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Republican

Rep. Blake Farenthold (R)

Blake Farenthold Contact
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Email: n/a
DC Contact Information

Phone: 202-225-7742

Address: 117 CHOB, DC 20515

State Office Contact Information

Phone: (361) 884-2222

Address: 101 North Shoreline Boulevard, Corpus Christi TX 78401-2837

Victoria TX

Phone: (361) 894-6446

Fax: (361) 894-6460

Address: 5606 North Navarro Street, Victoria TX 77904-1758

Blake Farenthold Staff
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Sort by INTEREST NAME TITLE
Adami, Blake
Legislative Director
Adami, Blake
Legislative Director
Adami, Blake
Legislative Director
Wilson, Jeffrey
Legislative Assistant
Adami, Blake
Legislative Director
Adami, Blake
Legislative Director
Wilson, Jeffrey
Legislative Assistant
Wilson, Jeffrey
Legislative Assistant
Adami, Blake
Legislative Director
Adami, Blake
Legislative Director
Wilson, Jeffrey
Legislative Assistant
Wilson, Jeffrey
Legislative Assistant
Wilson, Jeffrey
Legislative Assistant
Adami, Blake
Legislative Director
Carson, Austin
Policy Advisor
Wilson, Jeffrey
Legislative Assistant
Wilson, Jeffrey
Legislative Assistant
Adami, Blake
Legislative Director
Carson, Austin
Policy Advisor
Carson, Austin
Policy Advisor
Adami, Blake
Legislative Director
Carson, Austin
Policy Advisor
Carson, Austin
Policy Advisor
Carson, Austin
Policy Advisor
Adami, Blake
Legislative Director
Adami, Blake
Legislative Director
Adami, Blake
Legislative Director
Adami, Blake
Legislative Director
Adami, Blake
Legislative Director
Wilson, Jeffrey
Legislative Assistant
Wilson, Jeffrey
Legislative Assistant
Wilson, Jeffrey
Legislative Assistant
Adami, Blake
Legislative Director
Adami, Blake
Legislative Director
Carson, Austin
Policy Advisor
Adami, Blake
Legislative Director
Carson, Austin
Policy Advisor
Wilson, Jeffrey
Legislative Assistant
Carson, Austin
Policy Advisor
Adami, Blake
Legislative Director
Carson, Austin
Policy Advisor
Carson, Austin
Policy Advisor
Carson, Austin
Policy Advisor
Carson, Austin
Policy Advisor
Carson, Austin
Policy Advisor
Adami, Blake
Legislative Director
Wilson, Jeffrey
Legislative Assistant
Adami, Blake
Legislative Director
Buentello, Luis
Field Representative
Carson, Austin
Policy Advisor
Coronado, Rene
Veterans Outreach Coordinator
Farias, Jullianna
Constituent Liaison
Haueter, Bob
Chief of Staff
Mitchell, Shawna
Constituent Liaison
Mulopulos, Sam
Staff Assistant
Rekola, Michael
Communications Director
Rieg, Kevin
Legislative Correspondent
Wilson, Jeffrey
Legislative Assistant
Wootton, Carol
Field Representative
Carson, Austin
Policy Advisor
Haueter, Bob
Chief of Staff
Rekola, Michael
Communications Director
Coronado, Rene
Veterans Outreach Coordinator
Wilson, Jeffrey
Legislative Assistant
Rieg, Kevin
Legislative Correspondent
Adami, Blake
Legislative Director
Farias, Jullianna
Constituent Liaison
Mitchell, Shawna
Constituent Liaison
Buentello, Luis
Field Representative
Wootton, Carol
Field Representative
Mulopulos, Sam
Staff Assistant
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Blake Farenthold Committees
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Blake Farenthold Biography
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  • Elected: 2010, 2nd term.
  • District: Texas 27
  • Born: Dec. 12, 1961, Corpus Christi
  • Home: Corpus Christi
  • Education:

    U. of TX, B.A. 1985, St. Mary's U., J.D. 1989.

  • Professional Career:

    Practicing atty., 1989-95; Owner, Farenthold LLC, 1995-2010; Radio host, 1999-2010.

  • Ethnicity: White/Caucasian
  • Religion:

    Episcopalian

  • Family: Married (Debbie); 2 children

Republican Blake Farenthold edged out 14-term Democratic Rep. Solomon Ortiz in one of the most surprising GOP wins of 2010, and then emerged as the big winner in Texas redistricting with a more solidly Republican district. Read More

Republican Blake Farenthold edged out 14-term Democratic Rep. Solomon Ortiz in one of the most surprising GOP wins of 2010, and then emerged as the big winner in Texas redistricting with a more solidly Republican district.

Farenthold was born and raised in Corpus Christi, where his family has farmed for three generations. His father died when Farenthold was 11 years old, and his mother raised him and his younger sister alone. His family is known for strong women. His grandfather’s second wife is Sissy Farenthold, a Democratic state legislator and a pioneer of the women’s rights movement who was a serious contender to be George McGovern’s presidential running mate in 1972.

Blake Farenthold studied radio, film, and television at the University of Texas in Austin. After earning his law degree, Farenthold joined his step-grandfather’s law practice, focusing on agricultural law. He became dissatisfied with the legal profession, and in 1995, launched a computer consulting and website design firm. In the late 1990s, he also began dabbling in radio again, appearing as an occasional guest on a morning show to talk about computer-related issues. The job gradually became more regular until Farenthold became a sidekick on the program Lago in the Morning on Corpus Christi’s news radio station KKTX. Farenthold aired many of his conservative views and gained local name recognition.

He was motivated by his opposition to the national Democrats’ health care overhaul to run for Congress in 2010. He faced a tough fight for the Republican nomination against Corpus Christi real estate agent James Duerr, who campaigned on a similarly conservative platform. Duerr edged out Farenthold in the March primary by 2 percentage points, but Farenthold prevailed in the April runoff, 51%-49%, after drawing on his personal wealth (the Center for Responsive Politics estimated his average net worth for 2011 at more than $24 million) to outspend Duerr.

In the general election against Ortiz, Farenthold was a decided underdog. Ortiz had built a moderate voting record in a Hispanic-majority district, and he was a senior member of the Armed Services Committee who had shepherded money to local projects. The incumbent also had a considerable fundraising advantage. Farenthold raised $616,000, including about $150,000 from his own pocket, compared with Ortiz’s $1.2 million.

The Republican’s campaign also suffered a credibility deficit after images surfaced of Farenthold wearing pajamas featuring yellow ducks while out for a night on the town with a young woman wearing what appeared to be a sheer nightie. Ortiz touted the photograph, which was widely circulated on the Internet, in his campaign ads as evidence that his opponent could not be taken seriously. But Farenthold’s campaign picked up steam with the support of local tea party activists. On Election Night, the contest was too close to call, and a recount was ordered. Ortiz conceded to Farenthold on November 22 after the recount showed the incumbent behind by 799 votes.

In the House, the first bill Farenthold introduced would require federal agencies to display receipts and expenditures every two weeks on their websites. He also actively supported legislative riders attached to the fiscal 2011 funding bill, including one to ban funding for Planned Parenthood. He became disillusioned with House Republicans’ inability to cut spending deep enough to his liking. “What I’m coming to realize is that all we’re really able to do is put the brakes on,” he said in Robert Draper’s 2012 book Do Not Ask What Good We Do. “Imagine going real fast in a Flintstones car, and my heel is out there. I went to Washington to change the world, and all I can do is put my heel out.” He also lamented what he saw as the party’s inability to get its message across: “What the Democrats can say in two emotion-packed sentences take us 10 PowerPoint slides.”

He took over in 2013 as chairman of the Oversight and Government Reform Committee’s panel on the federal workforce and expressed concerns about agencies’ spending on outside conferences. He also sponsored a bill to shield federal workers from furloughs as a result of automatic and steep budget cuts that kicked in that spring after the White House and Congress failed to reach a budget accord.

Farenthold initially was a top Democratic target in 2012. But the final court-approved Texas redistricting map gave his district— which had been 73% Hispanic—a strong GOP bent by stretching it north along the Gulf Coast. It also kept out precincts in suburban Houston, enabling him to avoid a serious primary challenge. He beat Democrat Rose Meza Harrison 57%-39%.

Show Less
Blake Farenthold Election Results
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2012 General
Blake Farenthold (R)
Votes: 120,684
Percent: 56.75%
Rose Harrison (D)
Votes: 83,395
Percent: 39.22%
Bret Baldwin (I)
Votes: 5,354
Percent: 2.52%
2012 Primary
Blake Farenthold (R)
Votes: 28,058
Percent: 70.78%
Trey Roberts (R)
Votes: 4,653
Percent: 11.74%
Don Middlebrook (R)
Votes: 3,676
Percent: 9.27%
John Grunwald (R)
Votes: 3,256
Percent: 8.21%
Prior Winning Percentages
2010 (48%)
Blake Farenthold Votes and Bills
Back to top NJ Vote Ratings

National Journal’s rating system is an objective method of analyzing voting. The liberal score means that the lawmaker’s votes were more liberal than that percentage of his colleagues’ votes. The conservative score means his votes were more conservative than that percentage of his colleagues’ votes. The composite score is an average of a lawmaker’s six issue-based scores. See all NJ Voting

More Liberal
More Conservative
2013 2012 2011
Economic 21 (L) : 77 (C) 7 (L) : 91 (C) 29 (L) : 71 (C)
Social 31 (L) : 67 (C) 28 (L) : 70 (C) 17 (L) : 74 (C)
Foreign 34 (L) : 60 (C) 20 (L) : 73 (C) 43 (L) : 54 (C)
Composite 30.3 (L) : 69.7 (C) 20.2 (L) : 79.8 (C) 31.7 (L) : 68.3 (C)
Interest Group Ratings

The vote ratings by 10 special interest groups provide insight into a lawmaker’s general ideology and the degree to which he or she agrees with the group’s point of view. Two organizations provide just one combined rating for 2011 and 2012, the two sessions of the 112th Congress. They are the ACLU and the ITIC. About the interest groups.

20112012
FRC90100
LCV99
CFG6580
ITIC-75
NTU7579
20112012
COC100-
ACLU-0
ACU8084
ADA105
AFSCME0-
Key House Votes

The key votes show how a member of Congress voted on the major bills of the year. N indicates a "no" vote; Y a "yes" vote. If a member voted "present" or was absent, the bill caption is not shown. For a complete description of the bills included in key votes, see the Almanac's Guide to Usage.

    • Pass GOP budget
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • End fiscal cliff
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • Extend payroll tax cut
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • Find AG in contempt
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Stop student loan hike
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Repeal health care
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Raise debt limit
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Pass cut, cap, balance
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Defund Planned Parenthood
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Repeal lightbulb ban
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Add endangered listings
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Speed troop withdrawal
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
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The Almanac is a members-only database of searchable profiles compiled and adapted from the Almanac of American Politics. Comprehensive online profiles include biographical and political summaries of elected officials, campaign expenditures, voting records, interest-group ratings, and congressional staff look-ups. In-depth overviews of each state and house district are included as well, along with demographic data, analysis of voting trends, and political histories.
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