Skip Navigation

Close and don't show again.

Your browser is out of date.

You may not get the full experience here on National Journal.

Please upgrade your browser to any of the following supported browsers:

Phil Gingrey Phil Gingrey

NEXT :
This ad will end in seconds
 
Close X

Want access to this content? Learn More »

Forget Your Password?

Don't have an account? Register »

Reveal Navigation
 

 

Almanac

Search

Enter your search query or use our Advanced People Search. Need Help? View our search tips

View Saved Lists
View Saved Lists
Republican

Rep. Phil Gingrey (R)

Phil Gingrey Contact
Back to top
Email: n/a
DC Contact Information

Phone: 202-225-2931

Address: 442 CHOB, DC 20515

Phil Gingrey Committees
Back to top
Phil Gingrey Biography
Back to top
  • Elected: 2002, 6th term.
  • District: Georgia 11
  • Born: Jul. 10, 1942, Augusta
  • Home: Marietta
  • Education:

    GA Inst. of Tech., B.S. 1965, Med. Col. of GA, M.D. 1969

  • Professional Career:

    Practicing obstetrician, 1976-present.

  • Political Career:

    Marietta Schl. Bd., 1993-97; GA Senate, 1998-2002.

  • Religion:

    Catholic

  • Family: Married (Billie); 4 children

Republican Phil Gingrey, first electedin 2002, is an obstetrician who co-chairs the GOP Doctors’ Caucus and focuses on health care. One of the House’s most conservative members, he had hoped his right-wing views could help him win a U.S. Senate seat, but he came in a distant fourth in a seven-candidate primary in May 2014. Read More

Republican Phil Gingrey, first electedin 2002, is an obstetrician who co-chairs the GOP Doctors’ Caucus and focuses on health care. One of the House’s most conservative members, he had hoped his right-wing views could help him win a U.S. Senate seat, but he came in a distant fourth in a seven-candidate primary in May 2014.

Gingrey grew up in Augusta, graduated from Georgia Tech, and returned home to attend the Medical College of Georgia. After training in Georgia hospitals, he settled in Marietta, where he set up an obstetrics and gynecology practice. He also chaired the local school board. In 1998, he was elected to the state Senate, where he had a reputation as a staunch social conservative who could work with Democrats on other issues. Gingrey says the book that most influenced his political thinking is Barry Goldwater’s classic The Conscience of a Conservative.

In the contest for the U.S. House seat, Gingrey faced tough competition in both the primary and general election. The issue differences were small among the three candidates in the Republican primary. Gingrey styled himself as the only native Georgian. Cecil Staton, an ordained Baptist minister, vowed to view all legislation from the perspective of the traditional family. Gingrey won 40% of the vote to 32% for Staton and 28% for Bob Herriott, a pilot for Delta Airlines.

The bitter September runoff revolved around allegations by Staton that Gingrey supported homosexual causes. Voters who knew Gingrey from his state Senate tenure didn’t buy it. He won 64%-36%, carrying every county. The Democrats, meanwhile, nominated Roger Kahn, a millionaire beer distributor who spent $2.8 million from his own pocket. Gingrey spent $600,000 of his own money. With a boost from the Georgia Republican tide that year, Gingrey won 52%-48%.

In the House, Gingrey was among the first to join the Tea Party Caucus in 2010; he tied for most conservative House member in National Journal’s 2011 rankings. He opposed the New Year’s Day 2013 budget deal on taxes and spending cuts, aimed at averting the so-called fiscal cliff, because he said it would hurt small business with tax hikes.

A member of the Energy and Commerce Committee, he has harshly criticized President Barack Obama’s health care law, calling it “disastrous and un-American,” and urging that it be replaced with state-based reforms. At a July 2011 committee hearing, he brought in a poster comparing Medicare administrator Don Berwick to Godfather movie mobster Don Corleone for saying that it was up to leaders, not consumers, to enforce the new health care system.

Gingrey has taken up the cause of business interests on other legislation before the committee. It passed his bill in August 2012 to enable farmers to use methyl bromide, which has been phased out because it destroys the ozone layer, as a pesticide where no alternative is available. He did work in a bipartisan way with Colorado Democrat Diana DeGette to include a provision in a 2012 Food and Drug and Administration bill to spur the development of new drugs to treat antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections.

Gingrey’s outspokenness has landed him some unwanted headlines. He attempted in January 2013 to clarify ex-Missouri Rep. Todd Akin’s incendiary comments about “legitimate rape”—which were widely credited with ending Akin’s chances for the Senate in 2012—by telling the Marietta Daily News that Akin “was partially right.” He said, “I’ve delivered lots of babies, and I know about these things.” Akin had kicked off the controversy by asserting that a woman’s body had a way of blocking an unwanted pregnancy resulting from a “legitimate rape.”

Gingrey quite unexpectedly found himself on the wrong side of some of the nation’s best known conservatives in 2009 when he told Politico in offhand remarks, “It’s easy if you’re Sean Hannity or Rush Limbaugh or even sometimes Newt Gingrich to stand back and throw rocks.” His sentiments may have resonated with other office holders, but he wound up apologizing to the pundits the next day, praising Limbaugh as a “conservative giant,” and adding, “I regret those stupid comments.” He dominated more headlines in early 2011 when, after touring the U.S.-Mexico border, he said: “If I had to choose from immigrants across the globe, my favorite alien would be our Hispanic and Latino residents coming from across the Southern border.”

In 2005, Gingrey tried but failed to get a seat on the powerful Ways and Means Committee and instead was given a seat on the Rules Committee, an influential panel that writes the rules for bringing bills to the floor. The following year, Gingrey lost a bid for the chairmanship of the Republican Policy Committee, which is part of the GOP leadership. When Democrats took control of the House in 2007, he had to give up his seat on Rules, and he shifted his focus to the Armed Services Committee, where he was an avid booster of Lockheed’s Marietta plant in his district.

Democrats claimed they would seriously contest Gingrey’s seat in 2004, but he had an easier than expected reelection. He raised $2.3 million, much of it from the medical community. His opponent, conservative Democrat Rick Crawford, failed to impress national Democrats. Gingrey won 57%-43% and has not had a problem getting reelected since. He was unopposed in 2010 and won with 69% in 2012.

When GOP Sen. Saxby Chambliss announced that he wouldn't see a third term, Gingrey was regarded as a strong contender for the seat, and a February poll showed him as the frontrunner. But he couldn't compete financially with his Georgia colleague Jack Kingston or business executive Sonny Perdue, and in the May primary took just 10 percent of the vote behind Perdue (who eventually won the runoff), Kingston and former Secretary of State Karen Handel.

Show Less
Phil Gingrey Election Results
Back to top
2012 General
Phil Gingrey (R)
Votes: 196,968
Percent: 68.55%
Patrick Thompson (D)
Votes: 90,353
Percent: 31.45%
2012 Primary
Phil Gingrey (R)
Votes: 75,697
Percent: 80.93%
Michael Opitz (R)
Votes: 9,231
Percent: 9.87%
William Llop (R)
Votes: 8,604
Percent: 9.2%
Prior Winning Percentages
2010 (unopposed), 2008 (68%), 2006 (71%), 2004 (57%), 2002 (52%)
Phil Gingrey Votes and Bills
Back to top NJ Vote Ratings

National Journal’s rating system is an objective method of analyzing voting. The liberal score means that the lawmaker’s votes were more liberal than that percentage of his colleagues’ votes. The conservative score means his votes were more conservative than that percentage of his colleagues’ votes. The composite score is an average of a lawmaker’s six issue-based scores. See all NJ Voting

More Liberal
More Conservative
2013 2012 2011
Economic 18 (L) : 82 (C) 13 (L) : 86 (C) - (L) : 90 (C)
Social - (L) : 87 (C) - (L) : 91 (C) - (L) : 83 (C)
Foreign 5 (L) : 86 (C) 27 (L) : 72 (C) - (L) : 91 (C)
Composite 11.3 (L) : 88.7 (C) 15.2 (L) : 84.8 (C) 6.0 (L) : 94.0 (C)
Interest Group Ratings

The vote ratings by 10 special interest groups provide insight into a lawmaker’s general ideology and the degree to which he or she agrees with the group’s point of view. Two organizations provide just one combined rating for 2011 and 2012, the two sessions of the 112th Congress. They are the ACLU and the ITIC. About the interest groups.

20112012
FRC9066
LCV96
CFG9289
ITIC-73
NTU8182
20112012
COC93-
ACLU-0
ACU10096
ADA00
AFSCME0-
Key House Votes

The key votes show how a member of Congress voted on the major bills of the year. N indicates a "no" vote; Y a "yes" vote. If a member voted "present" or was absent, the bill caption is not shown. For a complete description of the bills included in key votes, see the Almanac's Guide to Usage.

    • Pass GOP budget
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • End fiscal cliff
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • Extend payroll tax cut
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • Find AG in contempt
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Stop student loan hike
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Repeal health care
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Raise debt limit
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Pass cut, cap, balance
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Defund Planned Parenthood
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Repeal lightbulb ban
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Add endangered listings
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Speed troop withdrawal
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Regulate financial firms
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2010
    • Pass tax cuts for some
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2010
    • Stop detainee transfers
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2010
    • Legalize immigrants' kids
    • Vote:
    • Year: 2010
    • Repeal don't ask, tell
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2010
    • Limit campaign funds
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2010
    • Overturn Ledbetter
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Pass $820 billion stimulus
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Let guns in national parks
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Pass cap-and-trade
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Bar federal abortion funds
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Pass health care bill
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Bail out financial markets
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2008
    • Repeal D.C. gun law
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2008
    • Overhaul FISA
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2008
    • Increase minimum wage
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • Expand SCHIP
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • Raise CAFE standards
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • Share immigration data
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
    • Foreign aid abortion ban
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
    • Ban gay bias in workplace
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • Withdraw troops 8/08
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • No operations in Iran
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • Free trade with Peru
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
Read More
 
Browse The Almanac
Congressional Leadership
and Committees

House Committees
Senate Committees
Joint Committees
Leadership Roster
About Almanac
almanac cover
The Almanac is a members-only database of searchable profiles compiled and adapted from the Almanac of American Politics. Comprehensive online profiles include biographical and political summaries of elected officials, campaign expenditures, voting records, interest-group ratings, and congressional staff look-ups. In-depth overviews of each state and house district are included as well, along with demographic data, analysis of voting trends, and political histories.
Members: Buy the book at 25% off retail.
Order Now
Need Help?

Contact Us:

202.266.7900 | membership@nationaljournal.com