Advisor
Perrino, Jenny
Legislative Director
Pruitt, Kobie
Legislative Assistant
Pruitt, Kobie
Legislative Assistant
Smith, Jacob
Staff Assistant
Steyer, Ryan
Senior Policy Advisor
Perrino, Jenny
Legislative Director
Pruitt, Kobie
Legislative Assistant
Jarus, Allison
Legislative Assistant
Perrino, Jenny
Legislative Director
Pruitt, Kobie
Legislative Assistant
Perrino, Jenny
Legislative Director
Steyer, Ryan
Senior Policy Advisor
Steyer, Ryan
Senior Policy Advisor
Perrino, Jenny
Legislative Director
Perrino, Jenny
Legislative Director
Pruitt, Kobie
Legislative Assistant
Pruitt, Kobie
Legislative Assistant
Jarus, Allison
Legislative Assistant
Pruitt, Kobie
Legislative Assistant
Pruitt, Kobie
Legislative Assistant
Pruitt, Kobie
Legislative Assistant
Jarus, Allison
Legislative Assistant
Perrino, Jenny
Legislative Director
Perrino, Jenny
Legislative Director
Pruitt, Kobie
Legislative Assistant
Pruitt, Kobie
Legislative Assistant
Jarus, Allison
Legislative Assistant
Perrino, Jenny
Legislative Director
Perrino, Jenny
Legislative Director
Steyer, Ryan
Senior Policy Advisor
Steyer, Ryan
Senior Policy Advisor
Jarus, Allison
Legislative Assistant
Perrino, Jenny
Legislative Director
Perrino, Jenny
Legislative Director
Pruitt, Kobie
Legislative Assistant
Perrino, Jenny
Legislative Director
Perrino, Jenny
Legislative Director
Pruitt, Kobie
Legislative Assistant
Pruitt, Kobie
Legislative Assistant
Jarus, Allison
Legislative Assistant
Perrino, Jenny
Legislative Director
Smith, Jacob
Staff Assistant
Steyer, Ryan
Senior Policy Advisor
Steyer, Ryan
Senior Policy Advisor
Perrino, Jenny
Legislative Director
Steyer, Ryan
Senior Policy Advisor
Pruitt, Kobie
Legislative Assistant
Steyer, Ryan
Senior Policy Advisor
Pruitt, Kobie
Legislative Assistant
Pruitt, Kobie
Legislative Assistant
Jarus, Allison
Legislative Assistant
Pruitt, Kobie
Legislative Assistant
Jarus, Allison
Legislative Assistant
Steyer, Ryan
Senior Policy Advisor
Pruitt, Kobie
Legislative Assistant
Steyer, Ryan
Senior Policy Advisor
Perrino, Jenny
Legislative Director
Pruitt, Kobie
Legislative Assistant
Pruitt, Kobie
Legislative Assistant
Perrino, Jenny
Legislative Director
Perrino, Jenny
Legislative Director
Steyer, Ryan
Senior Policy Advisor
Steyer, Ryan
Senior Policy Advisor
Smith, Jacob
Staff Assistant
Steyer, Ryan
Senior Policy Advisor
Harris, Karen
Staff Assistant
Holland, Jennifer
Office Manager; Scheduler
Jarus, Allison
Legislative Assistant
Katich, Steve
Chief of Staff
Perrino, Jenny
Legislative Director
Pruitt, Kobie
Legislative Assistant
Rowe, Sue
Lead Caseworker; Scheduler
Ruvolo, Jane
Special Projects Assistant
Smith, Jacob
Staff Assistant
Sonneborn, Matt
Communications Director
Steyer, Ryan
Senior Policy Advisor
Turner, Nick
Staff Assistant
Steyer, Ryan
Senior Policy Advisor
Ruvolo, Jane
Special Projects Assistant
Rowe, Sue
Lead Caseworker; Scheduler
Katich, Steve
Chief of Staff
Sonneborn, Matt
Communications Director
Jarus, Allison
Legislative Assistant
Pruitt, Kobie
Legislative Assistant
Perrino, Jenny
Legislative Director
Holland, Jennifer
Office Manager; Scheduler
Holland, Jennifer
Office Manager; Scheduler
Rowe, Sue
Lead Caseworker; Scheduler
Harris, Karen
Staff Assistant
Smith, Jacob
Staff Assistant
Turner, Nick
Staff Assistant
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Marcy Kaptur Committees
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Marcy Kaptur Biography
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  • Elected: 1982, 16th term.
  • District: Ohio 9
  • Born: Jun. 17, 1946, Toledo
  • Home: Toledo
  • Education:

    U. of WI, B.A. 1968, U. of MI, M.A. 1974, M.I.T., 1981-82

  • Professional Career:

    Urban planner, Lucas Cnty. Planning Comm., 1969–75; Urban planning consultant, 1975–77; White House Asst. Dir. for Urban Affairs, 1977–80; Dpty. secy., Natl. Consumer Coop. Bank, 1980–81.

  • Ethnicity: White/Caucasian
  • Religion:

    Catholic

  • Family: Single

Democrat Marcy Kaptur, first elected in 1982, is now the most senior Democratic woman in the House—a distinction not lost on her in her occasional clashes with Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi. Kaptur is a plainspoken Democrat and a dedicated opponent of free trade who does not always toe the party line, but whose old-fashioned ways have proven popular at home. Read More

Democrat Marcy Kaptur, first elected in 1982, is now the most senior Democratic woman in the House—a distinction not lost on her in her occasional clashes with Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi. Kaptur is a plainspoken Democrat and a dedicated opponent of free trade who does not always toe the party line, but whose old-fashioned ways have proven popular at home.

Kaptur grew up in a blue-collar neighborhood in Toledo, the daughter of Polish-American parents who worked at local auto plants. The family also operated a small grocery store, but her father sold it to get a job with health benefits. “It broke his heart,” she said. She has spent almost her entire career in public service. She and her brother, Steve, live in the house where they grew up. She graduated from the University of Wisconsin, the first in her family to attend college, got a master’s degree from the University of Michigan, and then spent eight years as an urban planner in Toledo. She worked on urban revitalization in the Jimmy Carter White House, returning home in 1980 with thoughts of running for elected office. In 1982, she challenged Republican Ed Weber for the U.S. House seat and won 58%-39%, despite being outspent 3-to-1.

Kaptur has long been convinced that Toledo and places like it have lost jobs and industry because of unfair trade practices and low-wage competition from countries like Mexico and China. She was featured prominently in controversial liberal filmmaker Michael Moore’s 2009 movie Capitalism: A Love Story. “I have always said there’s a great injustice being done here, because the power rests with a handful of megabanks and millions of Americans are being affected,” she told the Toledo Blade when the film opened. In May 2011, Kaptur advocated for President Barack Obama’s proposal to end $4 billion in tax benefits to the oil industry.

Kaptur strongly opposed three trade agreements with Colombia, Panama, and South Korea that passed the House and were later signed into law by Obama in 2011. Kaptur took to the House floor during the debate to point out that the number of cars that the U.S. imported from South Korea dwarfed the number of American cars bought by people in the Northeast Asian nation. “These unfair, unbalanced agreements will not have a demonstrable, positive impact on job creation. We have lost six million manufacturing jobs in the past decade. Enough is enough,” she said.

In earlier decades, Kaptur was a dedicated opponent of the 1993 North American Free Trade Agreement in Congress. She criticized Democratic President Bill Clinton for ignoring Democrats opposed to NAFTA. She became a national figure in 1995, when she appeared before Texas businessman Ross Perot’s United We Stand Party and made a rousing speech on trade that had delegates cheering. Perot, running as a third-party candidate for president in 1996, offered her the vice presidential nomination a year later, but she turned it down. She was a vocal opponent of normal trade relations with China and the 2005 Central American Free Trade Agreement.

Reflecting on those early trade wars years later, Kaptur criticized Pelosi’s support of NAFTA. “That’s where the real knife was put in the flesh,” she said. When Pelosi announced in May 2007 an agreement with Treasury Secretary Hank Paulson on principles for international trade policy, an uninvited Kaptur glared from the back of the room. In 2002, she ran a quixotic, one-day campaign for minority leader against Pelosi but, predictably, got nowhere against the powerful California Democrat. In 2008, Kaptur challenged Pelosi ally Xavier Becerra of California for the leadership post of Democratic Caucus vice chairman and lost badly, 175-67. However, unlike some Democrats who have had issues with Pelosi, Kaptur backed her for minority leader in 2011 when her hold on power within the caucus was at its most tenuous. One of the dissenting Democrats, Daniel Lipinski of Illinois, cast his vote for Kaptur in a symbolic tribute to her as a “strong voice for American workers.”

When Washington state’s Norm Dicks retired in 2012, Kaptur hoped to succeed him as Appropriations’ ranking Democrat. But the post instead went to New York’s Nita Lowey, a more predictable liberal and a favorite of Pelosi’s. Although the minority leader officially remained neutral, news outlets reported that Lowey was widely perceived to have her friend’s backing. Kaptur settled for becoming ranking Democrat on the Energy and Water Development Subcommittee.

Kaptur has a liberal voting record, but departs from party orthodoxy on abortion—she opposes federal funding for abortion, though she also opposed an April 2011 House amendment that would have denied federal money to Planned Parenthood. She said she was confident that federal funds were not being used for abortions, and she argued that Planned Parenthood has provided valuable medical care for women. She is a strong advocate of alternative energy sources such as ethanol and biofuels for Ohio. But she made Democrats work to win her vote on energy and climate change legislation in 2009. Energy and Commerce Committee Chairman Henry Waxman, D-Calif., agreed to her demand to establish a new federal power authority with up to $3.5 billion available to lend to alternative energy projects in Ohio and other Midwestern states. Kaptur has recently sought to promote solar energy, a growing industry in Toledo.

Kaptur keeps close tabs on her district. A constituent gave her the idea to sponsor the legislation that created the World War II Memorial on the Washington Mall. On Appropriations, she has focused on improvements to bridges, roads, and rail and port facilities in her district. In 2010, she ranked 24th among the top earmark recipients in the House, according to the group Taxpayers for Common Sense. She once challenged Republicans on the committee to limit farm payments, but when they threatened her favorite spending projects, she backed off. “I may be blockheaded sometimes, but I’m not stupid,” Kaptur said.

Kaptur, who wrote a book on women in Congress, is exceedingly popular in the Toledo area and was rarely challenged at election time until 2012. Ohio lost two congressional seats in the 2010 reapportionment, and state Republicans drawing the new map put her in a district with fellow Democratic Rep. Dennis Kucinich. Though the ultraliberal Kucinich’s earlier bids for president had made him a national hero to hard-core progressives, he had a reputation at home for being more interested in hobnobbing with celebrities than accomplishing much for the district. He also didn’t help himself by briefly toying with the idea of running in Washington state.

Kaptur beat him easily in the Democratic primary, 56%-40%, putting an end to his 16-year House career. (In Toledo’s Lucas County, she took 94% to his 4%.) She had an even easier time in the general election against Republican Samuel Wurzelbacher, better known as “Joe the Plumber” for his role in a 2008 presidential debate. The Cook Political Report called his candidacy “one of the biggest pipe dreams of the year,” and Kaptur trounced him, 73%-23%.

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Marcy Kaptur Election Results
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2012 General
Marcy Kaptur (D)
Votes: 217,771
Percent: 73.04%
Samuel Wurzelbacher (R)
Votes: 68,668
Percent: 23.03%
Sean Stipe (Lib)
Votes: 11,725
Percent: 3.93%
2012 Primary
Marcy Kaptur (D)
Votes: 42,902
Percent: 56.18%
Dennis Kucinich (D)
Votes: 30,564
Percent: 40.02%
Prior Winning Percentages
2010 (59%), 2008 (74%), 2006 (74%), 2004 (68%), 2002 (74%), 2000 (75%), 1998 (81%), 1996 (77%), 1994 (75%), 1992 (74%), 1990 (78%), 1988 (81%), 1986 (78%), 1984 (55%), 1982 (58%)
Marcy Kaptur Votes and Bills
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National Journal’s rating system is an objective method of analyzing voting. The liberal score means that the lawmaker’s votes were more liberal than that percentage of his colleagues’ votes. The conservative score means his votes were more conservative than that percentage of his colleagues’ votes. The composite score is an average of a lawmaker’s six issue-based scores. See all NJ Voting

More Liberal
More Conservative
2013 2012 2011
Economic 75 (L) : 25 (C) 78 (L) : 21 (C) 72 (L) : 28 (C)
Social 65 (L) : 35 (C) 78 (L) : 19 (C) 65 (L) : 34 (C)
Foreign 71 (L) : 29 (C) 68 (L) : 31 (C) 73 (L) : 26 (C)
Composite 70.3 (L) : 29.7 (C) 75.5 (L) : 24.5 (C) 70.3 (L) : 29.7 (C)
Interest Group Ratings

The vote ratings by 10 special interest groups provide insight into a lawmaker’s general ideology and the degree to which he or she agrees with the group’s point of view. Two organizations provide just one combined rating for 2011 and 2012, the two sessions of the 112th Congress. They are the ACLU and the ITIC. About the interest groups.

20112012
FRC2016
LCV8983
CFG99
ITIC-42
NTU109
20112012
COC13-
ACLU-84
ACU40
ADA9085
AFSCME100-
Key House Votes

The key votes show how a member of Congress voted on the major bills of the year. N indicates a "no" vote; Y a "yes" vote. If a member voted "present" or was absent, the bill caption is not shown. For a complete description of the bills included in key votes, see the Almanac's Guide to Usage.

    • Pass GOP budget
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • End fiscal cliff
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Extend payroll tax cut
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Stop student loan hike
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • Repeal health care
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • Raise debt limit
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Pass cut, cap, balance
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Defund Planned Parenthood
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Repeal lightbulb ban
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Add endangered listings
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Speed troop withdrawal
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Regulate financial firms
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2010
    • Pass tax cuts for some
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2010
    • Stop detainee transfers
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2010
    • Legalize immigrants' kids
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2010
    • Repeal don't ask, tell
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2010
    • Limit campaign funds
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2010
    • Overturn Ledbetter
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Pass $820 billion stimulus
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Let guns in national parks
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Pass cap-and-trade
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Bar federal abortion funds
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Pass health care bill
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Bail out financial markets
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2008
    • Repeal D.C. gun law
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2008
    • Overhaul FISA
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2008
    • Increase minimum wage
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
    • Expand SCHIP
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
    • Raise CAFE standards
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
    • Share immigration data
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • Foreign aid abortion ban
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
    • Ban gay bias in workplace
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
    • Withdraw troops 8/08
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
    • No operations in Iran
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
    • Free trade with Peru
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
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The Almanac is a members-only database of searchable profiles compiled and adapted from the Almanac of American Politics. Comprehensive online profiles include biographical and political summaries of elected officials, campaign expenditures, voting records, interest-group ratings, and congressional staff look-ups. In-depth overviews of each state and house district are included as well, along with demographic data, analysis of voting trends, and political histories.
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