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Republican

Rep. Adam Kinzinger (R)

Adam Kinzinger Contact
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Email: n/a
DC Contact Information

Phone: 202-225-3635

Address: 1221 LHOB, DC 20515

State Office Contact Information

Phone: (815) 431-9271

Address: 628 Columbus Street, Ottawa IL 61350

Rockford IL

Phone: (815) 708-8032

Address: 725 North Lyford Road, Rockford IL 61107

Watseka IL

Phone: (815) 432-0580

Address: 342 West Walnut, Watseka IL 60970

Adam Kinzinger Staff
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Mackey, J.T.
Legislative Assistant
Mackey, J.T.
Legislative Assistant
Mackey, J.T.
Legislative Assistant
Baggett, Josh
Legislative Director
Mackey, J.T.
Legislative Assistant
Mackey, J.T.
Legislative Assistant
Mackey, J.T.
Legislative Assistant
Baggett, Josh
Legislative Director
Baggett, Josh
Legislative Director
Mackey, J.T.
Legislative Assistant
Mackey, J.T.
Legislative Assistant
Mackey, J.T.
Legislative Assistant
Baggett, Josh
Legislative Director
Baggett, Josh
Legislative Director
Mackey, J.T.
Legislative Assistant
Mackey, J.T.
Legislative Assistant
Mackey, J.T.
Legislative Assistant
Mackey, J.T.
Legislative Assistant
Baggett, Josh
Legislative Director
Mackey, J.T.
Legislative Assistant
Mackey, J.T.
Legislative Assistant
Mackey, J.T.
Legislative Assistant
Mackey, J.T.
Legislative Assistant
Baggett, Josh
Legislative Director
Mackey, J.T.
Legislative Assistant
Baggett, Josh
Legislative Director
Mackey, J.T.
Legislative Assistant
Mackey, J.T.
Legislative Assistant
Mackey, J.T.
Legislative Assistant
Mackey, J.T.
Legislative Assistant
Baggett, Josh
Legislative Director
Mackey, J.T.
Legislative Assistant
Mackey, J.T.
Legislative Assistant
Baggett, Josh
Legislative Director
Baggett, Josh
Legislative Director
Mackey, J.T.
Legislative Assistant
Baggett, Josh
Legislative Director
Mackey, J.T.
Legislative Assistant
Mackey, J.T.
Legislative Assistant
Baggett, Josh
Legislative Director
Czufin, Sarah
Legislative Correspondent
Doggett, Patrick
Field Representative
Edwards, Tamara
Scheduler; Press Assistant
Gatewood, Catherine
Communications Director
Gross, Matt
Office Manager; Scheduler
Mackey, J.T.
Legislative Assistant
Phalen, Luke
Field Representative
Ridenour, Greg
Field Representative
Walsh, Bonnie
District Director; Constituent Services Director
Walsh, John
Field Representative
Wilson, Reed
Deputy District Director
Gatewood, Catherine
Communications Director
Wilson, Reed
Deputy District Director
Walsh, Bonnie
District Director; Constituent Services Director
Mackey, J.T.
Legislative Assistant
Czufin, Sarah
Legislative Correspondent
Baggett, Josh
Legislative Director
Gross, Matt
Office Manager; Scheduler
Edwards, Tamara
Scheduler; Press Assistant
Doggett, Patrick
Field Representative
Phalen, Luke
Field Representative
Ridenour, Greg
Field Representative
Walsh, John
Field Representative
Edwards, Tamara
Scheduler; Press Assistant
Gross, Matt
Office Manager; Scheduler
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Adam Kinzinger Committees
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Adam Kinzinger Biography
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  • Elected: 2010, 2nd term.
  • District: Illinois 16
  • Born: Feb. 27, 1978, Kankakee
  • Home: Bloomington
  • Education:

    IL St. U., B.S. 2000.

  • Professional Career:

    Partner, sales rep., STL Technology, 2000-03.

  • Military Career:

    Air Natl. Guard, 2003-present (Iraq, Afghanistan).

  • Political Career:

    McLean Cnty. Bd., 1998-2003.

  • Ethnicity: White/Caucasian
  • Religion:

    Protestant

  • Family: Single

Republican Adam Kinzinger, elected in 2010, is a telegenic conservative just in his 30s who has racked up considerable experience in the military and political worlds. A former Air Force pilot, he dispatched first-term Democratic Rep. Debbie Halvorson, and then two years later, knocked off 10-term Republican Don Manzullo in a brutal Republican primary in 2012. Read More

Republican Adam Kinzinger, elected in 2010, is a telegenic conservative just in his 30s who has racked up considerable experience in the military and political worlds. A former Air Force pilot, he dispatched first-term Democratic Rep. Debbie Halvorson, and then two years later, knocked off 10-term Republican Don Manzullo in a brutal Republican primary in 2012.

Kinzinger was born in Kankakee, Ill., but spent the majority of his life in Bloomington, 70 miles to the southwest. He attributes his interest in public service to his father, who ran a nonprofit homeless shelter, and his mother, a public school teacher. He says that growing up in a middle-class family with two siblings taught him to spend money prudently. Wanting to stay near home, he attended Illinois State University and graduated with a bachelor’s degree in political science in 2000. His first foray into politics came before that: In 1998, as a college sophomore, he took seriously a joking suggestion that he run for the McLean County Board. He did, defeating an incumbent and serving until 2003. When the September 11 terrorist attacks occurred, “that’s when I basically woke up,” he recalled. A month later, he joined the Air Force. But he began working in the private sector for STL Technology Partners until he could begin officer and pilot training. He eventually served three tours in Iraq from 2007 to 2009 and a tour in Afghanistan.

In the summer of 2006, Kinzinger was returning from the border of Mexico as part of his mission when he saw an attempted murder. Seeing a woman whose throat had been slashed running from her knife-wielding aggressor, he wrestled the man to the ground until police arrived. As a result, he was awarded the National Guard’s Valley Forge Cross for heroism. “During that whole thing, I thought I was going to die,” he told National Journal. “It really was a life-changing moment about sacrificing yourself for others.”

In May 2009, after returning from his final tour in Iraq, Kinzinger began to campaign for the state’s 11th District seat. Touting his military service, he beat four opponents in the 2010 Republican primary, getting 64% of the vote. In the fall, he was up against Halvorson, who had racked up an impressive 58% of the vote in 2008. But Kinzinger went into the contest with important backing from local tea party activists.

Halvorson attacked Kinzinger’s stance on free trade and depicted him as inexperienced, running a campaign ad with a senior citizen scolding, “Young man, you have no idea what you’re doing.” Kinzinger countered with endorsements from former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin and former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney. He also won the support of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and the National Federation of Independent Business over Halvorson, a blow to an incumbent who had been known in Washington for her advocacy of small business. He also picked up an endorsement from the Chicago Sun-Times, which often backs Democrats. Kinzinger won convincingly, with 57% of the vote to 43% for Halvorson.

When he got to Washington, Kinzinger had his first brush with the national news media when The New York Times took him to task in a December 2010 editorial after Kinzinger held a $5,000-a-head breakfast at the Capitol Hill Club to raise money for his campaign debt. The editorial said it smacked of “business as usual” for a lawmaker who had promised to be different. But he became a favorite of House GOP leaders, who put him on the whip team and gave him a choice seat on the Energy and Commerce Committee, where he has generally upheld business’ interests. He has called for dramatically overhauling the tax code to make it friendlier to companies. He got a bill through the House in September 2012 aimed at helping states streamline certification requirements for veterans with emergency medical technician training who want to continue as civilian EMTs. Time named him as one of its “40 Under 40” young leaders.

For 2012, Democratic-engineered redistricting put Kinzinger in the same district as Manzullo, who is twice the age of his rival. The race upended the traditional rules of young versus old: Kinzinger won the endorsement of senior House GOP leaders, including Majority Leader Eric Cantor and Whip Kevin McCarthy, while Manzullo played up his tea party support and won the nod from FreedomWorks PAC, an important financial backer of that movement.

Kinzinger went on air touting his combat tours in Iraq and hit Manzullo for voting to raise the debt limit 12 times in his career. But Manzullo fired back effectively, boasting in an ad that he had voted to cut $209 billion more in spending than Kinzinger in the current session of Congress. Primary voters decided to go with youth over experience, and Kinzinger won 54%-46%. In the fall, he had no trouble, winning with 62% over Democrat Wanda Rohl.

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Adam Kinzinger Election Results
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2012 General
Adam Kinzinger (R)
Votes: 181,789
Percent: 61.81%
Wanda Rohl (D)
Votes: 112,301
Percent: 38.19%
2012 Primary
Adam Kinzinger (R)
Votes: 45,546
Percent: 53.94%
Donald Manzullo (R)
Votes: 38,889
Percent: 46.06%
Prior Winning Percentages
2010 (57%)
Adam Kinzinger Votes and Bills
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National Journal’s rating system is an objective method of analyzing voting. The liberal score means that the lawmaker’s votes were more liberal than that percentage of his colleagues’ votes. The conservative score means his votes were more conservative than that percentage of his colleagues’ votes. The composite score is an average of a lawmaker’s six issue-based scores. See all NJ Voting

More Liberal
More Conservative
2013 2012 2011
Economic 44 (L) : 56 (C) 36 (L) : 63 (C) 37 (L) : 60 (C)
Social 43 (L) : 54 (C) 50 (L) : 50 (C) 39 (L) : 58 (C)
Foreign 24 (L) : 68 (C) 43 (L) : 54 (C) 46 (L) : 53 (C)
Composite 38.8 (L) : 61.2 (C) 43.7 (L) : 56.3 (C) 41.8 (L) : 58.2 (C)
Interest Group Ratings

The vote ratings by 10 special interest groups provide insight into a lawmaker’s general ideology and the degree to which he or she agrees with the group’s point of view. Two organizations provide just one combined rating for 2011 and 2012, the two sessions of the 112th Congress. They are the ACLU and the ITIC. About the interest groups.

20112012
FRC9083
LCV116
CFG5657
ITIC-92
NTU6865
20112012
COC100-
ACLU-0
ACU7276
ADA155
AFSCME0-
Key House Votes

The key votes show how a member of Congress voted on the major bills of the year. N indicates a "no" vote; Y a "yes" vote. If a member voted "present" or was absent, the bill caption is not shown. For a complete description of the bills included in key votes, see the Almanac's Guide to Usage.

    • Pass GOP budget
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • End fiscal cliff
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Extend payroll tax cut
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Find AG in contempt
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Stop student loan hike
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Repeal health care
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Raise debt limit
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Pass cut, cap, balance
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Defund Planned Parenthood
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Repeal lightbulb ban
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Add endangered listings
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Speed troop withdrawal
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
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The Almanac is a members-only database of searchable profiles compiled and adapted from the Almanac of American Politics. Comprehensive online profiles include biographical and political summaries of elected officials, campaign expenditures, voting records, interest-group ratings, and congressional staff look-ups. In-depth overviews of each state and house district are included as well, along with demographic data, analysis of voting trends, and political histories.
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