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Republican

Rep. Vicky Hartzler (R)

Vicky Hartzler Contact
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Email: n/a
DC Contact Information

Phone: 202-225-2876

Address: 1023 LHOB, DC 20515

State Office Contact Information

Phone: (573) 442-9311

Address: 2415 Carter Lane, Columbia MO 65201

Harrisonville MO

Phone: (816) 884-3411

Fax: (816) 884-3163

Address: 1909 North Commercial Street, Harrisonville MO 64701-1252

Lebanon MO

Phone: (417) 532-5582

Fax: (417) 532-3886

Address: 219 North Adams Street, Lebanon MO 65536-3029

Vicky Hartzler Staff
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Tvrdy, Joe
Legislative Assistant
Alber, Alexis
Legislative Assistant
Tvrdy, Joe
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Tvrdy, Joe
Legislative Assistant
Alber, Alexis
Legislative Assistant
Alber, Alexis
Legislative Assistant
Alber, Alexis
Legislative Assistant
Alber, Alexis
Legislative Assistant
Burgess, Daniel
Legislative Director
Alber, Alexis
Legislative Assistant
Alber, Alexis
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Burgess, Daniel
Legislative Director
Alber, Alexis
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Tvrdy, Joe
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Tvrdy, Joe
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Burgess, Daniel
Legislative Director
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Alber, Alexis
Legislative Assistant
Tvrdy, Joe
Legislative Assistant
Burgess, Daniel
Legislative Director
Alber, Alexis
Legislative Assistant
Alber, Alexis
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Alber, Alexis
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Alber, Alexis
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Alber, Alexis
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Burgess, Daniel
Legislative Director
Tvrdy, Joe
Legislative Assistant
Alber, Alexis
Legislative Assistant
Alber, Alexis
Legislative Assistant
McClanahan, Shaelyn
Deputy Chief of Staff
Burgess, Daniel
Legislative Director
Burgess, Daniel
Legislative Director
Burgess, Daniel
Legislative Director
Tvrdy, Joe
Legislative Assistant
Alber, Alexis
Legislative Assistant
Tvrdy, Joe
Legislative Assistant
Tvrdy, Joe
Legislative Assistant
Alber, Alexis
Legislative Assistant
Alber, Alexis
Legislative Assistant
Alber, Alexis
Legislative Assistant
Alber, Alexis
Legislative Assistant
Burgess, Daniel
Legislative Director
Tvrdy, Joe
Legislative Assistant
Tvrdy, Joe
Legislative Assistant
Tvrdy, Joe
Legislative Assistant
McClanahan, Shaelyn
Deputy Chief of Staff
Burgess, Daniel
Legislative Director
Tvrdy, Joe
Legislative Assistant
Alber, Alexis
Legislative Assistant
Tvrdy, Joe
Legislative Assistant
Burgess, Daniel
Legislative Director
Burgess, Daniel
Legislative Director
Burgess, Daniel
Legislative Director
Burgess, Daniel
Legislative Director
Burgess, Daniel
Legislative Director
McClanahan, Shaelyn
Deputy Chief of Staff
Tvrdy, Joe
Legislative Assistant
Burgess, Daniel
Legislative Director
Tvrdy, Joe
Legislative Assistant
Tvrdy, Joe
Legislative Assistant
Alber, Alexis
Legislative Assistant
Alber, Alexis
Legislative Assistant
Bohl, Eric
Chief of Staff
Brown, Zack
Field Representative; Travel Aide
Buckles, Kyle
Communications Director
Burgess, Daniel
Legislative Director
Burkett, Bob
Staff Assistant
Kramer, Austin
Field Representative
McClanahan, Shaelyn
Deputy Chief of Staff
Tvrdy, Joe
Legislative Assistant
Walsh, Steve
Press Secretary; Field Representative
Wolford, Jason
Legislative Correspondent
Brown, Zack
Field Representative; Travel Aide
Bohl, Eric
Chief of Staff
Buckles, Kyle
Communications Director
McClanahan, Shaelyn
Deputy Chief of Staff
Alber, Alexis
Legislative Assistant
Tvrdy, Joe
Legislative Assistant
Wolford, Jason
Legislative Correspondent
Burgess, Daniel
Legislative Director
Walsh, Steve
Press Secretary; Field Representative
Brown, Zack
Field Representative; Travel Aide
Kramer, Austin
Field Representative
Walsh, Steve
Press Secretary; Field Representative
Burkett, Bob
Staff Assistant
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Vicky Hartzler Committees
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Vicky Hartzler Biography
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  • Elected: 2010, 2nd term.
  • District: Missouri 4
  • Born: Oct. 13, 1960, Archie
  • Home: Harrisonville
  • Education:

    U. of MO, B.S. 1983; U. of Central MO, M.S. 1992.

  • Professional Career:

    Teacher, 1983-94; spokeswoman, Coalition to Protect Marriage, 2004; appointee, MO Women's Cncl., 2005-2010; owner, Hartzler Equipment Co.

  • Political Career:

    MO House 1995-2001.

  • Ethnicity: White/Caucasian
  • Religion:

    Christian

  • Family: Married (Lowell); 1 children

Republican Vicky Hartzler scored one of the biggest upsets of 2010 when she defeated 17-term Democrat Ike Skelton, the powerful chairman of the Armed Services Committee. A former activist who led the movement to ban same-sex marriage in Missouri, she has been an energetic social and fiscal conservative. Read More

Republican Vicky Hartzler scored one of the biggest upsets of 2010 when she defeated 17-term Democrat Ike Skelton, the powerful chairman of the Armed Services Committee. A former activist who led the movement to ban same-sex marriage in Missouri, she has been an energetic social and fiscal conservative.

Hartzler has spent her entire life in rural Cass County, where she grew up working alongside her parents and sister on the family farm. Faith was a cornerstone of the household. “As farmers, we prayed for rain, and when it rained too much, we relied on prayer to hope that we had a crop that year,” she told National Journal. In high school, she excelled in athletics, captained the girls’ volleyball and basketball teams, and was a member of the track team. She was also editor of the school yearbook and president of the Future Homemakers of America. After getting her bachelor’s degree in education, Vicky married Lowell Hartzler, her college sweetheart, and went to work as a high school home economics teacher. She remained in the classroom for 11 years. The trajectory of her career changed in 1994, however, when Hartzler got a phone call from a friend while she was grading papers, urging her to run to be the district’s state representative. “He asked me to think about it and pray about it, and I did,” she said. “After 30 days, I knew I was supposed to run.”

Hartzler served three terms in Missouri’s House and counts overhauling Missouri’s outdated adoption statutes among her proudest accomplishments. In 2000, Hartzler decided not to run for reelection after her daughter, Tiffany, was born. Hartzler and her husband live on a 1,600-acre farm outside of Harrisonville, where they raise corn, soybeans, and cattle, and run the Hartzler Equipment Co., which sells farming equipment.

In 2004, Hartzler headed the Coalition to Protect Marriage in Missouri, a campaign to add an amendment to the state’s constitution banning same-sex marriage. Despite being outspent 17-to-1 by opposition groups, the amendment passed with 71% of the vote. The liberal magazine Mother Jones headlined an article about her in October 2010, “Is Vicky Hartzler the Most Anti-Gay Candidate in America?” She wrote the book Running God’s Way: Step by Step to a Successful Political Campaign, a detailed guide for Christian candidates published in 2008.

Hartzler’s bid to unseat Skelton in 2010 drew tea party interest. In the conservative district, Skelton had relied on crossover GOP voters in the past, but in an election year that went from bad to worse for Democrats, Hartzler’s message resonated. She assailed Skelton on his votes with “the liberal leadership” for the $787 billion economic stimulus bill and an energy bill imposing caps on carbon emissions blamed for global warming. “I don’t have a ‘To Do list,’ I have an ‘Undo list,” she said. “We have to undo all these destructive policies.”

The 78-year-old Skelton, who had gotten 62% of the vote or better since 1982, was wise to the threat. He ran an aggressive campaign, with a full schedule of appearances allowing him to emphasize his work on behalf of the military as Armed Services chairman. Hartzler tried to turn his image as a wise legislative elder into a negative, saying in her stump speech, “So many people in Washington (are) removed from rural America. Ike’s lost touch.” Skelton raised $3 million and outspent Hartzler 3-to-1. He maintained a steady lead in the polls. But then in late October, the race tightened, a sobering bit of news for Democrats who thought Skelton was safe. Hartzler prevailed on Election Night, 50% to 45%, with the remaining votes split by two minor candidates.

In the House, Republican leaders made good on their promise to give Hartzler a seat on Armed Services so she could continue Skelton’s stewardship of the district’s military bases. She added a provision to the House’s fiscal 2012 defense bill defining marriage as a union between a man and a woman for the purpose of military benefits and policy. The provision was dropped in conference with the Senate. She also introduced a bill preventing military veterans convicted of sexual abuse of children from being buried in Arlington National Cemetery. At a Family Research Council event in January 2012, she told anti-abortion rights activists she endorsed the controversial practice of using photos of aborted fetuses to make their points. “I’m a big believer in visuals,” she said.

After supporting Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan’s budget-cutting efforts, Hartzler picked up a seat on the committee in 2013. She was among the Republicans to dig in their heels and oppose the New Year’s Day 2013 bipartisan compromise aimed at averting the so-called “fiscal cliff.” During debate on the budget in 2011, she invoked the phrase “absolute power corrupts absolutely” in comparing President Barack Obama to a tyrant. A year later, she stoked another controversy when she told a town hall audience that she doubted the authenticity of the president’s birth certificate, “and I think a lot of Americans do.”

Under post-2010 census redistricting, Hartzler was forced to take on Democratic-leaning Columbia in her district, which was done to make other Republican districts safer. But she picked up more of her home base in Cass County from the old 5th District, and the newly drawn 4th remained solidly conservative. In the 2012 election, Democrat Teresa Hensley, Cass County’s prosecutor, stood little chance. Hartzler won 60%-35%, with two minor-party candidates again taking the rest.

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Vicky Hartzler Election Results
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2012 General
Vicky Hartzler (R)
Votes: 192,237
Percent: 60.31%
Teresa Hensley (D)
Votes: 113,120
Percent: 35.49%
Thomas Holbrook (Lib)
Votes: 10,407
Percent: 3.27%
2012 Primary
Vicky Hartzler (R)
Votes: 71,615
Percent: 84.0%
Bernie Mowinski (R)
Votes: 13,645
Percent: 16.0%
Prior Winning Percentages
2010 (50%)
Vicky Hartzler Votes and Bills
Back to top NJ Vote Ratings

National Journal’s rating system is an objective method of analyzing voting. The liberal score means that the lawmaker’s votes were more liberal than that percentage of his colleagues’ votes. The conservative score means his votes were more conservative than that percentage of his colleagues’ votes. The composite score is an average of a lawmaker’s six issue-based scores. See all NJ Voting

More Liberal
More Conservative
2013 2012 2011
Economic 21 (L) : 77 (C) 23 (L) : 75 (C) 29 (L) : 70 (C)
Social - (L) : 87 (C) 34 (L) : 64 (C) 27 (L) : 71 (C)
Foreign 34 (L) : 60 (C) 9 (L) : 86 (C) - (L) : 91 (C)
Composite 21.8 (L) : 78.2 (C) 23.5 (L) : 76.5 (C) 20.7 (L) : 79.3 (C)
Interest Group Ratings

The vote ratings by 10 special interest groups provide insight into a lawmaker’s general ideology and the degree to which he or she agrees with the group’s point of view. Two organizations provide just one combined rating for 2011 and 2012, the two sessions of the 112th Congress. They are the ACLU and the ITIC. About the interest groups.

20112012
FRC90100
LCV93
CFG7078
ITIC-75
NTU7478
20112012
COC87-
ACLU-0
ACU8880
ADA50
AFSCME0-
Key House Votes

The key votes show how a member of Congress voted on the major bills of the year. N indicates a "no" vote; Y a "yes" vote. If a member voted "present" or was absent, the bill caption is not shown. For a complete description of the bills included in key votes, see the Almanac's Guide to Usage.

    • Pass GOP budget
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • End fiscal cliff
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • Extend payroll tax cut
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Find AG in contempt
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Stop student loan hike
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Repeal health care
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Raise debt limit
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Pass cut, cap, balance
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Defund Planned Parenthood
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Repeal lightbulb ban
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Add endangered listings
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Speed troop withdrawal
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
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The Almanac is a members-only database of searchable profiles compiled and adapted from the Almanac of American Politics. Comprehensive online profiles include biographical and political summaries of elected officials, campaign expenditures, voting records, interest-group ratings, and congressional staff look-ups. In-depth overviews of each state and house district are included as well, along with demographic data, analysis of voting trends, and political histories.
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