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Republican

Rep. Doc Hastings (R)

Doc Hastings Contact
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Email: n/a
DC Contact Information

Phone: 202-225-5816

Address: 1203 LHOB, DC 20515

Doc Hastings Biography
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  • Elected: 1994, 10th term.
  • District: Washington 4
  • Born: Feb. 07, 1941, Spokane
  • Home: Pasco
  • Education:

    Columbia Basin Col., attended 1959-61, Central Washington U., attended 1964

  • Professional Career:

    Pres., Columbia Basin Paper & Supply, 1967–94.

  • Military Career:

    Army Reserve, 1964–69.

  • Political Career:

    WA House, 1978–86.

  • Religion:

    Protestant

  • Family: Married (Claire); 3 children

Doc Hastings, a Republican first elected in 1994, is a close friend and ally of Speaker John Boehner. He is chairman of the Natural Resources Committee, giving him an influential platform to lead the Republican Party’s push for more domestic energy extraction. But he grew weary of trying to get such legislation through a Democratically-controlled Senate and announced in February 2014 that he wouldn't seek another term. Read More

Doc Hastings, a Republican first elected in 1994, is a close friend and ally of Speaker John Boehner. He is chairman of the Natural Resources Committee, giving him an influential platform to lead the Republican Party’s push for more domestic energy extraction. But he grew weary of trying to get such legislation through a Democratically-controlled Senate and announced in February 2014 that he wouldn't seek another term.

Hastings grew up in the Tri-Cities, went to college in Ellensburg, and is one of the few members of Congress without a college degree. He got his nickname from a brother who could not pronounce his given name, Richard, when they were kids. Hastings served in the Army Reserve and for 27 years ran the Columbia Basin Paper & Supply Company in Pasco, where he was also president of the Chamber of Commerce. In 1979, he was elected to the state House, served as a Republican leader, and then retired in 1987.

In 1992, he won the Republican nomination for the U.S. House seat, but was beaten 51%-49% by Democrat Jay Inslee. In office, Inslee voted for the Clinton budget and tax package and for a crime bill with its gun-control provisions—big liabilities when he ran for reelection in 1994 and faced Hastings again. In their second contest, Hastings won 53%-47%. Since then, Democrats have not seriously competed here.

In the House, Hastings has had a mostly conservative voting record, especially on economic and environmental issues. Shortly after the 2010 elections handed Republicans control of the House, Hastings startled party veterans by formally demanding that his committee take jurisdiction over energy-related issues from the Energy and Commerce Committee, which he called “a Goliath” with an unequal share of power among committees. Not surprisingly, Republicans on Energy and Commerce fought the encroachment, and GOP leaders nixed the idea. After the 2012 elections, he took another poke at Energy and Commerce by unsuccessfully proposing a new House committee to consolidate power over all health-related programs.

Hastings has led the criticism of the Obama administration’s National Oceans Policy, a 2010 executive order providing guidance on the management of oceans, coastlines, and the Great Lakes. He has held numerous committee hearings on the policy, questioning administration officials, scientists, and industry members about what he considers to be a chief example of the regulatory burdens that Democrats have clamped on economic growth. Another priority for him has been reauthorization of the Magnuson-Stevens Act, which sets limits on catching certain types of fish. He accused the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration in 2011 of being “overly cautionary” in setting what he called “artificially low harvest levels.”

With gasoline prices rising in May 2011, the House passed Hastings’ bill requiring the Obama administration to speed up sales of offshore oil leases in the Gulf of Mexico and off Virginia’s coast. The measure was one of several that Hastings had developed after conversations with Republicans and energy lobbyists. Thirty-three Democrats joined a mostly unanimous GOP in supporting the bill, though senior Natural Resources Democrats complained that Hastings was ignoring the lessons of 2010’s BP oil spill disaster. He said earlier that he was open to considering oil spill legislation if the White House agreed to more offshore drilling. In 2012, he unveiled a bill that would allow drilling rigs off the coasts of Maine, California, Oregon, and Washington, as well as in Alaska’s Bristol Bay, which environmentalists note hosts the world’s largest wild salmon run.

Until 2009, Hastings had a seat on the leadership-run Rules Committee, and he has been a prominent behind-the-scenes player in the GOP caucus. Hastings also was part of the unanimous, 10-member Ethics Committee panel in 2004 that voted to admonish Majority Leader Tom DeLay of Texas three times, the mildest possible sanction. In what was viewed as a ham-handed rebuke to the committee for even mildly punishing DeLay, then-Republican Speaker Dennis Hastert removed Colorado’s Joel Hefley as chairman and replaced him with Hastings.

The next year, Hastings was at the center of another dustup. He supported the GOP leadership’s change in House rules to make it harder to launch investigations of members. He also ousted the ethics committee’s top staff. When committee Democrats protested by refusing to attend committee meetings, Hastings and the Republicans agreed to restore the earlier rules. He had hoped to chair Rules in the 113th Congress (2013-14), but Boehner gave the job to departing National Republican Congressional Committee Chairman Pete Sessions of Texas after several senior Republicans reportedly went to bat for Sessions.

Hastings is a vocal defender of Washington’s apple and asparagus industries, and during the 110th Congress (2007-08), he voted against the United States-Peru Trade Promotion Agreement Implementation Act and an extension of the 1991 Andean Trade Preference Act, both of which he said hurt Washington growers. He led an effort in 2012 to get Indonesia to reconsider restrictions on U.S. fruit and vegetable imports. Much of his time has been spent on issues surrounding the Hanford Nuclear Reservation. When President George W. Bush proposed cuts in the Energy Department budget, Hastings protected the Hanford cleanup program from reductions.

Hastings says that his proudest legislative achievement was the 2003 passage of the Citizens’ Soldier Act, which makes legal immigrants serving in the military eligible for citizenship after one year in uniform.

In announcing his retirement, Hastings became one of several key Boehner allies to exit Capitol Hill. “Last Friday, I celebrated my 73rd birthday and while I have the ability and seniority to continue serving Central Washington, it is time for the voters to choose a new person with new energy to represent them in the people’s House,” he said in a statement.

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Doc Hastings Election Results
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2012 General (Top-Two General)
Doc Hastings (R)
Votes: 154,749
Percent: 66.22%
Mary Baechler (D)
Votes: 78,940
Percent: 33.78%
2012 Primary (Top-Two Primary)
Doc Hastings (R)
Votes: 60,774
Percent: 59.32%
Mary Baechler (D)
Votes: 27,130
Percent: 26.48%
Jamie Wheeler (R)
Votes: 11,581
Percent: 11.3%
Prior Winning Percentages
2010 (68%), 2008 (63%), 2006 (60%), 2004 (63%), 2002 (67%), 2000 (61%), 1998 (69%), 1996 (53%), 1994 (53%)
Doc Hastings Votes and Bills
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National Journal’s rating system is an objective method of analyzing voting. The liberal score means that the lawmaker’s votes were more liberal than that percentage of his colleagues’ votes. The conservative score means his votes were more conservative than that percentage of his colleagues’ votes. The composite score is an average of a lawmaker’s six issue-based scores. See all NJ Voting

More Liberal
More Conservative
2013 2012 2011
Economic 38 (L) : 61 (C) 40 (L) : 58 (C) 23 (L) : 77 (C)
Social 34 (L) : 62 (C) 36 (L) : 62 (C) 27 (L) : 71 (C)
Foreign 34 (L) : 60 (C) 20 (L) : 73 (C) 16 (L) : 84 (C)
Composite 37.2 (L) : 62.8 (C) 33.8 (L) : 66.2 (C) 22.3 (L) : 77.7 (C)
Interest Group Ratings

The vote ratings by 10 special interest groups provide insight into a lawmaker’s general ideology and the degree to which he or she agrees with the group’s point of view. Two organizations provide just one combined rating for 2011 and 2012, the two sessions of the 112th Congress. They are the ACLU and the ITIC. About the interest groups.

20112012
FRC8083
LCV93
CFG5261
ITIC-92
NTU6867
20112012
COC100-
ACLU-0
ACU7784
ADA05
AFSCME0-
Key House Votes

The key votes show how a member of Congress voted on the major bills of the year. N indicates a "no" vote; Y a "yes" vote. If a member voted "present" or was absent, the bill caption is not shown. For a complete description of the bills included in key votes, see the Almanac's Guide to Usage.

    • Pass GOP budget
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • End fiscal cliff
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Extend payroll tax cut
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Find AG in contempt
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Stop student loan hike
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Repeal health care
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Raise debt limit
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Pass cut, cap, balance
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Defund Planned Parenthood
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Repeal lightbulb ban
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Add endangered listings
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Regulate financial firms
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2010
    • Pass tax cuts for some
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2010
    • Stop detainee transfers
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2010
    • Legalize immigrants' kids
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2010
    • Repeal don't ask, tell
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2010
    • Limit campaign funds
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2010
    • Overturn Ledbetter
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Pass $820 billion stimulus
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Let guns in national parks
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Pass cap-and-trade
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Bar federal abortion funds
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Pass health care bill
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Bail out financial markets
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2008
    • Repeal D.C. gun law
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2008
    • Overhaul FISA
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2008
    • Increase minimum wage
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • Expand SCHIP
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • Raise CAFE standards
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • Share immigration data
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
    • Foreign aid abortion ban
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
    • Ban gay bias in workplace
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • Withdraw troops 8/08
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • No operations in Iran
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • Free trade with Peru
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
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The Almanac is a members-only database of searchable profiles compiled and adapted from the Almanac of American Politics. Comprehensive online profiles include biographical and political summaries of elected officials, campaign expenditures, voting records, interest-group ratings, and congressional staff look-ups. In-depth overviews of each state and house district are included as well, along with demographic data, analysis of voting trends, and political histories.
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