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Republican

Sen. Lindsey Graham (R)

Lindsey Graham Contact
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Email: n/a
DC Contact Information

Phone: 202-224-5972

Address: 290 RSOB, DC 20510

State Office Contact Information

Phone: (864) 250-1417

Address: 130 South Main Street, Greenville SC 29601-4870

Columbia SC

Phone: (803) 933-0112

Fax: (803) 933-0957

Address: 508 Hampton Street, Columbia SC 29201-2718

Mt. Pleasant SC

Phone: (843) 849-3887

Fax: (843) 971-3669

Address: 530 Johnnie Dodds Boulevard, Mt. Pleasant SC 29464-3029

Florence SC

Phone: (843) 669-1505

Fax: (843) 669-9015

Address: 401 West Evans Street, Florence SC 29501-3460

Pendleton SC

Phone: (864) 646-4090

Address: 124 Exchange Street, Pendleton SC 29678

Rock Hill SC

Phone: (803) 366-2828

Fax: (803) 366-5353

Address: 235 East Main Street, Rock Hill SC 29730

Lindsey Graham Staff
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Sort by INTEREST NAME TITLE
Graber, Scott
Legislative Aide
Boney, Virginia
Deputy Director of Appropriations and Projects
Abele, Craig
Military Legislative Assistant
Graber, Scott
Legislative Aide
Abele, Craig
Military Legislative Assistant
Graber, Scott
Legislative Aide
Graber, Scott
Legislative Aide
Graber, Scott
Legislative Aide
Abele, Craig
Military Legislative Assistant
Graber, Scott
Legislative Aide
Abele, Craig
Military Legislative Assistant
Abele, Craig
Military Legislative Assistant
Abele, Craig
Military Legislative Assistant
Abele, Craig
Military Legislative Assistant
Graber, Scott
Legislative Aide
Abele, Craig
Military Legislative Assistant
Graber, Scott
Legislative Aide
Graber, Scott
Legislative Aide
Abele, Craig
Military Legislative Assistant
Graber, Scott
Legislative Aide
Graber, Scott
Legislative Aide
Graber, Scott
Legislative Aide
Graber, Scott
Legislative Aide
Abele, Craig
Military Legislative Assistant
Abele, Craig
Military Legislative Assistant
Graber, Scott
Legislative Aide
Graber, Scott
Legislative Aide
Abele, Craig
Military Legislative Assistant
Jaillette, Scott
Constituent Services Representative
Tuten, Bill
Low Country Regional Director
Abele, Craig
Military Legislative Assistant
Bishop, Kevin
Communications Director
Boney, Virginia
Deputy Director of Appropriations and Projects
Brown, Rene
State Projects Coordinator
Cato, Van
State Director
Connick, Lorcan
Deputy Communications Director
Cooper, Alice
Constituent Services Representative
Dix, Jonathan
Constituent Services Representative
Graber, Scott
Legislative Aide
Howell, Paul
Constituent Services Representative
Jaillette, Scott
Constituent Services Representative
James, Alice
Press Secretary; Scheduler
King, Andrew
Deputy Chief of Staff
Omer, Angela
Constituent Services Representative
Rimkunas, Matt
Legislative Director
Rowland, Yvette
Midlands Regional Director
Sykes, Patricia
Constituent Services; State INS Manager
Thomas, Teresa
Piedmont Outreach Director
Thrasher, Leslie
Constituent Services Representative
Trotter, Roxie
Constituent Services Representative
Turner, Laura
Upstate Regional Director
Tuten, Bill
Low Country Regional Director
Urquhart, Celia
Pee Dee Regional Director
Graber, Scott
Legislative Aide
Bishop, Kevin
Communications Director
Sykes, Patricia
Constituent Services; State INS Manager
Brown, Rene
State Projects Coordinator
King, Andrew
Deputy Chief of Staff
Connick, Lorcan
Deputy Communications Director
Boney, Virginia
Deputy Director of Appropriations and Projects
Cato, Van
State Director
Rowland, Yvette
Midlands Regional Director
Thomas, Teresa
Piedmont Outreach Director
Turner, Laura
Upstate Regional Director
Tuten, Bill
Low Country Regional Director
Urquhart, Celia
Pee Dee Regional Director
Abele, Craig
Military Legislative Assistant
Rimkunas, Matt
Legislative Director
Sykes, Patricia
Constituent Services; State INS Manager
James, Alice
Press Secretary; Scheduler
Cooper, Alice
Constituent Services Representative
Dix, Jonathan
Constituent Services Representative
Howell, Paul
Constituent Services Representative
Jaillette, Scott
Constituent Services Representative
Omer, Angela
Constituent Services Representative
Thrasher, Leslie
Constituent Services Representative
Trotter, Roxie
Constituent Services Representative
James, Alice
Press Secretary; Scheduler
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Lindsey Graham Committees
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Lindsey Graham Biography
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  • Elected: 2002, term expires 2020, 3rd term.
  • State: South Carolina
  • Born: Jul. 09, 1955, Central
  • Home: Seneca
  • Education:

    U. of SC, B.A. 1977, J.D. 1981

  • Professional Career:

    U.S. Air Forces Europe Circuit Trial Counsel, 1984–88; Asst. Oconee Cnty. atty., 1988–92; Practicing atty., 1988–94; Judge advocate, McEntire Air Natl. Guard Base, 1989–94; Central SC city atty., 1990–94.

  • Military Career:

    Air Force, 1982–88; SC Air Natl. Guard, 1989–94 (Operation Desert Storm); Air Force Reserve, 1995–present.

  • Political Career:

    SC House, 1992–94; U.S. House, 1994-2002.

  • Ethnicity: White/Caucasian
  • Religion:

    Baptist

  • Family: Single

Republican Lindsey Graham, South Carolina’s senior senator, was elected to the House in 1994 and to the Senate in 2002. He and his close friend, Arizona Republican John McCain, are the Senate’s two high-profile defense hawks; on domestic issues, Graham sometimes confounds conservatives by collaborating with Democrats, but he also can be a lacerating critic of the other party. Read More

Republican Lindsey Graham, South Carolina’s senior senator, was elected to the House in 1994 and to the Senate in 2002. He and his close friend, Arizona Republican John McCain, are the Senate’s two high-profile defense hawks; on domestic issues, Graham sometimes confounds conservatives by collaborating with Democrats, but he also can be a lacerating critic of the other party.

Graham grew up in Pickens County, where his parents owned a tavern in the textile mill town of Central, S.C. Both his parents died young, while Graham was still attending the University of South Carolina, and he became his younger sister’s legal guardian. He was the first in his family to graduate from college, and then received a law degree from the University of South Carolina. He was an Air Force prosecutor who worked on assignments overseas, including one case that led to major changes in the service’s drug testing program for soldiers. In 1988, he returned home and practiced law in Seneca. In 1992, he was elected to the state House. Graham was called up to active duty and served stateside during the Gulf War, and he has been in the Air Force Reserve since 1995 as a senior instructor in the Air Force’s JAG school and also as a reserve judge on the Air Force Court of Criminal Appeals.

In 1994, with the retirement of 20-year Democratic U.S. Rep. Butler Derrick, Graham ran for the House. Both parties had contested primaries, and Graham won the Republican primary without a runoff with 52% of the vote. In the general election, he faced state Sen. Jim Bryan. Graham called for term limits, supported more defense spending, and opposed gays in the military. His attitude toward the Clinton administration and the Democratic leadership was unequivocal. He said, “I’m one less vote for an agenda that makes you want to throw up.” Graham won 60%-40%, a smashing victory in a district represented only by Democrats since Reconstruction.

In the House, Graham had a solidly conservative voting record but did not always support the Republican leadership. In the summer of 1997, he was among a small group of junior House members who plotted with some senior lawmakers to try to oust Speaker Newt Gingrich, who by then had lost the confidence of his Republican troops. The attempt failed. In a Republican Conference meeting, when Majority Leader Dick Armey of Texas, one of the plotters, asserted that no member of the leadership was involved, Graham challenged that assertion as false.

As a member of the House Judiciary Committee, Graham played a major role in the 1998 impeachment of President Bill Clinton. In the Senate trial, Graham’s folksy manner and clear description of Clinton’s offenses—“Where I come from, a man who calls someone up at 2:30 in the morning is up to no good”—made him one of the most effective GOP impeachment managers. In 2000, Graham was one of McCain’s staunchest supporters in his first bid for the presidency.

In 2002, Graham ran for the Senate seat of Republican Sen. Strom Thurmond, who was in his 90s and had made it clear he would not seek a ninth term. There had not been an open South Carolina Senate seat since 1941. In this now heavily Republican state, Graham had no opposition in the Republican primary. His work on impeachment and in the McCain campaign made him well-known and popular statewide, and he was endorsed by three former governors and Thurmond. Democrats portrayed him as lacking in substance and recruited Alex Sanders, president of the College of Charleston who in 1985 was appointed to the state Court of Appeals.

Sanders was a gifted raconteur, charming and well-connected around the state. He was a solid fundraiser as well, eventually raising $4.2 million, below Graham’s $6.2 million, but a considerable achievement for a candidate consistently behind in the polls. He supported the Bush tax cuts and military action in Iraq. But he opposed the death penalty, on religious grounds, and he opposed a constitutional amendment to allow criminalization of flag burning. Graham hammered him on the death penalty and the flag amendment but most of all tried to label him as a liberal, saying Sanders would advance the agenda of Sens. Hillary Clinton of New York and Edward Kennedy of Massachusetts. Graham won 54%-44% and took the place of a senator first elected in the year before he was born.

He has had a mostly conservative voting record, though he has shown more centrist tendencies in recent years—he was the 24th most conservative senator in 2010, and then slipped to 42nd in 2011, 33rd in 2012 and 40th in 2013, according to National Journal’s annual rankings. He has made some noteworthy breaks with his party, occasionally testing the limits of Republicans’ patience. Graham was the only Judiciary Committee Republican to support President Barack Obama’s choice of Sonia Sotomayor for the Supreme Court in 2009, saying the president deserved the prerogative to nominate a qualified person of his choice even if the GOP disagreed with her ideology. He took the same position a year later when Obama nominated Solicitor General Elena Kagan for the court. In addition to praising her intellect, he said, “She’s funny, and that goes a long way in my book.”

In February 2009, he said he supported a limited nationalization of some banks and Obama’s proposal to “stress-test” banks. “I’m not going to be the Herbert Hoover of 2009, saying ‘Just let the free market work it out,’” he told the Charlotte Observer. And he incensed tea party activists by declaring to The New York Times in 2010 that the movement would “die out” because it “can never come up with a coherent vision for governing the country.” When Kentucky GOP Sen. Rand Paul staged a 13-hour talking filibuster in March 2013 in partial protest of the administration’s power to use unmanned drones to kill U.S. citizens, Graham dismissed Paul’s concerns to the Associated Press as “paranoia between libertarians and the hard left that is unjustified.”

Graham shored up his standing among conservatives by turning aggressively confrontational on several high-profile issues beginning in 2012. Many of them involved national security. He and McCain led a successful push to derail U.N. Ambassador Susan Rice’s chances to become secretary of State after they sharply questioned her role in responding to the deadly September 2012 terrorist consulate attack in Benghazi, Libya. Graham told Fox News that outgoing Secretary of State Hillary Clinton “got away with murder” for not foreseeing the threat in Benghazi. The two senators also were at the forefront of opposing the nomination of their former colleague, Republican Chuck Hagel of Nebraska, to become secretary of Defense because of what they considered his insufficient support for Israel and hawkishness on Iran, although Hagel eventually was confirmed.

After Obama's decision in June 2014 to swap imprisoned Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl for five Taliban leaders held captive at Guantanamo, Graham said the president could be impeached if he agreed to any such exchanges in the future. And he warned that same month that the "seeds of 9/11 are being planted all over Iraq and Syria" in calling for a more aggressive U.S. response in both nations.

Graham’s sharp turn toward conservativism extended to fiscal and social policy. During the 2012 showdown over spending and taxes, he faulted Obama for not “manning up” and told Fox News his party needed to take a tough approach on the next vote to raise the federal debt limit. “We’re not going to let Obama borrow any more money, or any American Congress borrow any more money, until we fix this country from becoming Greece,” he said. Meanwhile, Graham took a hard line against sweeping new gun control measures such as a ban on assault weapons, instead introducing a bill to strengthen mental health provisions in gun background checks. And after getting pressure from conservative activists in March 2013, he opposed the nomination of Caitlin Halligan to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia.

Graham has continued to work in a bipartisan fashion on immigration, an issue with which he has long grappled. He was part of a group of senators, four Democrats and four Republicans, which hammered out a plan in early 2013 to tighten border security, visa tracking, and workplace verification in exchange for providing a path toward citizenship for the country’s estimated 11 million undocumented workers. “I am confident, very confident, that if I help solve this problem in a way that we won’t have 20 million illegal immigrants 20 years from now, not only will I get reelected, I can look back and say I was involved in something that was important,” he told McClatchy Newspapers.

Graham earlier had worked with Democratic Sen. Charles Schumer of New York on immigration, coming up with a plan to toughen border security and require biometric Social Security cards to ensure illegal immigrants could not get jobs. But Graham later joined conservatives in calling for an end to birthright citizenship, a position that incensed his onetime immigration allies. “He has either taken leave of his senses or of his principles,” former Bush speechwriter Michael Gerson wrote in The Washington Post. Graham joined Republicans in opposing the DREAM Act giving the children of illegal immigrants a potential path to citizenship in December 2010.

In 2006 and 2007, Graham supported the McCain-Kennedy and Kennedy-Kyl immigration bills, positions that got him in considerable trouble with conservatives who opposed giving illegal immigrants a process to achieve citizenship. Radio talk show host Rush Limbaugh belittled him as “Lindsey Grahamnesty,” and the Greenville County Republican Party voted to censure him. Graham’s public comments suggesting that immigration bill opponents were “bigots” did not help his cause.

Graham has been less active in recent years on climate change. He had worked with Massachusetts Democratic Sen. John Kerry and Connecticut independent Sen. Joe Lieberman on a method of pricing carbon that would be an alternative to the House’s 2009 bill creating a cap-and-trade system for companies emitting the greenhouse gases. But Graham angrily pulled out of those discussions in April 2010 when Majority Leader Harry Reid reportedly planned to bring an immigration bill to the Senate floor before taking up the energy and climate change measure. Since then, Graham has said little about the subject. But his efforts helped earn him an April 2014 fundraiser co-hosted by Fred Krupp, president of the Environmental Defense Fund -- something that raised eyebrows among Democrats.

Graham parted with the Bush administration on important issues. He voted against the Medicare prescription drug bill in 2003 and against the Republican medical malpractice bill in 2003 and 2004, calling it “one of the worst pieces of legislation I have ever seen.” But he cosponsored a bill requiring that the losing party pay the other side’s legal fees in lawsuits between parties from different states. In 2005, he proposed a federal law shielding reporters from having to disclose their sources in court. He also was hard on the administration over its increasingly bold techniques in terrorism investigations. He objected to surveillance of communications between al-Qaida suspects abroad and persons in the United States. He was also a critic of the policy of holding unlawful combatants at Guantanamo Bay without offering them an array of rights.

Since his arrival in the Senate, Graham has been interested in solutions to the Social Security solvency issue. In 2003, he unveiled his own plan: personal retirement accounts, with higher taxes for workers who do not choose them. The proposal was sharply criticized by some conservatives, but Graham persisted. He participated in private meetings with both Democratic and Republican senators, and he insisted that raising the payroll tax limit was necessary if a plan were to get Democratic support. He later recruited two freshman senators who were tea party favorites, Paul and Mike Lee of Utah, to work with him on Social Security.

Comparing his political style to McCain’s, Graham told The New York Times: “I’ve never been a Luke Skywalker; I’m a much more calculating guy than that. I understand that you just don’t charge into these things based on some moral belief that you’re right and the other guy’s wrong.” Without much of a threat to his own reelection bid, Graham in 2008 traveled the country with McCain, the Republican presidential nominee. McCain, Graham, and Lieberman formed a sort of bipartisan triumvirate on the campaign trail. Graham’s support was helpful to McCain in the pivotal January 2008 South Carolina primary, in which McCain redeemed his 2000 loss by winning with 33% of the vote. “There’s nobody I trust more than Lindsey Graham,” McCain told the Myrtle Beach Sun News. Graham was said to be the member of McCain’s inner circle who was the most enthusiastic about him tapping Lieberman as his running mate, according to the 2010 book about the campaign, Game Change. But McCain settled on Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin after Graham began privately floating the idea of Lieberman with social conservatives, enraging Limbaugh and others when word leaked out.

Graham’s departures from party orthodoxy fueled talk of a primary challenger in 2014. A Public Policy Polling survey in February 2011 found that 52% of regular GOP primary voters said they would back a more conservative choice. But no big-name aspirants had emerged. “Lindsey Graham is a street fighter when it comes to elections,” former South Carolina GOP Chair Katon Dawson told National Journal. “He works. He’s got a tough hide.”

Graham avoided the fate of other GOP colleagues sweating out tea-party challenges by running a flawless campaign. He raised more than $12 million and put together an impressive on-the-ground operation featuring more than 5,000 precinct captains and six field offices around South Carolina. He kept his most prominent potential opponents out of the race, in part by helping one of them, Rep. Mick Mulvaney, land a seat on the House Financial Services Committee. "When the members of the congressional delegation needed something for their district, their first call was to Lindsey Graham and it was to his cell phone. Lindsey Graham has been accessible to that federal delegation from day one," said former South Carolina Republican Party Chairman Katon Dawson, who ran a super PAC backing Graham.

On the campaign trail, Graham didn't try to deny that Washington had grown dysfunctional -- but portrayed himself as one of those brave enough to seek a solution. "I'm trying to tell the tea party, I understand your frustration, but being frustrated is not enough," he told The Atlantic. He added, "I know Washington is broken, but what's broken about it is everybody yelling and nobody trying to fix it. I'm trying." National tea-party and other conservative groups ended up staying away; even the Senate Conservatives Fund, which supported other long-shot candidates, steered clear. He got a further boost by drawing six challengers instead of one or two, and walked away from the June primary with 56% -- well above the 50% level that would have triggered a runoff. From there, he had little trouble in the general election.

Even before he won another term, Graham mused about dipping his toe in a bid for the White House. "If I get through my general election, if nobody steps up in the presidential mix, if nobody's out there talking — me and McCain have been talking — I may just jump in to get to make these arguments" about a hawkish foreign policy, he told The Weekly Standard. However, he later told an audience that he wasn't certain he could raise enough money to be competitive. McCain egged him on to consider it. “Have you see ever seen Senator Graham in a debate, on the floor of the Senate? He will do wonderful," he told reporters.

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Lindsey Graham Election Results
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2008 General
Lindsey Graham (R)
Votes: 1,076,534
Percent: 57.52%
Spent: $9,713,500
Bob Conley
Votes: 790,621
Percent: 42.25%
Spent: $17,105
2008 Primary
Lindsey Graham (R)
Votes: 187,736
Percent: 66.84%
Buddy Witherspoon
Votes: 93,125
Percent: 33.16%
Prior Winning Percentages
2002 (54%); House: 2000 (68%), 1998 (100%), 1996 (60%), 1994 (60%)
Lindsey Graham Votes and Bills
Back to top NJ Vote Ratings

National Journal’s rating system is an objective method of analyzing voting. The liberal score means that the lawmaker’s votes were more liberal than that percentage of his colleagues’ votes. The conservative score means his votes were more conservative than that percentage of his colleagues’ votes. The composite score is an average of a lawmaker’s six issue-based scores. See all NJ Voting

More Liberal
More Conservative
2013 2012 2011
Economic 28 (L) : 71 (C) 9 (L) : 90 (C) 36 (L) : 63 (C)
Social 39 (L) : 60 (C) 37 (L) : 62 (C) 37 (L) : 62 (C)
Foreign 38 (L) : 61 (C) 38 (L) : 61 (C) 43 (L) : 56 (C)
Composite 35.5 (L) : 64.5 (C) 28.5 (L) : 71.5 (C) 39.2 (L) : 60.8 (C)
Interest Group Ratings

The vote ratings by 10 special interest groups provide insight into a lawmaker’s general ideology and the degree to which he or she agrees with the group’s point of view. Two organizations provide just one combined rating for 2011 and 2012, the two sessions of the 112th Congress. They are the ACLU and the ITIC. About the interest groups.

20112012
FRC5757
LCV921
CFG7286
ITIC-100
NTU7680
20112012
COC82-
ACLU-25
ACU7592
ADA250
AFSCME0-
Key Senate Votes

The key votes show how a member of Congress voted on the major bills of the year. N indicates a "no" vote; Y a "yes" vote. If a member voted "present" or was absent, the bill caption is not shown. For a complete description of the bills included in key votes, see the Almanac's Guide to Usage.

    • End fiscal cliff
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Block faith exemptions
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • Approve gas pipeline
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Approve farm bill
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • Let cyber bill proceed
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • Block Gitmo transfers
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Raise debt limit
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Pass balanced budget amendment
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Stop EPA climate regulations
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Proceed to Cordray vote
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Require talking filibuster
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Limit Fannie/Freddie
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Regulate financial firms
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2010
    • Pass tax cuts for some
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2010
    • Legalize immigrants' kids
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2010
    • Ratify New START
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2010
    • Confirm Elena Kagan
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2010
    • Stop EPA climate regs
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2010
    • Repeal don't ask, tell
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2010
    • Overturn Ledbetter
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Block release of TARP funds
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Pass $787 billion stimulus
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Repeal DC gun laws
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Confirm Sonia Sotomayor
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Pass health care bill
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Bar budget rules for climate bill
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Pass 2010 budget resolution
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Let judges adjust mortgages
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Allow FDA to regulate tobacco
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Protect gays from hate crimes
    • Vote:
    • Year: 2009
    • Cut F-22 funds
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Label North Korea terrorist state
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Build Guantanamo replacement
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Allow federal funds for abortion
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Cap greenhouse gases
    • Vote:
    • Year: 2008
    • Bail out financial markets
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2008
    • Increase missile defense $
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2008
    • Overhaul FISA
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2008
    • Raise CAFE standards
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
    • Expand SCHIP
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • Make English official language
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
    • Path to citizenship
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
    • Fetus is unborn child
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
    • Prosecute hate crimes
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • Withdraw troops 3/08
    • Vote:
    • Year: 2007
    • Iran guard is terrorist group
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
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The Almanac is a members-only database of searchable profiles compiled and adapted from the Almanac of American Politics. Comprehensive online profiles include biographical and political summaries of elected officials, campaign expenditures, voting records, interest-group ratings, and congressional staff look-ups. In-depth overviews of each state and house district are included as well, along with demographic data, analysis of voting trends, and political histories.
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