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Democrat

Sen. Richard Blumenthal (D)

Richard Blumenthal Contact
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Email: n/a
DC Contact Information

Phone: 202-224-2823

Address: 702 HSOB, DC 20510

State Office Contact Information

Phone: (860) 258-6940

Address: 90 State House Square, Hartford CT 06103

Bridgeport CT

Phone: (203) 330-0598

Fax: (203) 330-0608

Address: 915 Lafayette Boulevard, Bridgeport CT 06604

Richard Blumenthal Staff
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Lane, Khaliyl
Legislative Correspondent
Jee, Lauren
Legislative Assistant
Simon, Sam
Senior Counsel
Toppin, E.J.
Legislative Aide
Jee, Lauren
Legislative Assistant
Jee, Lauren
Legislative Assistant
Yu, Anna
Legislative Assistant
Simon, Sam
Senior Counsel
Conley, Alicia
Correspondence Manager
Kelsey, Joel
Legislative Assistant
Simon, Sam
Senior Counsel
Jee, Lauren
Legislative Assistant
Lane, Khaliyl
Legislative Correspondent
Kelsey, Joel
Legislative Assistant
Simon, Sam
Senior Counsel
Yu, Anna
Legislative Assistant
Saxon, Ethan
Legislative Director
Bell, Don
Legislative Correspondent
Saxon, Ethan
Legislative Director
Lane, Khaliyl
Legislative Correspondent
Simon, Sam
Senior Counsel
Simon, Sam
Senior Counsel
Jee, Lauren
Legislative Assistant
Toppin, E.J.
Legislative Aide
Yu, Anna
Legislative Assistant
Toppin, E.J.
Legislative Aide
Yu, Anna
Legislative Assistant
Simon, Sam
Senior Counsel
Jee, Lauren
Legislative Assistant
Lane, Khaliyl
Legislative Correspondent
Simon, Sam
Senior Counsel
Jee, Lauren
Legislative Assistant
Yu, Anna
Legislative Assistant
Saxon, Ethan
Legislative Director
Lane, Khaliyl
Legislative Correspondent
Lane, Khaliyl
Legislative Correspondent
Simon, Sam
Senior Counsel
Jee, Lauren
Legislative Assistant
Parikh, Shivani
Legislative Correspondent
Saxon, Ethan
Legislative Director
Simon, Sam
Senior Counsel
Conley, Alicia
Correspondence Manager
Simon, Sam
Senior Counsel
Simon, Sam
Senior Counsel
Saxon, Ethan
Legislative Director
Saxon, Ethan
Legislative Director
Kelsey, Joel
Legislative Assistant
Lane, Khaliyl
Legislative Correspondent
Simon, Sam
Senior Counsel
Bell, Don
Legislative Correspondent
Lane, Khaliyl
Legislative Correspondent
Simon, Sam
Senior Counsel
Bell, Don
Legislative Correspondent
Jee, Lauren
Legislative Assistant
Jee, Lauren
Legislative Assistant
Jee, Lauren
Legislative Assistant
Parikh, Shivani
Legislative Correspondent
Saxon, Ethan
Legislative Director
Casanova, Robert
Office Manager; Deputy Scheduler; Legislative Correspondent
Toppin, E.J.
Legislative Aide
Yu, Anna
Legislative Assistant
Lane, Khaliyl
Legislative Correspondent
Simon, Sam
Senior Counsel
Simon, Sam
Senior Counsel
Simon, Sam
Senior Counsel
Toppin, E.J.
Legislative Aide
Jee, Lauren
Legislative Assistant
Simon, Sam
Senior Counsel
Jee, Lauren
Legislative Assistant
Lane, Khaliyl
Legislative Correspondent
Kelsey, Joel
Legislative Assistant
Lane, Khaliyl
Legislative Correspondent
Simon, Sam
Senior Counsel
Toppin, E.J.
Legislative Aide
Kelsey, Joel
Legislative Assistant
Kelsey, Joel
Legislative Assistant
Yu, Anna
Legislative Assistant
Saxon, Ethan
Legislative Director
Simon, Sam
Senior Counsel
Toppin, E.J.
Legislative Aide
Yu, Anna
Legislative Assistant
Toppin, E.J.
Legislative Aide
Yu, Anna
Legislative Assistant
Saxon, Ethan
Legislative Director
Jee, Lauren
Legislative Assistant
Lane, Khaliyl
Legislative Correspondent
Allen, Tom
Scheduling Assistant
Bell, Don
Legislative Correspondent
Benton, Elizabeth
State Communications Director
Botero, Gabriel
Research Aide; Outreach Organizer
Bradnan, Ciara
Constituent Liaison
Carr, Usha
Special Assistant
Casanova, Robert
Office Manager; Deputy Scheduler; Legislative Correspondent
Conley, Alicia
Correspondence Manager
Das, Raju
Research Aide; Outreach Aide
Downes, Maura
Deputy State Director for Constituent Services
Jee, Lauren
Legislative Assistant
Kalonia, Maya
Assistant to the Chief of Staff
Keefe, Grady
Constituent Liaison
Kelsey, Joel
Legislative Assistant
Lane, Khaliyl
Legislative Correspondent
Lebeau, Matthew
Research Aide; Outreach Aide
Madu, Chike
Research Aide; Outreach Organizer
Parikh, Shivani
Legislative Correspondent
Quiles, Ruth
Constituent Liaison
Rios, Yanira
Research Aide; Outreach Organizer
Sandman, Dana
Director of Scheduling
Saxon, Ethan
Legislative Director
Simon, Sam
Senior Counsel
Toppin, E.J.
Legislative Aide
Yu, Anna
Legislative Assistant
Zembik, Joshua
Communications Director
Das, Raju
Research Aide; Outreach Aide
Lebeau, Matthew
Research Aide; Outreach Aide
Toppin, E.J.
Legislative Aide
Kalonia, Maya
Assistant to the Chief of Staff
Benton, Elizabeth
State Communications Director
Zembik, Joshua
Communications Director
Downes, Maura
Deputy State Director for Constituent Services
Sandman, Dana
Director of Scheduling
Jee, Lauren
Legislative Assistant
Kelsey, Joel
Legislative Assistant
Yu, Anna
Legislative Assistant
Bell, Don
Legislative Correspondent
Casanova, Robert
Office Manager; Deputy Scheduler; Legislative Correspondent
Lane, Khaliyl
Legislative Correspondent
Parikh, Shivani
Legislative Correspondent
Saxon, Ethan
Legislative Director
Bradnan, Ciara
Constituent Liaison
Keefe, Grady
Constituent Liaison
Quiles, Ruth
Constituent Liaison
Conley, Alicia
Correspondence Manager
Casanova, Robert
Office Manager; Deputy Scheduler; Legislative Correspondent
Botero, Gabriel
Research Aide; Outreach Organizer
Madu, Chike
Research Aide; Outreach Organizer
Rios, Yanira
Research Aide; Outreach Organizer
Botero, Gabriel
Research Aide; Outreach Organizer
Das, Raju
Research Aide; Outreach Aide
Lebeau, Matthew
Research Aide; Outreach Aide
Madu, Chike
Research Aide; Outreach Organizer
Rios, Yanira
Research Aide; Outreach Organizer
Allen, Tom
Scheduling Assistant
Casanova, Robert
Office Manager; Deputy Scheduler; Legislative Correspondent
Carr, Usha
Special Assistant
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Richard Blumenthal Committees
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Veterans' Affairs (Ranking member)
Richard Blumenthal Biography
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  • Elected: 2010, term expires 2016, 1st term.
  • State: Connecticut
  • Born: Feb. 13, 1946, Brooklyn, NY
  • Home: Greenwich
  • Education:

    Harvard U., B.A. 1967; Yale U., J.D. 1973.

  • Professional Career:

    Teacher, Washington, D.C., public schl., 1968-69; staff asst., White House Office of Econ. Opportunity, 1969-70; law clerk, 1973-75; administrative asst., Sen. Abraham Ribicoff, D-Conn., 1975-76; U.S. atty., CT, 1977-81; practing atty., 1981-1990.

  • Military Career:

    Marine Corps Reserve, 1970-76.

  • Political Career:

    CT House, 1984-88; CT Senate, 1988-91; CT atty. gen., 1991-2010.

  • Ethnicity: White/Caucasian
  • Religion:

    Jewish

  • Family: Married (Cynthia); 4 children

The senior senator from Connecticut is Democrat Richard Blumenthal, an Ivy League-educated former state attorney general who won an open seat contest against tea party-backed Republican Linda McMahon in 2010. He succeeded retiring Sen. Christopher Dodd, also a Democrat. Read More

The senior senator from Connecticut is Democrat Richard Blumenthal, an Ivy League-educated former state attorney general who won an open seat contest against tea party-backed Republican Linda McMahon in 2010. He succeeded retiring Sen. Christopher Dodd, also a Democrat.

Blumenthal was born in Brooklyn, N.Y., to Jane and Martin Blumenthal. His father fled Nazi Germany in 1935 and became wealthy by trading commodities in his adopted country. He sent his son to Harvard, where Blumenthal earned a bachelor’s degree in political science, and to Yale Law School, where he edited the Yale Law Journal. Blumenthal’s post-college list of employers reads like a Who’s Who of the Washington elite in the 1970s: He worked at The Washington Post for longtime publisher Katharine Graham; he was a staff assistant to Daniel Patrick Moynihan when Moynihan was a top adviser in the Nixon White House; and he clerked for Supreme Court Justice William Brennan. Blumenthal’s résumé impressed President Carter, who appointed him U.S. attorney in Connecticut in 1977.

Blumenthal went on to do some legal work for the NAACP Legal Defense Fund while in private practice in the early 1980s, where he gained wider fame by dismantling the case against an innocent prisoner on Connecticut’s death row. A stay was granted just 15 hours before Joseph Brown’s scheduled execution in 1983, and he was later released. (Brown’s wife was found dead in September 2012, and Brown was arrested again and charged with first degree murder. When contacted by the Associated Press for comment on the charge, Blumenthal declined.) Blumenthal went on to win election to the Connecticut Assembly in 1984 and to the state Senate in 1987 before his successful run for attorney general in 1990.

As the state’s top lawyer, Blumenthal actively pursued consumer protection lawsuits, including cases against tobacco companies, polluters, health insurers, and banks charging automatic teller fees. The lawsuits won Blumenthal increased popularity with Connecticut Democrats—and earned him the nickname “Sue ’Em All Blumenthal” from his detractors. He had long been considered a candidate for higher office, but other figures, notably independent Sen. Joe Lieberman, who remained on Connecticut’s Senate ballot in 2000 while also running for vice president, stood in his way. He was elected and reelected state attorney general five times since 1990, never with less than 59% of the vote.

He finally got his shot to run for the Senate in 2010 after Dodd announced he was retiring after five terms. But it was also the year when the tea party took flight, and what should have been a stroll in the park for Blumenthal, given his popularity in blue Connecticut, turned into a bruising fight against McMahon, the former head of World Wrestling Entertainment. The Republican nominee harnessed an upswing in GOP voter energy to make it a real contest, one that was monitored nationally as a possible gauge of the strength of the fledgling tea party movement.

The first sign things were not going to be easy for Blumenthal was his apparent exaggeration of his military service. A member of the Marine Corps Reserve from 1970 to 1975, Blumenthal claimed on several occasions to have served in Vietnam, though he never in fact was deployed. The McMahon campaign attacked him for distorting his record, putting a chink in his best asset: his long record of public service compared to McMahon’s recent embrace of politics as a second career. Blumenthal apologized, but the episode sparked a nasty back-and-forth campaign. Blumenthal’s camp went after McMahon for the sexism and use of steroids in professional wrestling, where McMahon earned her wealth as WWE president. He chided her for heavy personal spending on her campaign, saying voters deserved “an election, not an auction.”

Though Blumenthal enjoyed a wide lead over McMahon at the beginning of the race, it tightened considerably in the wake of the Marine Reserve flap. In a bad year for Democrats, Blumenthal stressed his independence from the national party on a handful of issues, including his opposition to the financial industry rescue. He also said that unlike McMahon, he would support letting the Bush-era tax cuts expire for households earning over $250,000 a year; she supported making them permanent for all income levels.

McMahon emphasized her business savvy as a CEO who created jobs, and talked about her middle-class upbringing by two civil service workers in North Carolina. To appeal to Democrats and independents, she billed herself as a centrist Republican who supported abortion rights and the prerogative of states to decide the same-sex marriage issue. Her readiness for the job was called into question with revelations that she had failed to even vote in elections in 2006 and 2008. But McMahon proved to be a tireless campaigner with an easy manner in the endless meet-and-greet aspects of the role.

Still, she could not overcome Connecticut’s Democratic tilt even in 2010’s poor climate for President Barack Obama and his party. The Hartford Courant noted that “she had persistent trouble winning over women voters, despite the fact she would have become the first female senator in the state’s history. Some women were turned off by some of the racier images of WWE; others didn’t like her aggressive advertising strategy.” Blumenthal won with 55% of the vote to 43% for McMahon. When the results were in, the Courant summed things up this way: “In the beginning, Richard Blumenthal looked unbeatable. At the end, he was. In between, there was quite a battle.”

In the Senate, Blumenthal has spent a lot of time on public health and consumer issues. In April 2011, he asked the Food and Drug Administration to ban the sale of menthol cigarettes, pointing out high usage rates among young people and minorities. In July of that year, he sponsored a bill aimed at increasing the federal government’s ability to combat Lyme disease, which was named after a town in Connecticut where a number of early cases of the disease were identified in the 1970s.

During the debate over banning insider trading in Congress, Blumenthal cosponsored an amendment with Sen. Mark Kirk, R-Ill. to eliminate pensions for members of Congress convicted of felonies while in office. Blumenthal noted that a National Taxpayers Union study found that former members of Congress convicted on charges of public corruption were drawing some $800,000 per year in taxpayer-funded pensions. The measure was adopted by the Senate in February 2012.

Blumenthal has seats on both the Senate Armed Services and Veterans’ Affairs committees. His son, Matthew, is a first lieutenant in the Marine Corps Reserve and has served in Afghanistan. In 2012, Roll Call newspaper declared Blumenthal the sixth-wealthiest member of Congress, with a large share of his money coming from his wife, Cynthia, the daughter of real estate tycoon Peter Malkin.

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Richard Blumenthal Election Results
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2010 General
Richard Blumenthal (D)
Votes: 636,040
Percent: 55.15%
Spent: $8,733,486
Linda McMahon
Votes: 498,341
Percent: 43.21%
Spent: $50,285,122
2010 Primary (Convention)
Richard Blumenthal Votes and Bills
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National Journal’s rating system is an objective method of analyzing voting. The liberal score means that the lawmaker’s votes were more liberal than that percentage of his colleagues’ votes. The conservative score means his votes were more conservative than that percentage of his colleagues’ votes. The composite score is an average of a lawmaker’s six issue-based scores. See all NJ Voting

More Liberal
More Conservative
2013 2012 2011
Economic 82 (L) : 8 (C) 95 (L) : - (C) 69 (L) : 25 (C)
Social 73 (L) : - (C) 64 (L) : - (C) 52 (L) : - (C)
Foreign 71 (L) : - (C) 85 (L) : - (C) 60 (L) : 39 (C)
Composite 86.3 (L) : 13.7 (C) 90.7 (L) : 9.3 (C) 69.5 (L) : 30.5 (C)
Interest Group Ratings

The vote ratings by 10 special interest groups provide insight into a lawmaker’s general ideology and the degree to which he or she agrees with the group’s point of view. Two organizations provide just one combined rating for 2011 and 2012, the two sessions of the 112th Congress. They are the ACLU and the ITIC. About the interest groups.

20112012
FRC140
LCV10086
CFG210
ITIC-63
NTU88
20112012
COC45-
ACLU-75
ACU50
ADA9590
AFSCME100-
Key Senate Votes

The key votes show how a member of Congress voted on the major bills of the year. N indicates a "no" vote; Y a "yes" vote. If a member voted "present" or was absent, the bill caption is not shown. For a complete description of the bills included in key votes, see the Almanac's Guide to Usage.

    • End fiscal cliff
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Block faith exemptions
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Approve gas pipeline
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • Approve farm bill
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Let cyber bill proceed
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Block Gitmo transfers
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • Raise debt limit
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Pass balanced budget amendment
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Stop EPA climate regulations
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Proceed to Cordray vote
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Require talking filibuster
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Limit Fannie/Freddie
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
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