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Republican

Rep. Steve Chabot (R)

Steve Chabot Contact
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Email: n/a
DC Contact Information

Phone: 202-225-2216

Address: 2371 RHOB, DC 20515

State Office Contact Information

Phone: (513) 684-2723

Address: 441 Vine Street, Cincinnati OH 45202-3003

Lebanon OH

Phone: (513) 421-8704

Fax: (513) 421-8722

Address: 11 South Broad Way, Lebanon OH 45036-1769

Steve Chabot Staff
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Sort by INTEREST NAME TITLE
Hess, Chris
Legislative Assistant
Hess, Chris
Legislative Assistant
Heim, Alyssa
Deputy District Director
McCandless, David
Constituent Liaison
Hess, Chris
Legislative Assistant
Hess, Chris
Legislative Assistant
Hess, Chris
Legislative Assistant
Moore, Katelyn
Executive Assistant
Bill, Aaron
Legislative Counsel
Heim, Alyssa
Deputy District Director
Koepke, Priscilla
Legislative Director
Hess, Chris
Legislative Assistant
Abner, Joe
Office Manager
Hess, Chris
Legislative Assistant
Moore, Katelyn
Executive Assistant
Abner, Joe
Office Manager
Abner, Joe
Office Manager
McCandless, David
Constituent Liaison
McCandless, David
Constituent Liaison
Bill, Aaron
Legislative Counsel
Heim, Alyssa
Deputy District Director
McCandless, David
Constituent Liaison
Hess, Chris
Legislative Assistant
Abner, Joe
Office Manager
Abner, Joe
Office Manager
McCandless, David
Constituent Liaison
Abner, Joe
Office Manager
Bill, Aaron
Legislative Counsel
Heim, Alyssa
Deputy District Director
Koepke, Priscilla
Legislative Director
Hess, Chris
Legislative Assistant
Hess, Chris
Legislative Assistant
McCandless, David
Constituent Liaison
Abner, Joe
Office Manager
Bill, Aaron
Legislative Counsel
Cantwell, Michael
District Director
Gaide, Erin
Staff Assistant
Garlock, Emily
Staff Assistant
Griffith, Brian
Communications Director
Heim, Alyssa
Deputy District Director
Hess, Chris
Legislative Assistant
Koepke, Priscilla
Legislative Director
Lowe, Jonathan
Legislative Correspondent
McCandless, David
Constituent Liaison
Moore, Katelyn
Executive Assistant
Wellman, Mark
Chief of Staff
Wellman, Mark
Chief of Staff
Griffith, Brian
Communications Director
Bill, Aaron
Legislative Counsel
Heim, Alyssa
Deputy District Director
Cantwell, Michael
District Director
Moore, Katelyn
Executive Assistant
Hess, Chris
Legislative Assistant
Lowe, Jonathan
Legislative Correspondent
Koepke, Priscilla
Legislative Director
McCandless, David
Constituent Liaison
Abner, Joe
Office Manager
Gaide, Erin
Staff Assistant
Garlock, Emily
Staff Assistant
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Steve Chabot Committees
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Steve Chabot Biography
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  • Elected: 2010, 10th term.
  • District: Ohio 1
  • Born: Jan. 22, 1953, Cincinnati
  • Home: Cincinnati
  • Education:

    Col. of William & Mary, B.A. 1975; Northern KY U., J.D. 1978.

  • Professional Career:

    Teacher, St. Joseph Schl., 1975-76; Practicing atty., 1978-94.

  • Political Career:

    Cincinnati City Cncl., 1985-90; Hamilton Cnty. Commission, 1990-94; U.S. House, 1995-2009.

  • Ethnicity: White/Caucasian
  • Religion:

    Catholic

  • Family: Married (Donna); 2 children

Republican Steve Chabot first came to the House as part of the historic GOP Class of 1994 and served 14 years before losing his seat to Democrat Steve Driehaus. He got it back by beating Driehaus in 2010, and he reclaimed his status as one of the chamber’s most conservative members. He became Small Business Committee chairman in 2015. Read More

Republican Steve Chabot first came to the House as part of the historic GOP Class of 1994 and served 14 years before losing his seat to Democrat Steve Driehaus. He got it back by beating Driehaus in 2010, and he reclaimed his status as one of the chamber’s most conservative members. He became Small Business Committee chairman in 2015.

Chabot (SHAB-bit) grew up in the Cincinnati area and graduated from La Salle High School, where he says he “got the bug” for politics after serving on the student council. Then came the Watergate scandal. “A lot of people my age got turned off from politics because of all that,” Chabot said in an interview with National Journal. “I wasn’t that way. I thought we needed honest people in government.” He went on to earn a degree in history and physical education from the College of William & Mary. He then took night classes at Northern Kentucky University while teaching at an elementary school during the day. Chabot won a seat on the Cincinnati City Council, where he served for four years. He followed that with a four-year stint on the Hamilton County Commission. During that time, Chabot said, he tried to find innovative ways to reduce the cost of government, such as using jail inmates for some public services.

In 1994, he was among the conservative Republicans who successfully ran for Congress and ended 40 years of Democratic control of the House. In his 14 years on Capitol Hill, Chabot took principled and politically risky stands opposing federal spending on projects in his district and was a leader on social issues, particularly opposition to abortion rights. In 2003, he helped enact a ban on “partial-birth” abortions, and he also pushed a bill to prevent minors from crossing state lines to get abortions. Chabot was a House manager during the 1998 impeachment of President Bill Clinton. In retrospect, Chabot said, he is most proud of his work in fighting wasteful spending.

Chabot lost his seat in 2008, when Driehaus defeated him by 5 percentage points. He had been spoiling for a rematch since. In the 2010 campaign, Chabot criticized the incumbent for voting with the Democratic majority on President Barack Obama’s health care initiative and the $787 billion economic-stimulus package. For his part, Driehaus defended the work that Democrats have done during the first two years of the Obama administration, including the health care overhaul, which he called “the right thing” to do. On the stump, he asked voters to give Obama and the Democrats more time to implement change. But Driehaus had trouble generating much voter excitement for his reelection, and in October, the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee pulled the plug on further spending on television ads for him. Both candidates raised about $2 million each. Chabot won, 52% to 46%.

With Republican Sam Graves of Missouri term-limited as Small Business' chairman, Chabot played up his conservative bona fides to succeed Graves. "If there's one thing government can do for small business, it's to get the heck off their backs," Chabot told the Associated Press. In addition to scrutinizing the Internal Revenue Service and Environmental Protection Agency, he said he would try to streamline the Small Business Agency's lending process. "It's cumbersome, it takes too long, there's far too much paperwork. It just intimidates a lot of people," he said

When he initially returned to the House, Chabot was able to use his seniority to claim the chairmanship of a Foreign Affairs subcommittee focusing on the Middle East and South Asia. He became a critic of the Obama administration’s policies in the region and called its explanation of events before and after the deadly September 2012 attack at the U.S. embassy in Benghazi, Libya “ham-handed at best and a cover-up at worst.” He introduced a bill in 2012 to revamp the Section 8 housing initiative for low-income residents, calling it “a broken program that rewards dependency on government with our tax dollars.” He also crusaded against federal funding of Cincinnati’s streetcar project on economic grounds.

But he drew the most attention in August 2011, when his staff ordered police to seize the cameras of two Democratic activists who were videotaping one of Chabot’s town hall meetings. After an outpouring of criticism from across the political spectrum—tea party leader Judson Phillips called Chabot a “moron”— he allowed taping of subsequent events.

Ohio Republicans, in post-2010 census redistricting, made the 1st District substantially more Republican, and Chabot won reelection in 2012 by beating Democrat Jeff Sinnard, 58%-37%, with two minor-party candidates splitting the remainder. “Unless Steve Chabot commits a felony, he will be there for as long as he wants to be,” Hamilton County Democratic Party Chairman Tim Burke lamented to The Cincinnati Enquirer.

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Steve Chabot Election Results
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2012 General
Steve Chabot (R)
Votes: 201,907
Percent: 57.73%
Jeff Sinnard (D)
Votes: 131,490
Percent: 37.6%
Jim Berns
Votes: 9,674
Percent: 2.77%
2012 Primary
Steve Chabot (R)
Votes: 57,496
Percent: 100.0%
Prior Winning Percentages
2010 (51%), 2006 (52%), 2004 (60%), 2002 (65%), 2000 (53%), 1998 (53%), 1996 (54%), 1994 (56%)
Steve Chabot Votes and Bills
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National Journal’s rating system is an objective method of analyzing voting. The liberal score means that the lawmaker’s votes were more liberal than that percentage of his colleagues’ votes. The conservative score means his votes were more conservative than that percentage of his colleagues’ votes. The composite score is an average of a lawmaker’s six issue-based scores. See all NJ Voting

More Liberal
More Conservative
2013 2012 2011
Economic - (L) : 98 (C) - (L) : 99 (C) - (L) : 90 (C)
Social - (L) : 87 (C) - (L) : 91 (C) 17 (L) : 74 (C)
Foreign - (L) : 95 (C) 16 (L) : 81 (C) - (L) : 91 (C)
Composite 3.3 (L) : 96.7 (C) 7.5 (L) : 92.5 (C) 10.3 (L) : 89.7 (C)
Interest Group Ratings

The vote ratings by 10 special interest groups provide insight into a lawmaker’s general ideology and the degree to which he or she agrees with the group’s point of view. Two organizations provide just one combined rating for 2011 and 2012, the two sessions of the 112th Congress. They are the ACLU and the ITIC. About the interest groups.

20112012
FRC100100
LCV614
CFG9388
ITIC-75
NTU8585
20112012
COC100-
ACLU-0
ACU9696
ADA010
AFSCME0-
Key House Votes

The key votes show how a member of Congress voted on the major bills of the year. N indicates a "no" vote; Y a "yes" vote. If a member voted "present" or was absent, the bill caption is not shown. For a complete description of the bills included in key votes, see the Almanac's Guide to Usage.

    • Pass GOP budget
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • End fiscal cliff
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • Extend payroll tax cut
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • Find AG in contempt
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Stop student loan hike
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Repeal health care
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Raise debt limit
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Pass cut, cap, balance
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Defund Planned Parenthood
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Repeal lightbulb ban
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Add endangered listings
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Speed troop withdrawal
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
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The Almanac is a members-only database of searchable profiles compiled and adapted from the Almanac of American Politics. Comprehensive online profiles include biographical and political summaries of elected officials, campaign expenditures, voting records, interest-group ratings, and congressional staff look-ups. In-depth overviews of each state and house district are included as well, along with demographic data, analysis of voting trends, and political histories.
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