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Republican

Sen. Mike Lee (R)

Mike Lee Contact
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Email: n/a
DC Contact Information

Phone: 202-224-5444

Address: 316 HSOB, DC 20510

Websites: lee.senate.gov
State Office Contact Information

Phone: (801) 524-5933

Address: 125 South State Street, Salt Lake City UT 84138

St. George UT

Phone: (435) 628-5514

Address: 285 West Tabernacle, St. George UT 84770

Ogden UT

Phone: (801) 392-9633

Fax: (801) 392-9630

Address: 324 25th Street, Ogden UT 84401

Mike Lee Staff
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Knese, Christy
Legislative Assistant
Freeman, Mike
Legislative Assistant
McKeon, Ryan
Legislative Assistant
McKeon, Ryan
Legislative Assistant
Hoyt, Trevor
Legislative Correspondent
Knese, Christy
Legislative Assistant
Freeman, Mike
Legislative Assistant
Hess, Jordan
Legislative Assistant
Hoyt, Trevor
Legislative Correspondent
Knese, Christy
Legislative Assistant
McMurray, Benji
Legislative Counsel
Owen, Matthew
General Counsel
Stewart, Sean
Legislative Correspondent
Baig, Wendy
Legislative Director
Moore, Robert
Legislative Assistant
McKeon, Ryan
Legislative Assistant
McKeon, Ryan
Legislative Assistant
Hess, Jordan
Legislative Assistant
Knese, Christy
Legislative Assistant
Freeman, Mike
Legislative Assistant
Freeman, Mike
Legislative Assistant
Hoyt, Trevor
Legislative Correspondent
Knese, Christy
Legislative Assistant
McKeon, Ryan
Legislative Assistant
Freeman, Mike
Legislative Assistant
Moore, Robert
Legislative Assistant
Blair, Peter
Legislative Assistant
Moore, Robert
Legislative Assistant
Blair, Peter
Legislative Assistant
Moore, Robert
Legislative Assistant
Stewart, Sean
Legislative Correspondent
Knese, Christy
Legislative Assistant
Moore, Robert
Legislative Assistant
Blair, Peter
Legislative Assistant
Freeman, Mike
Legislative Assistant
Hess, Jordan
Legislative Assistant
Stewart, Sean
Legislative Correspondent
Hoyt, Trevor
Legislative Correspondent
Knese, Christy
Legislative Assistant
Freeman, Mike
Legislative Assistant
Moore, Robert
Legislative Assistant
Burr, Benjamin
New Media Director
Knese, Christy
Legislative Assistant
McMurray, Benji
Legislative Counsel
Owen, Matthew
General Counsel
Stewart, Sean
Legislative Correspondent
Knese, Christy
Legislative Assistant
McMurray, Benji
Legislative Counsel
Owen, Matthew
General Counsel
Stewart, Sean
Legislative Correspondent
Knese, Christy
Legislative Assistant
Knese, Christy
Legislative Assistant
Knese, Christy
Legislative Assistant
Baig, Wendy
Legislative Director
Moore, Robert
Legislative Assistant
Freeman, Mike
Legislative Assistant
Knese, Christy
Legislative Assistant
Freeman, Mike
Legislative Assistant
Hess, Jordan
Legislative Assistant
McKeon, Ryan
Legislative Assistant
Hess, Jordan
Legislative Assistant
Knese, Christy
Legislative Assistant
Hoyt, Trevor
Legislative Correspondent
Hess, Jordan
Legislative Assistant
Burr, Benjamin
New Media Director
Hoyt, Trevor
Legislative Correspondent
McKeon, Ryan
Legislative Assistant
McKeon, Ryan
Legislative Assistant
Moore, Robert
Legislative Assistant
Hoyt, Trevor
Legislative Correspondent
Knese, Christy
Legislative Assistant
Freeman, Mike
Legislative Assistant
Blair, Peter
Legislative Assistant
Blair, Peter
Legislative Assistant
Freeman, Mike
Legislative Assistant
Baig, Wendy
Legislative Director
Blair, Peter
Legislative Assistant
Moore, Robert
Legislative Assistant
Hess, Jordan
Legislative Assistant
Arial, Bette
Southern Utah Director
Ashdown, Neil
Chief of Staff
Axson, Robert
Central Utah Area Director
Baig, Wendy
Legislative Director
Bell, Allyson
Administrative Director
Blair, Peter
Legislative Assistant
Brown, Derek
Deputy Chief of Staff; State Director
Burr, Benjamin
New Media Director
Connolly, Michael
Deputy Chief of Staff
Freeman, Mike
Legislative Assistant
Grinney, Matt
Communications Advisor
Hess, Jordan
Legislative Assistant
Hoyt, Trevor
Legislative Correspondent
Knese, Christy
Legislative Assistant
Lockhart, Hannah
Business Outreach Director; Constituent Services Representative
Long, Emily
Press Secretary; Scheduler
Matheson, Boyd
Senior Advisor
McKeon, Ryan
Legislative Assistant
McMurray, Benji
Legislative Counsel
Mero, Sally
Executive Assistant; State Scheduler
Moore, Robert
Legislative Assistant
Owen, Matthew
General Counsel
Patino, Linda
Staff Assistant
Phillips, Brian
Communications Director
Rich, Austin
Personal Assistant to the Senator
Sackett, Donna
Constituent Liaison
Stewart, Sean
Legislative Correspondent
Wilcox, Ryan
Northern Utah Area Director
Wiscombe, Emily
Constituent Liaison
Grinney, Matt
Communications Advisor
Matheson, Boyd
Senior Advisor
Ashdown, Neil
Chief of Staff
Phillips, Brian
Communications Director
McMurray, Benji
Legislative Counsel
Owen, Matthew
General Counsel
Brown, Derek
Deputy Chief of Staff; State Director
Connolly, Michael
Deputy Chief of Staff
Arial, Bette
Southern Utah Director
Axson, Robert
Central Utah Area Director
Bell, Allyson
Administrative Director
Brown, Derek
Deputy Chief of Staff; State Director
Burr, Benjamin
New Media Director
Lockhart, Hannah
Business Outreach Director; Constituent Services Representative
Wilcox, Ryan
Northern Utah Area Director
Mero, Sally
Executive Assistant; State Scheduler
Blair, Peter
Legislative Assistant
Freeman, Mike
Legislative Assistant
Hess, Jordan
Legislative Assistant
Knese, Christy
Legislative Assistant
McKeon, Ryan
Legislative Assistant
Moore, Robert
Legislative Assistant
Hoyt, Trevor
Legislative Correspondent
Stewart, Sean
Legislative Correspondent
Baig, Wendy
Legislative Director
Sackett, Donna
Constituent Liaison
Wiscombe, Emily
Constituent Liaison
Long, Emily
Press Secretary; Scheduler
Lockhart, Hannah
Business Outreach Director; Constituent Services Representative
Long, Emily
Press Secretary; Scheduler
Mero, Sally
Executive Assistant; State Scheduler
Patino, Linda
Staff Assistant
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Mike Lee Committees
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Mike Lee Biography
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  • Elected: 2010, term expires 2016, 1st term.
  • State: Utah
  • Born: Jun. 04, 1971, Mesa, AZ
  • Home: Alpine
  • Education:

    Brigham Young U., B.A. 1994, J.D. 1997.

  • Professional Career:

    Law clerk, Judge Samuel Alito, U.S. Court of Appeals, Third Circuit, 1998-99; Practicing atty., 1999-2002; Asst. U.S. atty., 2002-05; Gen. cnsl. Gov. Jon Huntsman, R-Utah., 2005-06; Law clerk, Supreme Court Justice Samuel Alito, 2006-07; practicing atty., 2007-10.

  • Ethnicity: White/Caucasian
  • Religion:

    Mormon

  • Family: Married (Sharon ); 3 children

Utah’s junior senator is Republican Mike Lee, who toppled 18-year Senate veteran Robert Bennett in Utah’s GOP convention in 2010 and went on to win the seat in the fall general election. With his deep interest in spreading his tea party-influenced views, Lee was called “the next Jim DeMint” even before the South Carolina conservative’s 2013 departure from the Senate. Read More

Utah’s junior senator is Republican Mike Lee, who toppled 18-year Senate veteran Robert Bennett in Utah’s GOP convention in 2010 and went on to win the seat in the fall general election. With his deep interest in spreading his tea party-influenced views, Lee was called “the next Jim DeMint” even before the South Carolina conservative’s 2013 departure from the Senate.

Lee grew up in Provo, where his father, Rex Lee, was the founding dean of Brigham Young University law school. He also lived part of the time in McLean, Va., when Rex Lee was an assistant attorney general from 1975 to 1976 and solicitor general from 1981 to 1985. Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., then a House member, was his Mormon (Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints) “home teacher” and he was schoolmates with children of Sen. Strom Thurmond, R-S.C., and Rep. Dick Gephardt, D-Mo. As a teenager, Lee remembers watching his father argue cases before the Supreme Court. “It took me a while before I realized it wasn’t entirely an ordinary experience to get to do that frequently,” he recalled.

Lee returned to Provo at age 14, and later entered Brigham Young University, where he ran for student body president on a platform that the university should end the practice of vetting candidates for student government. “There were a number of people who called me a radical because of that. It’s hardly radical to say students ought to be able to conduct their own elections,” he said. He graduated from college and law school at Brigham Young, and then served as a law clerk to District Judge Dee Benson in Utah and Third Circuit Appeals Court Judge Samuel Alito in New Jersey. He then practiced law in Washington, D.C. and in Utah. In 2005, he was appointed legal counsel to Republican Gov. Jon Huntsman and in 2006, after Alito was appointed to the U.S. Supreme Court, Lee returned to Washington to clerk for him once again.

Lee had joined a Utah law firm by the time the 2010 election rolled around. He said he decided to challenge Bennett after Congress passed the $700 billion bailout of the financial industry and President Barack Obama’s $787 billion stimulus bill. “The Republican Party had in so many ways deviated from what it professes,” he said. Bennett was in his third term and regarded as a solid conservative. But he had voted for the Troubled Asset Relief Program for the financial industry, and he had been a chief supporter of a bipartisan approach to health care legislation with Oregon Democrat Ron Wyden.

Bennett was endorsed by soon-to-be presidential candidate Mitt Romney and fellow Utah GOP Sen. Orrin Hatch. But to get on the primary ballot, he had to finish first or second at the Utah Republican convention in May 2010. In the meantime, Lee had caught the fancy of tea party activists, who were beginning to make inroads with their attacks on government spending and the expanded reach of government into the health care system. He was endorsed by DeMint, who was trying to influence the selection of a more conservative crop of GOP candidates in 2010.

At the convention, involving roughly 3,500 delegates from around the state, Bennett survived a first round of balloting, but was eliminated on the second round: Lee won 35% of the delegates; business consultant Tim Bridgewater came in first with 37 % and Bennett got 27%. The outcome ended Bennett’s 18-year Senate career. In a third round of voting, neither Lee nor Bridgewater met the 60% threshold to win outright, and as a result, the contest went to a primary election. Bennett endorsed Bridgewater in his one-on-one match-up with Lee. But Lee prevailed, 51%-49%. Of the state’s two most populous counties—Salt Lake and Utah—Bridgewater carried Salt Lake County, where relatively less-conservative voters live, but Lee won in Utah County. The general election was anticlimactic in this heavily Republican state; Lee beat Democrat Sam Granato, 62%-33%.

At age 38, Lee was the youngest senator when he took office in January 2011. One of his first moves was to introduce a bill in February for a balanced budget amendment that would require a two-thirds vote of both houses of Congress to override the limitation on spending. It did not go far in the Democratically-controlled Senate. Lee got some notice when he was one of the few Republicans to vote against extending the USA Patriot Act after expressing concern that it did not sufficiently protect civil liberties and privacy.

In 2011, Lee penned a book titled The Freedom Agenda: Why a Balanced Budget Amendment is Necessary to Restore Constitutional Government. During the summer 2011 standoff over raising the debt limit, he tried to push the balanced budget amendment as part of any deal. But the Senate eventually approved a plan with more modest deficit reduction. Lee voted against it. In December 2011, he and colleague Orrin Hatch, R-Utah. offered a balanced budget amendment that was voted down, 47-53. In May 2012, Lee offered a budget proposal to balance the budget in five years, implement a flat tax, and reform health care coverage. The Senate rejected it as well, 17-82. After Hurricane Sandy, Lee offered another amendment in January 2013 to cut federal programs across the board by .5% through 2021 as a way to prevent disaster aid from raising the debt; it failed 35-62.

He also jumped into the fray on judicial nominations. Outraged over President Obama’s four recess appointments, Lee voted in committee against Utah lawyer Robert Shelby for a federal judgeship in April 2012. He made it clear that he supported Shelby, but voted “no” as a protest against the recess appointments. Given Lee’s experience as a clerk for Alito, he was quite visible during the week of the challenge to the Obama health care law at the Supreme Court. Lee put out three YouTube videos related to the high court and health care.

With other conservative Republicans, he co-sponsored a bill declaring that the 14th Amendment’s birthright citizenship is limited to children of citizens, legal residents, and members of the military, and does not extend to illegal immigrants. But Lee has also pushed for loosening some immigration restrictions. He crossed party lines in an unusual alliance with Sen. Charles Schumer, D-N.Y. to push a visa reform bill that included helping foreigners who have invested at least $500,000 in a house in the United States. At Schumer’s behest, Lee took part in bipartisan talks on a comprehensive immigration reform bill in late 2012 and early 2013, but backed out and refused to sign the group’s draft giving immigrants a path to legal citizenship. “Reforms to our complex and dysfunctional immigration system should not in any way favor those who came here illegally over the millions of applicants who seek to come here lawfully,” he said.

On foreign policy, Lee has been less hawkish than some other conservatives. In a Senate Foreign Relations Committee vote in June 2011, Lee opposed a congressional resolution authorizing U.S. military involvement in Libya. He was the first GOP senator to join his Kentucky colleague Rand Paul during Paul’s 13-hour filibuster in March 2013 of John Brennan’s nomination to head the CIA in protest of the Obama administration’s potential use of unmanned drones to attack U.S. citizens. He formed an ideological kinship with Paul and freshman Texas Sen. Ted Cruz, another tea party favorite; they later said they would filibuster any attempt to bring gun-control legislation to the floor. The conservative National Review wrote, “At a time when the Republican Party, and the conservative moment in general, is still reeling from an electoral drubbing in November and lacks coherent leadership, the Paul-Lee-Cruz contingent is filling that void in a manner that is as savvy in its tactics as it is bold in its ambitions.”

Like DeMint, Lee has worked to elect other tea party-backed candidates. In 2012, he formed a political action committee to support like-minded conservative candidates. Lee was personally impacted by the housing slump. In May 2012, The Salt Lake Tribune reported that Lee was forced to short sell his $1.1 million home in Alpine at a much lower price.

Show Less
Mike Lee Election Results
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2010 General
Mike Lee (R)
Votes: 390,179
Percent: 61.56%
Spent: $1,710,429
Sam Granato
Votes: 207,685
Percent: 32.77%
Spent: $291,522
Scott Bradley
Votes: 35,937
Percent: 5.67%
2010 Primary
Mike Lee (R)
Votes: 98,512
Percent: 51.2%
Tim Bridgewater
Votes: 93,905
Percent: 48.8%
Mike Lee Votes and Bills
Back to top NJ Vote Ratings

National Journal’s rating system is an objective method of analyzing voting. The liberal score means that the lawmaker’s votes were more liberal than that percentage of his colleagues’ votes. The conservative score means his votes were more conservative than that percentage of his colleagues’ votes. The composite score is an average of a lawmaker’s six issue-based scores. See all NJ Voting

More Liberal
More Conservative
2013 2012 2011
Economic - (L) : 95 (C) 5 (L) : 93 (C) 26 (L) : 72 (C)
Social 23 (L) : 75 (C) 10 (L) : 87 (C) 12 (L) : 83 (C)
Foreign - (L) : 98 (C) 10 (L) : 85 (C) 22 (L) : 77 (C)
Composite 9.2 (L) : 90.8 (C) 10.0 (L) : 90.0 (C) 21.3 (L) : 78.7 (C)
Interest Group Ratings

The vote ratings by 10 special interest groups provide insight into a lawmaker’s general ideology and the degree to which he or she agrees with the group’s point of view. Two organizations provide just one combined rating for 2011 and 2012, the two sessions of the 112th Congress. They are the ACLU and the ITIC. About the interest groups.

20112012
FRC100100
LCV277
CFG100100
ITIC-50
NTU9398
20112012
COC73-
ACLU-25
ACU100100
ADA1010
AFSCME14-
Key Senate Votes

The key votes show how a member of Congress voted on the major bills of the year. N indicates a "no" vote; Y a "yes" vote. If a member voted "present" or was absent, the bill caption is not shown. For a complete description of the bills included in key votes, see the Almanac's Guide to Usage.

    • End fiscal cliff
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • Block faith exemptions
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • Approve gas pipeline
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Approve farm bill
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • Let cyber bill proceed
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • Block Gitmo transfers
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Raise debt limit
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Pass balanced budget amendment
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Stop EPA climate regulations
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Proceed to Cordray vote
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Require talking filibuster
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Limit Fannie/Freddie
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
Read More
Mike Lee Leadership Staff
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Chartan, Steve
Advisor, Policy
Chartan, Steve
Advisor, Policy
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The Almanac is a members-only database of searchable profiles compiled and adapted from the Almanac of American Politics. Comprehensive online profiles include biographical and political summaries of elected officials, campaign expenditures, voting records, interest-group ratings, and congressional staff look-ups. In-depth overviews of each state and house district are included as well, along with demographic data, analysis of voting trends, and political histories.
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