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Republican

Rep. Paul Gosar (R)

Paul Gosar Contact
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Email: n/a
DC Contact Information

Phone: 202-225-2315

Address: 504 CHOB, DC 20515

Websites: gosar.house.gov
State Office Contact Information

Phone: (928) 445-1683

Address: 122 North Cortez Street, Prescott AZ 86301-3022

Kingman AZ

Address: 220 North 4th Street, Kingman AZ 86401-5817

San Tan Valley AZ

Phone: (480) 882-2697

Fax: (480) 882-2698

Address: 270 East Hunt Highway, San Tan Valley AZ 85143-2962

Paul Gosar Staff
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Small, Jeff
Legislative Director
Small, Jeff
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Pearson, Trevor
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Pearson, Trevor
Legislative Assistant
Small, Jeff
Legislative Director
Mansour, Michael
Legislative Assistant
Mansour, Michael
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Pearson, Trevor
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Small, Jeff
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Mansour, Michael
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Pearson, Trevor
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Mansour, Michael
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Small, Jeff
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Mansour, Michael
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Pearson, Trevor
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Mansour, Michael
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Mansour, Michael
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Pearson, Trevor
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Mansour, Michael
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Small, Jeff
Legislative Director
Small, Jeff
Legislative Director
Pearson, Trevor
Legislative Assistant
Pearson, Trevor
Legislative Assistant
Mansour, Michael
Legislative Assistant
Small, Jeff
Legislative Director
Pearson, Trevor
Legislative Assistant
Small, Jeff
Legislative Director
Mansour, Michael
Legislative Assistant
Small, Jeff
Legislative Director
Mansour, Michael
Legislative Assistant
Small, Jeff
Legislative Director
Mansour, Michael
Legislative Assistant
Small, Jeff
Legislative Director
Pearson, Trevor
Legislative Assistant
Small, Jeff
Legislative Director
Mansour, Michael
Legislative Assistant
Briggs, Stephen
Outreach Coordinator; Business Liaison
Brown, Julie
Prescott Office Manager
Foti, Leslie
Executive Assistant; Scheduler
Johnson, Sean
Wounded Warrior Liaison
Mansour, Michael
Legislative Assistant
Martinez, Teresa
Hispanic Outreach and Coalitions Director
Pearson, Trevor
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Pew, Penny
District Director
Renken, Larry
Veteran Outreach Coordinator
Small, Jeff
Legislative Director
Smith, Steven
Press Secretary
Van Flein, Thomas
Chief of Staff; Chief Legal Counsel
Van Flein, Thomas
Chief of Staff; Chief Legal Counsel
Briggs, Stephen
Outreach Coordinator; Business Liaison
Renken, Larry
Veteran Outreach Coordinator
Van Flein, Thomas
Chief of Staff; Chief Legal Counsel
Martinez, Teresa
Hispanic Outreach and Coalitions Director
Pew, Penny
District Director
Foti, Leslie
Executive Assistant; Scheduler
Mansour, Michael
Legislative Assistant
Pearson, Trevor
Legislative Assistant
Small, Jeff
Legislative Director
Briggs, Stephen
Outreach Coordinator; Business Liaison
Johnson, Sean
Wounded Warrior Liaison
Brown, Julie
Prescott Office Manager
Smith, Steven
Press Secretary
Foti, Leslie
Executive Assistant; Scheduler
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Paul Gosar Committees
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Paul Gosar Biography
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  • Elected: 2010, 2nd term.
  • District: Arizona 4
  • Born: Nov. 27, 1958, Rock Springs, WY
  • Home: Flagstaff
  • Education: Creighton U., B.S. 1981, D.D.S. 1985.
  • Professional Career: Owner, dental practice.
  • Ethnicity: White/Caucasian
  • Religion: Catholic
  • Family: Married (Maude); 3 children

Republican Paul Gosar unseated one-term 1st District Democratic Rep. Ann Kirkpatrick in 2010 with the backing of the national GOP glitterati, including former vice presidential nominee Sarah Palin. After switching to the more Republican-friendly 4th District, he overcame a fierce primary challenge on the right to prevail again in 2012. Read More

Republican Paul Gosar unseated one-term 1st District Democratic Rep. Ann Kirkpatrick in 2010 with the backing of the national GOP glitterati, including former vice presidential nominee Sarah Palin. After switching to the more Republican-friendly 4th District, he overcame a fierce primary challenge on the right to prevail again in 2012.

Gosar (GO sar) grew up in Pinedale, Wyo., a town of fewer than 2,000 residents near the headwaters of the Green River. He was the first of 10 children in the “Fighting Gosars,” a family he describes as close and also “rough and rowdy.” He and his brothers were altar boys in their Roman Catholic parish in nearby Rock Springs, but they weren’t beyond a little mischief, such as sneaking swigs of wine in the sacristy. Gosar’s father, a geologist with Belco Petroleum and Union Pacific, was often away working on rigs, and an uncle, who was a dentist, stepped in as a role model during those absences.

Gosar went on to study dentistry at Creighton University with the expectation that he would return to Wyoming to go into practice with his uncle. His father, however, advised him to seek a more vibrant economy. “My dad took me aside and said, ‘I don’t think the right time is here. I think the minerals, the oil, and gas are going to crash,” Gosar recalled. After receiving his D.D.S. in 1985, Gosar landed in Flagstaff, Ariz. Appealing to a local banker for financing to launch his practice in 1985, Gosar says he emphasized his frugality, vowing to eat nothing but peanut-butter-and-jelly sandwiches until his business was established. He married an antiques dealer, and the couple had three children.

When he decided to challenge Kirkpatrick in the 2010 election, Gosar said he was motivated by his contempt for the health care overhaul that the Democratic Congress passed in December 2009. Kirkpatrick had been in office for one term, having won the seat in 2008 after scandal-plagued Republican Rep. Rick Renzi resigned. In his campaign, Gosar sharply criticized her votes for President Barack Obama’s agenda in Congress, including the health care bill. He also took a hard line on immigration, in contrast to Kirkpatrick, touting his endorsement from Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio, who is well-known nationally for his aggressive pursuit of illegal immigrants in Arizona. Kirkpatrick refused to follow many other Democrats in tight reelection contests who distanced themselves from the administration. Her ads highlighted her support for Obama’s initiatives and cast Gosar as an irresponsible millionaire who was late paying business and property taxes 12 times.

Going into the fall contest, Kirkpatrick had $870,000 to spend, compared with Gosar’s $49,000. But he received help from the American Dental Association and other medical groups that opposed the health care law. He also was boosted by a prevailing trend of Republican expansion in suburban, high-growth areas in the district, and he got help from tea party activists. The national GOP wave, along with Palin’s endorsement, helped to seal his 50%-44% victory.

In Washington, Gosar immediately made clear his contempt for Washington’s typical ways. He told a reporter that the formal swearing-in ceremony on the House floor felt awkward, and that Congress should have held a barbecue with legislators serving people. He was given a seat on the Oversight and Government Reform Committee and became one of the first House members to call on Attorney General Eric Holder to resign in 2011 because of the failed “Operation Fast and Furious,” a program that facilitated the sale of thousands of weapons to Mexican drug cartels. In an interview with The Daily Caller, he accused Holder and other government officials of possibly being “accessories to murder” for their roles. On the Natural Resources Committee, he got a bill into law aimed at eliminating red tape on a dam project spanning the Coconino and Tonto national forests and won House passage of a bill that would swap 2,400 acres of Tonto forest land to make way for a new $4 billion copper mine. He also spoke out against the administration’s rules in 2012 for managing national forests and grasslands, saying they left constituents “vulnerable to catastrophic wildfires.” He unsuccessfully tried to amend legislation on the House floor to abolish Davis-Bacon Act requirements that federal contractors pay a prevailing union wage, calling them onerous for businesses.

Concerned over his reelection prospects, and faced with new, post-2010 redistricting lines that favored Democrats, Gosar in January 2012 announced he would move out of his Flagstaff home and run in the more Republican-leaning 4th District. (Kirkpatrick would go on to win back the 1st District seat.) Pinal County Sheriff Paul Babeu, a hard-liner on illegal immigration, initially was considered the front-runner, but his campaign’s momentum halted when a former boyfriend (and illegal immigrant) accused him of threatening deportation to keep their relationship quiet. Babeu came out as gay but denied the allegations, and he eventually ran again for sheriff.

That left Gosar with two challengers in the August 2012 GOP primary, state Sen. Ron Gould of Lake Havasu City and radio station owner Rick Murphy of Bullhead City. Gould, regarded as one of the Arizona legislature’s most conservative members, waged an aggressive campaign against Gosar, attacking him for being the only GOP member of Arizona’s House delegation to support the 2011 deal to raise the nation’s debt limit. The anti-tax group Club for Growth contributed heavily to Gould’s campaign, but the American Dental Association’s political action committee countered with help for a fellow dentist. Gosar won with 51% to Gould’s 32% and Murphy’s 17%. Gosar had far less trouble in November dispatching largely unknown Democratic businessman Johnnie Robinson and two minor-party candidates.

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Paul Gosar Election Results
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2012 General
Paul Gosar (R)
Votes: 162,907
Percent: 66.83%
Johnnie Robinson (D)
Votes: 69,154
Percent: 28.37%
Joe Pamelia (Lib)
Votes: 9,306
Percent: 3.82%
2012 Primary
Paul Gosar (R)
Votes: 40,033
Percent: 51.35%
Ron Gould (R)
Votes: 24,617
Percent: 31.57%
Rick Murphy (R)
Votes: 13,315
Percent: 17.08%
Prior Winning Percentages
2010 (50%)
Paul Gosar Votes and Bills
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National Journal’s rating system is an objective method of analyzing voting. The liberal score means that the lawmaker’s votes were more liberal than that percentage of his colleagues’ votes. The conservative score means his votes were more conservative than that percentage of his colleagues’ votes. The composite score is an average of a lawmaker’s six issue-based scores. See all NJ Voting

More Liberal
More Conservative
2013 2012 2011
Economic 12 (L) : 87 (C) 13 (L) : 86 (C) 23 (L) : 73 (C)
Social 13 (L) : 84 (C) 21 (L) : 75 (C) 31 (L) : 69 (C)
Foreign 50 (L) : 50 (C) - (L) : 91 (C) - (L) : 91 (C)
Composite 25.7 (L) : 74.3 (C) 13.7 (L) : 86.3 (C) 20.2 (L) : 79.8 (C)
Interest Group Ratings

The vote ratings by 10 special interest groups provide insight into a lawmaker’s general ideology and the degree to which he or she agrees with the group’s point of view. Two organizations provide just one combined rating for 2011 and 2012, the two sessions of the 112th Congress. They are the ACLU and the ITIC. About the interest groups.

20112012
FRC90100
LCV1111
CFG6390
ITIC-64
NTU7687
20112012
COC94-
ACLU-0
ACU8496
ADA020
AFSCME0-
Key House Votes

The key votes show how a member of Congress voted on the major bills of the year. N indicates a "no" vote; Y a "yes" vote. If a member voted "present" or was absent, the bill caption is not shown. For a complete description of the bills included in key votes, see the Almanac's Guide to Usage.

    • Pass GOP budget
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • End fiscal cliff
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • Find AG in contempt
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Stop student loan hike
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • Repeal health care
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Raise debt limit
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Pass cut, cap, balance
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Defund Planned Parenthood
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Repeal lightbulb ban
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Add endangered listings
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Speed troop withdrawal
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
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The Almanac is a members-only database of searchable profiles compiled and adapted from the Almanac of American Politics. Comprehensive online profiles include biographical and political summaries of elected officials, campaign expenditures, voting records, interest-group ratings, and congressional staff look-ups. In-depth overviews of each state and house district are included as well, along with demographic data, analysis of voting trends, and political histories.
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