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Republican

Rep. Cory Gardner - OLD (R)

Cory Gardner - OLD Contact
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Email: n/a
DC Contact Information

Phone: 202-225-4676

Address: 213 CHOB, DC 20515

State Office Contact Information

Phone: (970) 351-6007

Address: 915 10th Street, Greeley CO 80631-1117

Rocky Ford CO

Phone: (719) 316-1101

Fax: (719) 316-1103

Address: 408 North Main Street, Rocky Ford CO 81067-1256

Yuma CO

Phone: (970) 848-2845

Address: 529 North Albany, Yuma CO 80753-1531

Castle Rock CO

Phone: (720) 508-3937

Fax: (720) 583-0873

Address: 7505 Village Square Drive, Castle Rock CO 80108-3692

Cory Gardner - OLD Staff
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Loraine, Jennifer
Senior Energy Advisor
Loraine, Jennifer
Senior Energy Advisor
Barrera, Amy
Director of Scheduling
Dobson, Logan
Communications Advisor
Jimenez, Alejandra
Legislative Correspondent
Loraine, Jennifer
Senior Energy Advisor
Love, Sam
Legislative Aide
Scheirman, Kristen
Legislative Correspondent
Siciliano, Alex
Communications Director
Swager, Curtis
Legislative Director
Warren, Carolyn
Legislative Correspondent
Williamson, Joe
Legislative Assistant
Dobson, Logan
Communications Advisor
Loraine, Jennifer
Senior Energy Advisor
Love, Sam
Legislative Aide
Siciliano, Alex
Communications Director
Barrera, Amy
Director of Scheduling
Williamson, Joe
Legislative Assistant
Jimenez, Alejandra
Legislative Correspondent
Scheirman, Kristen
Legislative Correspondent
Warren, Carolyn
Legislative Correspondent
Swager, Curtis
Legislative Director
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Cory Gardner - OLD Committees
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Cory Gardner - OLD Biography
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  • Elected: 2010, term expires 2014, 2nd term.
  • District: Colorado 4
  • Born: Aug. 22, 1974, Yuma
  • Home: Yuma
  • Education:

    CO St. U., B.S. 1997; U. of CO, J.D. 2001.

  • Professional Career:

    Communications dir., Natl. Corn Growers Assn., 2001-02; staffer, Sen. Wayne Allard, R-Colo., 2002-05; owner, Farmers Implement dealership.

  • Political Career:

    CO House, 2005-10.

  • Ethnicity: White/Caucasian
  • Religion:

    Lutheran

  • Family: Married (Jaime); 1 children

Republican Cory Gardner, who toppled freshman Democrat Betsy Markey in 2010, has become one of the House’s most active players on energy issues. Representing an area that includes an ethanol plant, wind farms and solar manufacturers as well as rich shale oil and natural gas deposits, he has sought to get the GOP to move beyond its fossil-fuels-first orientation. Read More

Republican Cory Gardner, who toppled freshman Democrat Betsy Markey in 2010, has become one of the House’s most active players on energy issues. Representing an area that includes an ethanol plant, wind farms and solar manufacturers as well as rich shale oil and natural gas deposits, he has sought to get the GOP to move beyond its fossil-fuels-first orientation.

Gardner in March 2014 decided to apply his political energies to challenging Democratic Sen. Mark Udall in November. His announcement cleared the GOP primary field and turned what widely was assumed to be an easy re-election bid for Udall into an extremely competitive battle that quickly became one of the most-watched Senate races.

Gardner grew up in Yuma, Colo., a tiny farming and ranching town 150 miles east of Denver. His family owns and operates a farm implement dealership founded by his great-grandfather, who settled north of Yuma in 1886. After high school, Gardner enrolled in the University of Colorado at Boulder, but the raucous campus was “a little bit of a big change” from sleepy Yuma, and he eventually transferred to Colorado State University in Fort Collins, where he joined a chapter of the FarmHouse Fraternity. After graduating summa cum laude in 1997, Gardner returned to Yuma in pursuit of a pastoral lifestyle. But his father urged him to consider a profession less closely tied to the vagaries of Colorado’s Eastern Plains. Several seasons of drought were beginning to take a toll, and his father suggested he indulge his longtime interest in the law.

In 2001, Gardner got a law degree from the University of Colorado and took a job as communications director for the National Corn Growers Association. The following year, he became an aide to then-U.S. Sen. Wayne Allard, a Republican. In the summer of 2005, Gardner was appointed to fill a vacancy in the Colorado House, and a year later he was elected to a full term. As a lawmaker, Gardner helped establish the Colorado Clean Energy Authority, which facilitated the investment of millions of dollars in renewable energy projects. He also championed telemedicine, advancing legislation that allowed Medicaid reimbursements for patients who were examined remotely using a machine that measures and relays blood pressure and other vital signs to a doctor.

Believing Markey to be vulnerable in early 2010, state Republicans coalesced around Gardner. They viewed him as a rising star in the state party and emphasized his deep roots in the district’s heavily Republican Eastern Plains. By mid-October, Markey had significantly outraised her challenger, $3.2 million to $2 million. Two years earlier, she had clobbered then Rep. Marilyn Musgrave, beating the Republican by 12 percentage points in an election that was viewed as a repudiation of the ultraconservative Musgrave.

But conservative voters in 2010 were energized in opposition to the Obama administration; Gardner pounded Markey for supporting the president’s spending policies while skirting the social issues that could potentially alienate suburban voters. Markey struggled to reconcile her credentials as a conservative Blue Dog Democrat with her votes in favor of Obama’s $787 billion economic stimulus bill, his health insurance overhaul and a proposal to limit carbon emissions. Gardner won, 52% to 41%.

In the House, Gardner has been one of his freshman class’ more faithful followers of the GOP leadership. He was assigned to co-lead a National Republican Congressional Committee effort to collect dues from members. He signed on as an early cosponsor of a balanced budget resolution and called for cutting the corporate tax rate, a move he said would free up money for companies to hire workers. He added an amendment to a House-passed spending bill in February 2011 to try to deny startup funds for the health care exchanges created in the new Obama plan. He became friends with House Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan, R-Wis., often joining Ryan on the vice presidential campaign trail in 2012.

Gardner received a choice seat on the Committee on Energy and Commerce and often was part of House Republican messaging on energy matters. He took an interest in reducing the regulatory burdens on water-storage projects that are important to farmers and developers. The House also passed his bill in June 2011 to streamline the process of energy permitting in the Alaskan Outer Continental Shelf. He originally backed another bill to provide tax credits for natural gas development, but withdrew as a cosponsor after the plan drew fire from some influential figures on the right. One of them was the conservative Koch Industries, whose political action committee had given Gardner $12,500 in the previous two years. He denied the donations played any role in his decision. Environmentalists decried his record, with one of them, Clean Water Action, declaring that his votes “to gut protections for the environment and public health may make him the most anti-environmental congressman in Colorado history.”

But his moves weren’t all partisan; he formed an Energy Savings Performance Caucus with Vermont Democrat Peter Welch in December 2012. “I believe that the Republican Party, the party of conservationists, ought to embrace any marketable form of energy,” he said in September 2012.

Gardner’s district became more Republican in redistricting after the 2010 census. His 2012 election opponent was Colorado Senate President Brandon Shaffer, a former Navy officer and a rising Democratic star in state politics. National Democrats hoped that Shaffer would move into the more competitive, redrawn 6th District to challenge GOP Rep. Mike Coffman, but he refused to leave his Longmont home. Gardner won with 58% of the vote.

In announcing his decision to challenge Udall, Gardner made clear he would campaign as a political outsider who could get things done in Washington. "The United States that we know is fading," he said. "Amidst big government boondoggles and unaccountable bureaucracies, the people of this country find themselves working harder and harder each and every day only to see the promise of opportunity slip further and further from their reach."

He also charged that Udall "failed to stand up to Harry Reid," the Senate majority leader. Udall quickly answered by seeking to paint Gardner as extreme on social issues, launching ads attacking Gardner on birth control and abortion. Gardner responded that he changed his stance on a "personhood" bill that could have resulted in banning certain forms of birth control after soliciting input from voters, a move he said “Udall and President Obama can’t relate to.” 

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Cory Gardner - OLD Election Results
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2012 General
Cory Gardner (R)
Votes: 200,006
Percent: 58.42%
Brandon Shaffer (D)
Votes: 125,800
Percent: 36.75%
Joel Gilliland (Lib)
Votes: 10,682
Percent: 3.12%
2012 Primary
Cory Gardner (R)
Votes: 49,340
Percent: 100.0%
Prior Winning Percentages
2010 (52%)
Cory Gardner - OLD Votes and Bills
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National Journal’s rating system is an objective method of analyzing voting. The liberal score means that the lawmaker’s votes were more liberal than that percentage of his colleagues’ votes. The conservative score means his votes were more conservative than that percentage of his colleagues’ votes. The composite score is an average of a lawmaker’s six issue-based scores. See all NJ Voting

More Liberal
More Conservative
2013 2012 2011
Economic 25 (L) : 75 (C) 7 (L) : 91 (C) 23 (L) : 73 (C)
Social 34 (L) : 62 (C) - (L) : 91 (C) - (L) : 83 (C)
Foreign 5 (L) : 86 (C) - (L) : 91 (C) 9 (L) : 86 (C)
Composite 23.5 (L) : 76.5 (C) 5.7 (L) : 94.3 (C) 15.0 (L) : 85.0 (C)
Interest Group Ratings

The vote ratings by 10 special interest groups provide insight into a lawmaker’s general ideology and the degree to which he or she agrees with the group’s point of view. Two organizations provide just one combined rating for 2011 and 2012, the two sessions of the 112th Congress. They are the ACLU and the ITIC. About the interest groups.

20112012
FRC90100
LCV1111
CFG7086
ITIC-75
NTU7682
20112012
COC100-
ACLU-0
ACU8492
ADA05
AFSCME0-
Key House Votes

The key votes show how a member of Congress voted on the major bills of the year. N indicates a "no" vote; Y a "yes" vote. If a member voted "present" or was absent, the bill caption is not shown. For a complete description of the bills included in key votes, see the Almanac's Guide to Usage.

    • Pass GOP budget
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • End fiscal cliff
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • Extend payroll tax cut
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • Find AG in contempt
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Stop student loan hike
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Repeal health care
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Raise debt limit
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Pass cut, cap, balance
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Defund Planned Parenthood
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Repeal lightbulb ban
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Add endangered listings
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Speed troop withdrawal
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
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The Almanac is a members-only database of searchable profiles compiled and adapted from the Almanac of American Politics. Comprehensive online profiles include biographical and political summaries of elected officials, campaign expenditures, voting records, interest-group ratings, and congressional staff look-ups. In-depth overviews of each state and house district are included as well, along with demographic data, analysis of voting trends, and political histories.
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