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Democrat

Rep. John Carney (D)

John Carney Contact
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Email: n/a
DC Contact Information

Phone: 202-225-4165

Address: 1406 LHOB, DC 20515

State Office Contact Information

Phone: (302) 691-7333

Address: 233 North King Street, Wilmington DE 19801-2521

Georgetown DE

Phone: (302) 854-0667

Fax: (302) 854-0669

Address: 33 The Circle, Georgetown DE 19947-1593

John Carney Staff
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Sort by INTEREST NAME TITLE
German, Justin
Legislative Assistant
Slater, Drew
County Coordinator
German, Justin
Legislative Assistant
Shields, Albert
Press and Policy Advisor
Magarik, Molly
State Director
Radcliffe, Craig
Legislative Assistant
Grant, Sheila
Communications Director; Legislative Director
Grant, Sheila
Communications Director; Legislative Director
Magarik, Molly
State Director
Cade, Cerron
State Projects Director
Cade, Cerron
State Projects Director
Cade, Cerron
State Projects Director
Cade, Cerron
State Projects Director
Shields, Albert
Press and Policy Advisor
Cade, Cerron
State Projects Director
Cade, Cerron
State Projects Director
German, Justin
Legislative Assistant
Cade, Cerron
State Projects Director
German, Justin
Legislative Assistant
German, Justin
Legislative Assistant
Cade, Cerron
State Projects Director
Grant, Sheila
Communications Director; Legislative Director
Radcliffe, Craig
Legislative Assistant
German, Justin
Legislative Assistant
Slater, Drew
County Coordinator
Cade, Cerron
State Projects Director
German, Justin
Legislative Assistant
Morris, Larry
Constituent Services Liaison
Cade, Cerron
State Projects Director
German, Justin
Legislative Assistant
Morris, Larry
Constituent Services Liaison
Cade, Cerron
State Projects Director
Shields, Albert
Press and Policy Advisor
Grant, Sheila
Communications Director; Legislative Director
German, Justin
Legislative Assistant
Radcliffe, Craig
Legislative Assistant
Shields, Albert
Press and Policy Advisor
Grant, Sheila
Communications Director; Legislative Director
Shields, Albert
Press and Policy Advisor
German, Justin
Legislative Assistant
Morris, Larry
Constituent Services Liaison
German, Justin
Legislative Assistant
Cade, Cerron
State Projects Director
Shields, Albert
Press and Policy Advisor
Cade, Cerron
State Projects Director
German, Justin
Legislative Assistant
Magarik, Molly
State Director
Cade, Cerron
State Projects Director
German, Justin
Legislative Assistant
Magarik, Molly
State Director
Cade, Cerron
State Projects Director
Huxhold, Kristy
Scheduler; Executive Assistant
Slater, Drew
County Coordinator
Cade, Cerron
State Projects Director
Huxhold, Kristy
Scheduler; Executive Assistant
Slater, Drew
County Coordinator
Grant, Sheila
Communications Director; Legislative Director
Magarik, Molly
State Director
Cade, Cerron
State Projects Director
German, Justin
Legislative Assistant
Cade, Cerron
State Projects Director
German, Justin
Legislative Assistant
Magarik, Molly
State Director
Huxhold, Kristy
Scheduler; Executive Assistant
Radcliffe, Craig
Legislative Assistant
Cade, Cerron
State Projects Director
Shields, Albert
Press and Policy Advisor
German, Justin
Legislative Assistant
German, Justin
Legislative Assistant
Morris, Larry
Constituent Services Liaison
Huxhold, Kristy
Scheduler; Executive Assistant
Radcliffe, Craig
Legislative Assistant
German, Justin
Legislative Assistant
German, Justin
Legislative Assistant
German, Justin
Legislative Assistant
German, Justin
Legislative Assistant
Cade, Cerron
State Projects Director
German, Justin
Legislative Assistant
Cade, Cerron
State Projects Director
German, Justin
Legislative Assistant
Amodeo, Francesca
Legislative Correspondent
Cade, Cerron
State Projects Director
German, Justin
Legislative Assistant
Grant, Sheila
Communications Director; Legislative Director
Huxhold, Kristy
Scheduler; Executive Assistant
Magarik, Molly
State Director
Morris, Larry
Constituent Services Liaison
Radcliffe, Craig
Legislative Assistant
Shields, Albert
Press and Policy Advisor
Slater, Drew
County Coordinator
Shields, Albert
Press and Policy Advisor
Grant, Sheila
Communications Director; Legislative Director
Slater, Drew
County Coordinator
Cade, Cerron
State Projects Director
Magarik, Molly
State Director
Huxhold, Kristy
Scheduler; Executive Assistant
German, Justin
Legislative Assistant
Radcliffe, Craig
Legislative Assistant
Amodeo, Francesca
Legislative Correspondent
Grant, Sheila
Communications Director; Legislative Director
Morris, Larry
Constituent Services Liaison
Huxhold, Kristy
Scheduler; Executive Assistant
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John Carney Committees
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John Carney Biography
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  • Elected: 2010, 2nd term.
  • District: Delaware
  • Born: May. 20, 1956, Wilmington
  • Home: Wilmington
  • Education:

    Dartmouth Col., B.A. 1978; U. of DE, M.P.A. 1987.

  • Professional Career:

    Staff asst., Sen. Joe Biden, D-Del., 1986-89; dep. chief admin. officer, New Castle Cnty. Exec., 1989-94; dep. chief of staff, Gov. Thomas Carper, D-Del., 1994-97; pres., COO, Transformative Technologies, 2009-10.

  • Political Career:

    DE secy. of finance, 1997-2000; DE lt. gov., 2001-09.

  • Ethnicity: White/Caucasian
  • Religion:

    Catholic

  • Family: Married (Tracey); 2 children

John Carney, elected to succeed nine-term Republican Rep. Michael Castle in 2010, is a centrist Democrat with an unusual devotion to bipartisanship. Not long after taking office, he co-founded a policy group of Democrats and Republicans to calmly discuss finding common ground, and the group has gotten some results. Read More

John Carney, elected to succeed nine-term Republican Rep. Michael Castle in 2010, is a centrist Democrat with an unusual devotion to bipartisanship. Not long after taking office, he co-founded a policy group of Democrats and Republicans to calmly discuss finding common ground, and the group has gotten some results.

Carney, the second of nine children born to two teachers, has lived in Wilmington for most of his life. He was careful to stress his humble upbringing and the fact that he, his wife, and their two children live in a modest row house. Still, Carney has spent nearly his entire adult life in public office, except for brief stints as president and chief operating officer of Transformative Technologies, a Delaware green technology firm, and as executive vice president of a wind farm start-up called DelaWind. After getting a degree in English at Dartmouth College and a master’s degree at the University of Delaware, Carney went to work as an aide to Joe Biden, then a Democratic senator from Delaware. In the 1990s, Carney became a top aide to then Gov. Thomas Carper, now a U.S. senator. Carney was also the state secretary of finance under Carper from 1997 to 2000. That year, he won the first of two terms as Delaware’s lieutenant governor. In 2008, Carney tried to move up to the top job but lost a high-profile primary against Jack Markell for governor. Markell went on to win.

His track record in office earned him the scorn of tea party activists who labeled him a “career politician” in his campaign against Republican Glen Urquhart for Delaware’s at-large seat in the House. Carney faced Urquhart in the contest to succeed Castle, a Republican moderate, after Castle gave up the post to run what ultimately was a losing bid for the Senate. Carney ran on his support for the development of renewable energy technology and green jobs and his opposition to oil drilling off the Delaware shoreline.

Urquhart, a Rehoboth Beach developer, lambasted him for collecting government paychecks rather than creating jobs in the private sector. Urquhart also called attention to Carney’s attempt to lobby the state for money in 2009, when he worked for DelaWind. But left-leaning Delaware was skittish about some of Urquhart’s conservative positions. He said he would vote to repeal the health care law passed by Congress in 2010 and to abolish the departments of Energy and Education. The Republican’s social agenda and lack of polish also probably hurt him: In widely circulated comments, he compared liberals to Nazis while claiming that Hitler, not Thomas Jefferson, first coined the phrase “separation of church and state.”

Carney declared Urquhart too “radical” and “extreme” to represent the state. He also favored the Democrats’ financial regulation bill, a controversial stance in a state heavily reliant on finance and corporate headquarters. Carney had the upper hand in the money chase. He raised over $2 million, while Urquhart had $1.3 million, $1 million of it from his own pocket. On Election Day, Carney prevailed with 57% of the vote to 41% for his opponent, a rare instance of a Democrat seizing Republican territory in the GOP-friendly year of 2010.

In the House, Carney became the first freshman Democrat to have an amendment pass successfully when he added a provision to a bill in May 2011 making rail security a priority for U.S. intelligence agencies. He was assigned to the Financial Services Committee and struck up a friendship with fellow freshman James Renacci, a Republican from Ohio, whom he admired for having a common sense approach to problems. They started a breakfast group that eventually grew to 14 lawmakers. “If our group can sit down, hear each other out, and come up with solutions we all agree on, that says something,” Carney told National Journal in September 2011. “Can we move the needle nationally? I don’t know, but it has to start somewhere.”

Carney joined another GOP freshman, Stephen Fincher of Tennessee, in drafting legislation to make it easier for small- and medium-sized companies to undertake an initial public offering and become a public company. Their measure passed the committee on a 54-1 vote in February 2012 and became law two months later after House Republicans included it in their job creation agenda. Meanwhile, Carney also helped lead a bipartisan effort to beseech President Barack Obama to consider a six-year transportation reauthorization bill and introduced his own proposal for a balanced budget amendment, a concept normally pushed by Republicans.

With Delaware favorite son Biden on the ballot on the 2012 presidential ticket, Carney was never in any political danger in his reelection bid that year. He raised seven times as much as Republican Tom Kovach, the New Castle County Council president, and won with 64% of the vote.

Show Less
John Carney Election Results
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2012 General
John Carney (D)
Votes: 249,933
Percent: 64.41%
Thomas Kovach (R)
Votes: 129,757
Percent: 33.44%
2012 Primary
John Carney (D)
Unopposed
Prior Winning Percentages
2010 (57%)
John Carney Votes and Bills
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National Journal’s rating system is an objective method of analyzing voting. The liberal score means that the lawmaker’s votes were more liberal than that percentage of his colleagues’ votes. The conservative score means his votes were more conservative than that percentage of his colleagues’ votes. The composite score is an average of a lawmaker’s six issue-based scores. See all NJ Voting

More Liberal
More Conservative
2013 2012 2011
Economic 62 (L) : 38 (C) 64 (L) : 35 (C) 64 (L) : 36 (C)
Social 66 (L) : 32 (C) 67 (L) : 33 (C) 68 (L) : 30 (C)
Foreign 74 (L) : 26 (C) 67 (L) : 32 (C) 62 (L) : 38 (C)
Composite 67.7 (L) : 32.3 (C) 66.3 (L) : 33.7 (C) 65.0 (L) : 35.0 (C)
Interest Group Ratings

The vote ratings by 10 special interest groups provide insight into a lawmaker’s general ideology and the degree to which he or she agrees with the group’s point of view. Two organizations provide just one combined rating for 2011 and 2012, the two sessions of the 112th Congress. They are the ACLU and the ITIC. About the interest groups.

20112012
FRC00
LCV9494
CFG824
ITIC-92
NTU1620
20112012
COC38-
ACLU-84
ACU08
ADA8065
AFSCME100-
Key House Votes

The key votes show how a member of Congress voted on the major bills of the year. N indicates a "no" vote; Y a "yes" vote. If a member voted "present" or was absent, the bill caption is not shown. For a complete description of the bills included in key votes, see the Almanac's Guide to Usage.

    • Pass GOP budget
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • End fiscal cliff
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Extend payroll tax cut
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Stop student loan hike
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • Repeal health care
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • Raise debt limit
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Pass cut, cap, balance
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Defund Planned Parenthood
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Repeal lightbulb ban
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Add endangered listings
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Speed troop withdrawal
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
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The Almanac is a members-only database of searchable profiles compiled and adapted from the Almanac of American Politics. Comprehensive online profiles include biographical and political summaries of elected officials, campaign expenditures, voting records, interest-group ratings, and congressional staff look-ups. In-depth overviews of each state and house district are included as well, along with demographic data, analysis of voting trends, and political histories.
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