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Republican

Rep. Renee Ellmers (R)

Renee Ellmers Contact
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Email: n/a
DC Contact Information

Phone: 202-225-4531

Address: 426 CHOB, DC 20515

State Office Contact Information

Phone: (910) 230-1910

Address: 406 West Broad Street, Dunn NC 28334-4808

Asheboro NC

Phone: (336) 626-3060

Fax: (336) 629-7819

Address: 222 Sunset Avenue, Asheboro NC 27203-5668

Renee Ellmers Staff
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Wood, Adam
Legislative Assistant
Thompson, Kristi
Legislative Assistant
Thompson, Kristi
Legislative Assistant
McKinney, Mac
Legislative Assistant
McKinney, Mac
Legislative Assistant
McKinney, Mac
Legislative Assistant
Thompson, Kristi
Legislative Assistant
Thompson, Kristi
Legislative Assistant
Wood, Adam
Legislative Assistant
Wood, Adam
Legislative Assistant
Thompson, Kristi
Legislative Assistant
Thompson, Kristi
Legislative Assistant
Thompson, Kristi
Legislative Assistant
Lytton, Al
Chief of Staff
McKinney, Mac
Legislative Assistant
Wood, Adam
Legislative Assistant
Thompson, Kristi
Legislative Assistant
Vakerics, Mitchell
Legislative Director
McKinney, Mac
Legislative Assistant
Thompson, Kristi
Legislative Assistant
Wood, Adam
Legislative Assistant
McKinney, Mac
Legislative Assistant
Thompson, Kristi
Legislative Assistant
Thompson, Kristi
Legislative Assistant
Thompson, Kristi
Legislative Assistant
Thompson, Kristi
Legislative Assistant
Vakerics, Mitchell
Legislative Director
McKinney, Mac
Legislative Assistant
Thompson, Kristi
Legislative Assistant
Vakerics, Mitchell
Legislative Director
Vakerics, Mitchell
Legislative Director
Vakerics, Mitchell
Legislative Director
Vakerics, Mitchell
Legislative Director
Wood, Adam
Legislative Assistant
McKinney, Mac
Legislative Assistant
McKinney, Mac
Legislative Assistant
McKinney, Mac
Legislative Assistant
McKinney, Mac
Legislative Assistant
Thompson, Kristi
Legislative Assistant
Briles, Rebecca
Constituent Services Director
Byrd, Lorie
E-Media Director
Ellis, Blair
Press Secretary
Fitzgerald, Pat
District Director
Fox, Bryan
Caseworker
Lytton, Al
Chief of Staff
McDowell, Drew
Legislative Correspondent
McKinney, Mac
Legislative Assistant
Thompson, Kristi
Legislative Assistant
Vakerics, Mitchell
Legislative Director
Wood, Adam
Legislative Assistant
Fox, Bryan
Caseworker
Lytton, Al
Chief of Staff
Briles, Rebecca
Constituent Services Director
Byrd, Lorie
E-Media Director
Fitzgerald, Pat
District Director
McKinney, Mac
Legislative Assistant
Thompson, Kristi
Legislative Assistant
Wood, Adam
Legislative Assistant
McDowell, Drew
Legislative Correspondent
Vakerics, Mitchell
Legislative Director
Ellis, Blair
Press Secretary
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Renee Ellmers Committees
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Renee Ellmers Biography
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  • Elected: 2010, 2nd term.
  • District: North Carolina 2
  • Born: Feb. 09, 1964, Ironwood, MI
  • Home: Dunn
  • Education:

    Oakland U., B.S. 1990.

  • Professional Career:

    Surgical intensive care nurse, Beaumont Hospital; clinical dir., Trinity Wound Care Center, 2007-10.

  • Ethnicity: White/Caucasian
  • Religion:

    Christian

  • Family: Married (Brent); 1 children

The representative from the 2nd District is Renee Ellmers, who is among the rabid anti-Obama conservatives elected in 2010 but who has a more amiable relationship with her party leaders than others in her class. Read More

The representative from the 2nd District is Renee Ellmers, who is among the rabid anti-Obama conservatives elected in 2010 but who has a more amiable relationship with her party leaders than others in her class.

Ellmers grew up in the blue-collar Detroit suburb of Madison Heights, where her father worked in the auto industry. To pay her way through college, she trained as a medical assistant and worked full- and part-time jobs while taking classes. In 1990, she graduated from Oakland University in Rochester, Mich., with a bachelor’s degree in nursing. She worked as a nurse in the surgical intensive care unit at Beaumont Hospital, where she met her husband, surgeon Brent Ellmers. Shortly after the couple had their son, Ben, they took a trip to see family members in Cary, the fast-growing suburb just west of Raleigh, and decided to move to the Tar Heel State. They settled in Dunn, in Harnett County south of Raleigh, where Ellmers worked as a nurse in her husband’s practice at the Trinity Wound Care Center and got involved in the Dunn chamber of commerce.

As the 2010 election approached, state and national Republicans did little to mount a strong challenge to Rep. Bob Etheridge, a Democrat first elected in 1996 with a somewhat moderate record in a district that had voted Democratic for president in 2008. North Carolina Democrats thought enough of him to try to talk him into running against Sen. Richard Burr.

Meanwhile, Ellmers was appalled that her congressman had supported the Democrats’ health care legislation then wending its way to passage. “So rather than sit at home yelling at the TV set, which I did, I decided I needed to get involved,” she told The Sanford Herald. Ellmers started going to county GOP meetings and joined the bus tour organized by Americans for Prosperity as it traveled across the country protesting the legislation. Though unnoticed by national Republican strategists, she built enough of an organization to win the May GOP primary with 55% of the vote against two businessmen who got 26% and 19%. That was more than the 40% she needed to win without a runoff.

In the fall, Ellmers cast the general election as a stark choice between the Obama agenda and a different direction for the country. “I’m a mother, wife, and nurse, and I never dreamed I’d be running for Congress, but it’s time to put a stop to the Obama rubber stamp in Congress and Washington politics as usual,” she said, noting that Etheridge had voted with his party over 95% of the time.

In June, she got a big break from Etheridge himself. When two young Republican operatives approached the incumbent outside the House office buildings and asked him whether he supported “the Obama agenda,” Etheridge asked them repeatedly, in angry tones, who they were, and grabbed one by the wrist and the other, briefly, by the neck. The operatives captured the encounter on videotape and posted it on YouTube. Etheridge quickly apologized, but after the video got 3 million hits, contributions poured into Ellmers’ campaign. Republican groups followed up with $360,000 worth of attack ads highlighting the incident. And Ellmers got an endorsement from former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin, popular with the emerging tea party wing of the party.

National Republicans were still skeptical whether she was ready for prime time: In one of her ads, Ellmers claimed that an Islamic center planned for a site near Ground Zero in New York was a “victory mosque.” And Etheridge had a huge money advantage, spending $1.9 million to Ellmers’ $890,000. On Election Day, Ellmers edged out Etheridge 49.5%-48.7%. He asked for a recount, but it showed no significant change, and he conceded on November 19. In her first month in office, Ellmers attracted some attention when she declined an invitation to the White House.

In the House, Ellmers has taken an interest in small business and health care issues. She voted for the controversial overhaul of Medicare proposed by House Budget Chairman Paul Ryan, R-Wis. After the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee targeted Ellmers for that vote, she held district town hall meetings defending her position. Ellmers has insisted that overturning the 2010 health care law would help revive the economy. In the summer of 2011, she charged that the 15-member Independent Payment Advisory Board, established under the health care law, would have the ability to deny surgery to a patient, a charge that the News & Observer newspaper declared to be false.

Ellmers called for a congressional inquiry into federal funding for Planned Parenthood, a health care services organization that also provides abortions. Although she is a foe of same-sex marriage, she opposed a 2012 North Carolina ballot measure banning gay marriage in the state constitution; she said the initiative was too broadly written and should not include civil unions.

She has been an ally of House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, and is frequently seen at press conferences alongside the Republican leadership. She supported the leadership’s sweeping “cut, cap, and balance” bill that would, among other things, implement a constitutional amendment mandating a balanced budget. But unlike some conservative deficit hawks, Ellmers did eventually support the Boehner-White House budget compromise, voting for less radical spending changes in order to raise the debt limit in August 2011. That month, The New York Times described Ellmers this way: “Her loyalty, relentless cheer, and folksy locution … have combined to make her one of the Republican leadership’s greatest freshman allies, and a rising star in the conference.” In 2012, Ellmers was appointed to a special conference committee to hash out differences over a proposed payroll tax holiday.

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Renee Ellmers Election Results
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2012 General
Renee Ellmers (R)
Votes: 174,066
Percent: 55.9%
Stephen Wilkins (D)
Votes: 128,973
Percent: 41.42%
Brian Irving (Lib)
Votes: 8,358
Percent: 2.68%
2012 Primary
Renee Ellmers (R)
Votes: 37,661
Percent: 55.98%
Richard Speer (R)
Votes: 20,099
Percent: 29.87%
Sonya Holmes (R)
Votes: 6,535
Percent: 9.71%
Prior Winning Percentages
2010 (49%)
Renee Ellmers Votes and Bills
Back to top NJ Vote Ratings

National Journal’s rating system is an objective method of analyzing voting. The liberal score means that the lawmaker’s votes were more liberal than that percentage of his colleagues’ votes. The conservative score means his votes were more conservative than that percentage of his colleagues’ votes. The composite score is an average of a lawmaker’s six issue-based scores. See all NJ Voting

More Liberal
More Conservative
2013 2012 2011
Economic 29 (L) : 70 (C) 13 (L) : 86 (C) 10 (L) : 83 (C)
Social 16 (L) : 74 (C) 16 (L) : 83 (C) - (L) : 83 (C)
Foreign 15 (L) : 77 (C) 9 (L) : 86 (C) - (L) : 91 (C)
Composite 23.2 (L) : 76.8 (C) 13.8 (L) : 86.2 (C) 8.8 (L) : 91.2 (C)
Interest Group Ratings

The vote ratings by 10 special interest groups provide insight into a lawmaker’s general ideology and the degree to which he or she agrees with the group’s point of view. Two organizations provide just one combined rating for 2011 and 2012, the two sessions of the 112th Congress. They are the ACLU and the ITIC. About the interest groups.

20112012
FRC9083
LCV99
CFG5973
ITIC-75
NTU7374
20112012
COC94-
ACLU-0
ACU8491
ADA50
AFSCME0-
Key House Votes

The key votes show how a member of Congress voted on the major bills of the year. N indicates a "no" vote; Y a "yes" vote. If a member voted "present" or was absent, the bill caption is not shown. For a complete description of the bills included in key votes, see the Almanac's Guide to Usage.

    • Pass GOP budget
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • End fiscal cliff
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • Extend payroll tax cut
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Find AG in contempt
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Stop student loan hike
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Repeal health care
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Raise debt limit
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Pass cut, cap, balance
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Defund Planned Parenthood
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Repeal lightbulb ban
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Add endangered listings
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Speed troop withdrawal
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
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The Almanac is a members-only database of searchable profiles compiled and adapted from the Almanac of American Politics. Comprehensive online profiles include biographical and political summaries of elected officials, campaign expenditures, voting records, interest-group ratings, and congressional staff look-ups. In-depth overviews of each state and house district are included as well, along with demographic data, analysis of voting trends, and political histories.
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