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Republican

Rep. Mike Fitzpatrick (R)

Mike Fitzpatrick Contact
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Email: n/a
DC Contact Information

Phone: 202-225-4276

Address: 2400 RHOB, DC 20515

State Office Contact Information

Phone: (215) 579-8102

Address: 1717 Langhorne Newtown, Langhorne PA 19047-1086

Mike Fitzpatrick Staff
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Sort by INTEREST NAME TITLE
Rusk, Justin
Legislative Director
Hogan, Joe
Scheduler; Legislative Assistant
Hogan, Joe
Scheduler; Legislative Assistant
Rusk, Justin
Legislative Director
Nisivoccia, Anthony
Veterans and Military Advocate
Rusk, Justin
Legislative Director
Hogan, Joe
Scheduler; Legislative Assistant
Hogan, Joe
Scheduler; Legislative Assistant
Hogan, Joe
Scheduler; Legislative Assistant
Rusk, Justin
Legislative Director
Hogan, Joe
Scheduler; Legislative Assistant
Rusk, Justin
Legislative Director
Hogan, Joe
Scheduler; Legislative Assistant
Rusk, Justin
Legislative Director
Hogan, Joe
Scheduler; Legislative Assistant
Rusk, Justin
Legislative Director
Hogan, Joe
Scheduler; Legislative Assistant
Hogan, Joe
Scheduler; Legislative Assistant
Rusk, Justin
Legislative Director
Hogan, Joe
Scheduler; Legislative Assistant
Rusk, Justin
Legislative Director
Nisivoccia, Anthony
Veterans and Military Advocate
Rusk, Justin
Legislative Director
Hogan, Joe
Scheduler; Legislative Assistant
Rusk, Justin
Legislative Director
Rusk, Justin
Legislative Director
Rusk, Justin
Legislative Director
Hogan, Joe
Scheduler; Legislative Assistant
Nisivoccia, Anthony
Veterans and Military Advocate
Bolstein, Sam
Deputy District Director
Clark, Aaron
Press Secretary
DiMascia, Anna
Legislative Correspondent
Hogan, Joe
Scheduler; Legislative Assistant
McGinty, Kelly
Director of Constituent Services
Menta, Mallory
Constituent Services Advocate
Mulholland, Stacey
District Director; Economic Development Director
Nawalinski, Jennifer
District Office Manager
Nisivoccia, Anthony
Veterans and Military Advocate
Rusk, Justin
Legislative Director
Seiler, Gina
Constituent Advocate
Whatley, Kyle
Chief of Staff
Menta, Mallory
Constituent Services Advocate
Nisivoccia, Anthony
Veterans and Military Advocate
Seiler, Gina
Constituent Advocate
Whatley, Kyle
Chief of Staff
Bolstein, Sam
Deputy District Director
McGinty, Kelly
Director of Constituent Services
Mulholland, Stacey
District Director; Economic Development Director
Hogan, Joe
Scheduler; Legislative Assistant
DiMascia, Anna
Legislative Correspondent
Rusk, Justin
Legislative Director
Nawalinski, Jennifer
District Office Manager
Clark, Aaron
Press Secretary
Hogan, Joe
Scheduler; Legislative Assistant
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Mike Fitzpatrick Committees
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Mike Fitzpatrick Biography
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  • Elected: 2010, 4th term.
  • District: Pennsylvania 8
  • Born: Jun. 28, 1963, Philadelphia
  • Home: Levittown
  • Education:

    St. Thomas U., B.A. 1985; Dickinson Schl. of Law, J.D. 1988.

  • Professional Career:

    Practicing atty., 2007-10.

  • Political Career:

    Bucks Cnty. Commission, 1994-2004; U.S. House, 2005-07.

  • Ethnicity: White/Caucasian
  • Religion:

    Catholic

  • Family: Married (Kathleen); 6 children

Republican Mike Fitzpatrick was first elected in 2004, defeated in 2006, and elected again in 2010. Despite an occasional flirtation with tea party-inspired partisan rhetoric, his voting record is solidly in line with Pennsylvania’s other GOP moderates. A term-limits supporter, he announced in his 2014 victory speech that he would not run again. "There are many in Bucks County who want to serve and they should have the opportunity to do that," he said. Read More

Republican Mike Fitzpatrick was first elected in 2004, defeated in 2006, and elected again in 2010. Despite an occasional flirtation with tea party-inspired partisan rhetoric, his voting record is solidly in line with Pennsylvania’s other GOP moderates. A term-limits supporter, he announced in his 2014 victory speech that he would not run again. "There are many in Bucks County who want to serve and they should have the opportunity to do that," he said.

Fitzpatrick grew up in Bucks County’s Levittown, one of seven children. He was an Eagle Scout and graduated from St. Thomas University and Dickinson School of Law at Penn State University. From 1994 to 2004, he served on the Bucks County Commission, where he worked on land preservation and had a reputation for supporting environmental causes.

The House seat first came open when Rep. Jim Greenwood, a moderate Republican, announced in July 2004 that he would not seek reelection after accepting an offer to head the Biotechnology Industry Organization. However, Greenwood had already won the Republican primary, so local Republican leaders chose Fitzpatrick to replace him on the general election ballot. He went on to win 55%-43%.

In the House, he sponsored a successful bill requiring schools and libraries to restrict minors’ access to social networking sites and chat rooms. Fitzpatrick was the Pennsylvania delegation’s most liberal Republican in the 112th Congress (2011-12), according to National Journal rankings. In 2013, he was more liberal than all but three House GOP lawmakers.

He and now-retired Rep. Todd Platts were the only two Keystone State Republicans in 2012 to oppose a House-passed bill that replaced automatic spending cuts with targeted reductions aimed at decreasing eligibility for food stamps and eliminating programs created in the 2010 health care law. The House passed his bill that year to overturn President Barack Obama’s executive order giving an across-the-board pay hike to members of Congress and some federal workers. He also got a measure into law to extend death benefits to the families of emergency service workers for non-profit organizations.

But some of his statements have ignited criticism. He suggested at an April 2012 fundraiser that Obama would have the power to “trade away … the secrets of our national intelligence” if reelected. Democrats also condemned a remark he made that September to a tea party group. He said, “We need to support people who have a history and know what it is like to sign the front of a paycheck, not the back of a paycheck.”

In his first bid for reelection in 2006, Fitzpatrick was challenged by Democrat Patrick Murphy, the son of a Philadelphia policeman and an Army lawyer and Iraq war veteran. Murphy favored an end to the war at a time antiwar sentiments were running high. Fitzpatrick tried to distance himself from the Bush administration’s policies in Iraq. When Fitzpatrick ran an ad questioning Murphy’s claim that he had worked as a Justice Department prosecutor, Murphy declared at a forum, “Mike, you are a liar and a coward.” Murphy won 50.3%-49.7%, with a vote margin of 1,518 votes out of almost 250,000 votes cast.

Fitzpatrick returned to private law practice. He was later diagnosed with colon cancer; after treatment, doctors gave him a clean bill of health in 2010. That year was shaping up to be a favorable political climate for Republicans, and Fitzpatrick decided to try to get the seat back. In the GOP primary, he faced three opponents and was viewed as the establishment candidate, endorsed by The Philadelphia Inquirer. He was embarrassed, however, by a comment he made about primary opponent Gloria Carlineo, whom he called an “immigrant,” even though she hails from Puerto Rico. Fitzpatrick later said he meant the comment as a compliment in the sense that she is living the American dream. Still, Fitzpatrick won the primary with 77% of the vote.

In the general election, Fitzpatrick emphasized not the environmental issues he had in the past, but his opposition to the Obama administration. “Cash for clunkers, Obamacare, stimulus—no jobs. We’ve wasted a lot of money in the last few years,” he told The New York Times. Like many Democrats in 2010, Murphy emphasized his support for allowing the Bush-era tax cuts to expire for high-income earners while extending them for other taxpayers. Murphy also attacked Fitzpatrick for “Fitzflops”—formerly cosponsoring and now opposing a bill making it easier to organize labor unions, and formerly bragging about being one of the House’s most liberal Republicans but now campaigning as a tea partier.

Murphy was a favorite of many Democratic insiders who hoped that, at age 37, he might someday be a statewide candidate. He had also raised his profile as the leader in the House effort to repeal the ban on openly gay service personnel in the military. Murphy spent $4.3 million, more than twice the $2 million Fitzpatrick spent. Nonetheless, Fitzpatrick won by a decisive 54%-46%.

In 2012, his Democratic opponent was attorney Kathy Boockvar. The National Republican Congressional Committee landed in hot water by launching an online ad and robo-call tying Boockvar to the controversial movement to free convicted cop-killer Mumia Abu-Jamal. Her husband had once done legal work for a witness who recanted her testimony in the case. That led former Democratic Gov. Ed Rendell, still a popular figure in the area, to condemn Fitzpatrick. But the incumbent outraised her by nearly 2-to-1 and won, 57%-43%.

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Mike Fitzpatrick Election Results
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2012 General
Michael Fitzpatrick (R)
Votes: 199,379
Percent: 56.6%
Kathy Boockvar (D)
Votes: 152,859
Percent: 43.4%
2012 Primary
Michael Fitzpatrick (R)
Votes: 42,935
Percent: 100.0%
Prior Winning Percentages
2010 (54%), 2004 (55%)
Mike Fitzpatrick Votes and Bills
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National Journal’s rating system is an objective method of analyzing voting. The liberal score means that the lawmaker’s votes were more liberal than that percentage of his colleagues’ votes. The conservative score means his votes were more conservative than that percentage of his colleagues’ votes. The composite score is an average of a lawmaker’s six issue-based scores. See all NJ Voting

More Liberal
More Conservative
2013 2012 2011
Economic 53 (L) : 47 (C) 54 (L) : 45 (C) 51 (L) : 49 (C)
Social 51 (L) : 48 (C) 44 (L) : 55 (C) 52 (L) : 48 (C)
Foreign 50 (L) : 50 (C) 53 (L) : 47 (C) 54 (L) : 46 (C)
Composite 51.5 (L) : 48.5 (C) 50.7 (L) : 49.3 (C) 52.3 (L) : 47.7 (C)
Interest Group Ratings

The vote ratings by 10 special interest groups provide insight into a lawmaker’s general ideology and the degree to which he or she agrees with the group’s point of view. Two organizations provide just one combined rating for 2011 and 2012, the two sessions of the 112th Congress. They are the ACLU and the ITIC. About the interest groups.

20112012
FRC90100
LCV4646
CFG4358
ITIC-100
NTU6762
20112012
COC100-
ACLU-23
ACU6452
ADA2010
AFSCME14-
Key House Votes

The key votes show how a member of Congress voted on the major bills of the year. N indicates a "no" vote; Y a "yes" vote. If a member voted "present" or was absent, the bill caption is not shown. For a complete description of the bills included in key votes, see the Almanac's Guide to Usage.

    • Pass GOP budget
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • End fiscal cliff
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Extend payroll tax cut
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Find AG in contempt
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Stop student loan hike
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Repeal health care
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Raise debt limit
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Pass cut, cap, balance
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Defund Planned Parenthood
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Repeal lightbulb ban
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Add endangered listings
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Speed troop withdrawal
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
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The Almanac is a members-only database of searchable profiles compiled and adapted from the Almanac of American Politics. Comprehensive online profiles include biographical and political summaries of elected officials, campaign expenditures, voting records, interest-group ratings, and congressional staff look-ups. In-depth overviews of each state and house district are included as well, along with demographic data, analysis of voting trends, and political histories.
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