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Republican

Rep. Scott Garrett (R)

Scott Garrett Contact
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Email: n/a
DC Contact Information

Phone: 202-225-4465

Address: 2232 RHOB, DC 20515

State Office Contact Information

Phone: (201) 444-5454

Address: 266 Harristown Road, Glen Rock NJ 07452-3321

Newton NJ

Phone: (973) 300-2000

Fax: (973) 300-1051

Address: 83 Spring Street, Newton NJ 07860-2080

Scott Garrett Staff
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Russell, Christopher
Senior Policy Advisor
Shaw, Andrew
Legislative Director
Russell, Christopher
Senior Policy Advisor
Shaw, Andrew
Legislative Director
Russell, Christopher
Senior Policy Advisor
Russell, Christopher
Senior Policy Advisor
Shaw, Andrew
Legislative Director
Russell, Christopher
Senior Policy Advisor
Russell, Christopher
Senior Policy Advisor
Russell, Christopher
Senior Policy Advisor
Russell, Christopher
Senior Policy Advisor
Russell, Christopher
Senior Policy Advisor
Shaw, Andrew
Legislative Director
Shaw, Andrew
Legislative Director
Russell, Christopher
Senior Policy Advisor
Russell, Christopher
Senior Policy Advisor
Shaw, Andrew
Legislative Director
Russell, Christopher
Senior Policy Advisor
Russell, Christopher
Senior Policy Advisor
Russell, Christopher
Senior Policy Advisor
Shaw, Andrew
Legislative Director
Russell, Christopher
Senior Policy Advisor
Shaw, Andrew
Legislative Director
Russell, Christopher
Senior Policy Advisor
Russell, Christopher
Senior Policy Advisor
Russell, Christopher
Senior Policy Advisor
Shaw, Andrew
Legislative Director
Russell, Christopher
Senior Policy Advisor
Russell, Christopher
Senior Policy Advisor
Russell, Christopher
Senior Policy Advisor
Russell, Christopher
Senior Policy Advisor
Shaw, Andrew
Legislative Director
Shaw, Andrew
Legislative Director
Russell, Christopher
Senior Policy Advisor
Shaw, Andrew
Legislative Director
Russell, Christopher
Senior Policy Advisor
Shaw, Andrew
Legislative Director
Russell, Christopher
Senior Policy Advisor
Russell, Christopher
Senior Policy Advisor
Russell, Christopher
Senior Policy Advisor
Shaw, Andrew
Legislative Director
Russell, Christopher
Senior Policy Advisor
Shaw, Andrew
Legislative Director
Russell, Christopher
Senior Policy Advisor
Russell, Christopher
Senior Policy Advisor
Shaw, Andrew
Legislative Director
Russell, Christopher
Senior Policy Advisor
Russell, Christopher
Senior Policy Advisor
Russell, Christopher
Senior Policy Advisor
Coates, Dana
Constituent Services Officer
Garfinkle, Christina
Constituent Services Officer
Grant, Bobby
Staff Assistant; Press Assistant
Nittolo, Amy
District Coordinator
Pettet, Robert
District Director
Russell, Christopher
Senior Policy Advisor
Seidel, Maggie
Communications Director
Shaw, Andrew
Legislative Director
Sinacore, Michael
Legislative Correspondent
Smith, Amy
Chief of Staff
Whitehouse, Andrew
Constituent Services Officer
Russell, Christopher
Senior Policy Advisor
Smith, Amy
Chief of Staff
Seidel, Maggie
Communications Director
Coates, Dana
Constituent Services Officer
Garfinkle, Christina
Constituent Services Officer
Whitehouse, Andrew
Constituent Services Officer
Nittolo, Amy
District Coordinator
Pettet, Robert
District Director
Sinacore, Michael
Legislative Correspondent
Shaw, Andrew
Legislative Director
Grant, Bobby
Staff Assistant; Press Assistant
Grant, Bobby
Staff Assistant; Press Assistant
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Scott Garrett Committees
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Scott Garrett Biography
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  • Elected: 2002, 6th term.
  • District: New Jersey 5
  • Born: Jul. 09, 1959, Englewood
  • Home: Wantage
  • Education:

    Montclair St. U., B.A. 1981, Rutgers U., J.D. 1984

  • Professional Career:

    Practicing atty., 1984-2002.

  • Political Career:

    NJ Assembly, 1990-2002.

  • Ethnicity: White/Caucasian
  • Religion:

    Protestant

  • Family: Married (Mary Ellen); 2 children

Republican Scott Garrett, elected in 2002, is the most conservative member of New Jersey’s congressional delegation. His uncompromising views on reining in federal spending and the regulation of the banking system set him apart from his Garden State colleagues, but make him a player on the Budget and Financial Services committees. Read More

Republican Scott Garrett, elected in 2002, is the most conservative member of New Jersey’s congressional delegation. His uncompromising views on reining in federal spending and the regulation of the banking system set him apart from his Garden State colleagues, but make him a player on the Budget and Financial Services committees.

Garrett grew up on a farm in Wantage, where his parents grew tomatoes and Christmas trees. The family’s main income came from his father’s job as a salesman for Uniroyal. A conservative from the start, Garrett questioned his high school administration’s spending practices and kept a picture of David Stockman, the father of Reaganomics, at his desk. He graduated from Montclair State College and Rutgers law school, and became a trial lawyer in Sussex County. He is a born-again Christian who meets most Saturday mornings for three hours with a small group that calls itself Joshua Men.

In 1989, Garrett was elected to the New Jersey General Assembly, where he quickly became one of the most conservative members. In 1998 and 2000, he challenged veteran U.S. Rep. Marge Roukema, a moderate Republican, in the primary. He attacked Roukema for supporting abortion rights and gun control laws. She emphasized her conservative votes on economic issues and was backed by the conservative House Republican leadership. Each time, Garrett carried the western part of the district, but Roukema ran strongly in her Bergen County base, winning by 53%-47% in 1998 and 52%-48% in 2000.

When Roukema announced that she would not seek another term in 2002, Garrett ran again. His challenge in the primary was to sell his views in Bergen County, where Sussex County is viewed as a distant province somewhere near Idaho. Two well-known Republicans from Bergen entered the race: state Sen. Gerald Cardinale and Assemblyman David Russo. They argued that nominating Garrett would put the seat at risk. But Garrett won the primary with 41% to 26% for Russo and 25% for Cardinale. Garrett won 81% of the vote in Sussex and 68% in Warren. But he won just 25% in Bergen County, raising Democratic hopes.

The Democratic nominee was Anne Sumers, a former Republican who switched parties in early 2002 and stressed her agreement with Roukema on most issues. With help from the national Democrats, Sumers attacked Garrett as an “extremist,” pointing to his support for limited federal aid to education.Garrett pounced on Sumers’ failure to vote in local school board elections and her musings on a liberal website, where she characterized American patriotism as “jingoistic.” Meanwhile, he soft-pedaled some of his more conservative views. Sumers outspent Garrett, $1.6 million to $1.3 million, including nearly $400,000 of her own money. But national Republicans spent heavily on issue ads on Garrett’s behalf. This turned out to be less of a contest than many people expected. Garrett won 59%-38%. In Bergen County, which cast 64% of the total vote, he led 55%-43%.

In the House, Garrett’s views are more conservative than the average New Jersey Republican’s. “I believe Scott, with all due respect, is to the right of Attila the Hun,” Democratic Rep. Bill Pascrell told The Record of Hackensack in September 2012. Garrett was the only New Jersey delegation member to oppose extending unemployment benefits, the only one to vote against making gasoline price-gouging a crime, and the only one to vote for lifting a ban on gas and oil drilling off the coast of New Jersey. After Hurricane Sandy ravaged parts of New Jersey in October 2012, he was the only delegation member who initially refused to sign a letter asking for prompt action. He did, however, eventually sign a letter and support the legislation that passed the House.

He seems to have rebounded from his vote against the Republicans’ Medicare prescription drug bill in 2003, a move that angered GOP leaders and limited his influence in the House. He has long pushed for a resolution that would require all legislation to cite an enumerated power in the Constitution, and he wants to require congressional staff to receive annual training on the document. He told a tea party audience in October 2012: “Government regulations dictate what kind of health insurance we have, what kind of light bulb we buy, what kind of soda we drink, what kind of car we drive. This is a dark time for our republic.” Because of term limits, Garrett was due to rotate off the Budget Committee in 2011, but House Speaker John Boehner appointed him to serve another term.

Even though many of his constituents work on Wall Street, Garrett opposed the bailout of the financial markets in 2008, saying he was “wary of using taxpayer dollars to prop up failing businesses.” In 2009, he leapfrogged other members and became the ranking Republican on the Financial Services Committee’s Subcommittee on Capital Markets, Insurance, and Government-Sponsored Enterprises. He became chairman after the Republican takeover of the House in 2011, and made clear his intention to slow down and deny funding to agencies with responsibilities for implementing the sweeping Dodd-Frank financial services overhaul law passed a year earlier. But the Democratic-controlled Senate was disinclined to curb Dodd-Frank, and House Republican leaders were reluctant to swallow Garrett’s idea to replace Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, the housing mortgage giants, with a purely private mortgage market.

Garrett clashed repeatedly with full committee ranking Democrat Barney Frank of Massachusetts before Frank’s retirement in 2012. Frank complained that Garrett and his frequent ally, Jeb Hensarling of Texas, set the tone for Republicans’ unwillingness to negotiate on the financial services overhaul. As a result of their intransigence, the two “had no influence on the major parts of the bill,” Frank told The Record newspaper in July 2010. Garrett was expected to have an equally difficult time with California’s Maxine Waters, a liberal firebrand who succeeded Frank as the ranking Democrat.

Garrett has overcome some serious reelection challenges. In 2006, Paul Aronsohn, a former aide to Democratic Gov. Jim McGreevey, called Garrett “too extreme, too disconnected to the people he represents,” raised nearly $600,000, and cut Garrett’s margin in Bergen to 51%-48%. But with more than 60% of the vote in Sussex and Warren counties, Garrett won 55%-44%. He sailed to victory in 2010.

Democrats hoped to unseat him in 2012, but had trouble attracting a high-profile challenger, and the job fell to Teaneck Deputy Mayor Adam Gussen. The Record endorsed Gussen and rebuked Garrett for failing to acknowledge “that America is a much more complicated place in 2012 than it was in 1787.” But Gussen raised a pitiable $51,000 while Garrett collected almost $2.4 million, and the incumbent won 55%-43%.

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Scott Garrett Election Results
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2012 General
Scott Garrett (R)
Votes: 167,501
Percent: 55.03%
Adam Gussen (D)
Votes: 130,100
Percent: 42.74%
Patricia Alessandrini
Votes: 6,770
Percent: 2.22%
2012 Primary
Scott Garrett (R)
Votes: 24,709
Percent: 87.23%
Michael Cino (R)
Votes: 2,107
Percent: 7.44%
Bonnie Somer (R)
Votes: 1,511
Percent: 5.33%
Prior Winning Percentages
2010 (65%), 2008 (56%), 2006 (55%), 2004 (58%), 2002 (59%)
Scott Garrett Votes and Bills
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National Journal’s rating system is an objective method of analyzing voting. The liberal score means that the lawmaker’s votes were more liberal than that percentage of his colleagues’ votes. The conservative score means his votes were more conservative than that percentage of his colleagues’ votes. The composite score is an average of a lawmaker’s six issue-based scores. See all NJ Voting

More Liberal
More Conservative
2013 2012 2011
Economic 13 (L) : 85 (C) 26 (L) : 73 (C) 45 (L) : 54 (C)
Social 16 (L) : 74 (C) 21 (L) : 75 (C) - (L) : 83 (C)
Foreign 34 (L) : 60 (C) 20 (L) : 73 (C) 38 (L) : 60 (C)
Composite 24.0 (L) : 76.0 (C) 24.3 (L) : 75.7 (C) 31.0 (L) : 69.0 (C)
Interest Group Ratings

The vote ratings by 10 special interest groups provide insight into a lawmaker’s general ideology and the degree to which he or she agrees with the group’s point of view. Two organizations provide just one combined rating for 2011 and 2012, the two sessions of the 112th Congress. They are the ACLU and the ITIC. About the interest groups.

20112012
FRC10083
LCV911
CFG9993
ITIC-67
NTU8784
20112012
COC88-
ACLU-7
ACU96100
ADA015
AFSCME0-
Key House Votes

The key votes show how a member of Congress voted on the major bills of the year. N indicates a "no" vote; Y a "yes" vote. If a member voted "present" or was absent, the bill caption is not shown. For a complete description of the bills included in key votes, see the Almanac's Guide to Usage.

    • Pass GOP budget
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • End fiscal cliff
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • Extend payroll tax cut
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • Find AG in contempt
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Stop student loan hike
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • Repeal health care
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Raise debt limit
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Pass cut, cap, balance
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Defund Planned Parenthood
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Repeal lightbulb ban
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Add endangered listings
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Speed troop withdrawal
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Regulate financial firms
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2010
    • Pass tax cuts for some
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2010
    • Stop detainee transfers
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2010
    • Legalize immigrants' kids
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2010
    • Repeal don't ask, tell
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2010
    • Limit campaign funds
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2010
    • Overturn Ledbetter
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Pass $820 billion stimulus
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Let guns in national parks
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Pass cap-and-trade
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Bar federal abortion funds
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Pass health care bill
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Bail out financial markets
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2008
    • Repeal D.C. gun law
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2008
    • Overhaul FISA
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2008
    • Increase minimum wage
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • Expand SCHIP
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • Raise CAFE standards
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • Share immigration data
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
    • Foreign aid abortion ban
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
    • Ban gay bias in workplace
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • Withdraw troops 8/08
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • No operations in Iran
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • Free trade with Peru
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
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The Almanac is a members-only database of searchable profiles compiled and adapted from the Almanac of American Politics. Comprehensive online profiles include biographical and political summaries of elected officials, campaign expenditures, voting records, interest-group ratings, and congressional staff look-ups. In-depth overviews of each state and house district are included as well, along with demographic data, analysis of voting trends, and political histories.
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