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Republican

Rep. Diane Black (R)

Diane Black Contact
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Email: n/a
DC Contact Information

Phone: 202-225-4231

Address: 1531 LHOB, DC 20515

Websites: black.house.gov
State Office Contact Information

Phone: (615) 206-8204

Address: 355 North Belvedere Drive, Gallatin TN 37066-5466

Cookeville TN

Phone: (931) 854-0069

Fax: (615) 206-8980

Address: 321 East Spring Street, Cookeville TN 38501-4168

Diane Black Staff
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Sort by INTEREST NAME TITLE
Allen, Kathryn
Senior Legislative Assistant
Parkinson, Zach
Legislative Correspondent
Ludwig, Mary Anne
Legislative Assistant
Allen, Kathryn
Senior Legislative Assistant
Cogan, Robert
Legislative Director
Cogan, Robert
Legislative Director
Allen, Kathryn
Senior Legislative Assistant
Cogan, Robert
Legislative Director
Cogan, Robert
Legislative Director
Ludwig, Mary Anne
Legislative Assistant
Cogan, Robert
Legislative Director
Ludwig, Mary Anne
Legislative Assistant
Ludwig, Mary Anne
Legislative Assistant
Ludwig, Mary Anne
Legislative Assistant
Ludwig, Mary Anne
Legislative Assistant
Cogan, Robert
Legislative Director
Parkinson, Zach
Legislative Correspondent
Cogan, Robert
Legislative Director
Parkinson, Zach
Legislative Correspondent
Cogan, Robert
Legislative Director
Allen, Kathryn
Senior Legislative Assistant
Ludwig, Mary Anne
Legislative Assistant
Allen, Kathryn
Senior Legislative Assistant
Cogan, Robert
Legislative Director
Ludwig, Mary Anne
Legislative Assistant
Ludwig, Mary Anne
Legislative Assistant
Cogan, Robert
Legislative Director
Cogan, Robert
Legislative Director
Cogan, Robert
Legislative Director
Cogan, Robert
Legislative Director
Allen, Kathryn
Senior Legislative Assistant
Ludwig, Mary Anne
Legislative Assistant
Ludwig, Mary Anne
Legislative Assistant
Cogan, Robert
Legislative Director
Ludwig, Mary Anne
Legislative Assistant
Ludwig, Mary Anne
Legislative Assistant
Ludwig, Mary Anne
Legislative Assistant
Cogan, Robert
Legislative Director
Ludwig, Mary Anne
Legislative Assistant
Ludwig, Mary Anne
Legislative Assistant
Cogan, Robert
Legislative Director
Cogan, Robert
Legislative Director
Cogan, Robert
Legislative Director
Ludwig, Mary Anne
Legislative Assistant
Ludwig, Mary Anne
Legislative Assistant
Ludwig, Mary Anne
Legislative Assistant
Ludwig, Mary Anne
Legislative Assistant
Ludwig, Mary Anne
Legislative Assistant
Allen, Kathryn
Senior Legislative Assistant
Allen, Kathryn
Senior Legislative Assistant
Burch, Ace
Staff Assistant
Cogan, Robert
Legislative Director
Detwiler, Michael
Field Representative
Gardner, Wills
Field Representative
Ludwig, Mary Anne
Legislative Assistant
Parkinson, Zach
Legislative Correspondent
Allen, Kathryn
Senior Legislative Assistant
Ludwig, Mary Anne
Legislative Assistant
Parkinson, Zach
Legislative Correspondent
Cogan, Robert
Legislative Director
Detwiler, Michael
Field Representative
Gardner, Wills
Field Representative
Burch, Ace
Staff Assistant
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Diane Black Committees
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Diane Black Biography
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  • Elected: 2010, 2nd term.
  • District: Tennessee 6
  • Born: Jan. 16, 1951, Baltimore, MD
  • Home: Gallatin
  • Education:

    Anne Arundel Col., A.S. 1971; Belmont U., B.A. 1992.

  • Professional Career:

    Registered nurse, 1969-2010; Dir., Sumner Regional Health Systems, 1993-98; owner, Ebon-Falcon.

  • Political Career:

    TN House, 1998-2004; TN Senate, 2004-10.

  • Ethnicity: White/Caucasian
  • Religion:

    Lutheran

  • Family: Married (David); 3 children

Diane Black, a Republican elected in 2010, is an active social conservative and has a background in health care, which helped land her a coveted seat on the Ways and Means Committee. Read More

Diane Black, a Republican elected in 2010, is an active social conservative and has a background in health care, which helped land her a coveted seat on the Ways and Means Committee.

Black was born in Baltimore and lived in the area for most of her early life. She obtained an associate’s degree in nursing from a local community college in 1971. In 1985, she and her business executive husband, David Black, moved to Tennessee. Black returned to school to get her bachelor’s degree in nursing from Belmont University. She got into politics in 1998, when she was elected to the first of three terms in the Tennessee House. By 2001, she was involved in an anti-tax protest that foreshadowed her involvement in the tea party eight years later. In 2004, Black moved up to the state Senate.

During her six-year tenure, she became the first woman to chair the Senate Republican Caucus. She also earned her stripes as a small-government conservative, repeatedly voting against a state income tax and increases to the state sales tax. Late in the 2010 General Assembly session, Black championed an unsuccessful bill to allow Tennessee residents to opt out of the federal health care law. She pushed for a traditional definition of marriage, a zero tolerance policy for illegal immigrants, and a balanced budget constitutional amendment.

When conservative Democratic Rep. Bart Gordon retired after a 25-year career, Black decided to run for the seat. Black’s campaign hit an initial bump when one of her legislative aides sent a racist e-mail from her government account portraying President Barack Obama as two eyes peering out of a black background in a presidential portrait. The incident received widespread media coverage, and Black reprimanded the staffer but did not fire her. Black subsequently survived a bruising three-way GOP primary with 31% of the vote, edging out second-place finisher Lou Ann Zelenik by 283 votes. Zelenik, the Rutherford County GOP chair, drew considerable attention for making her opposition to a local Muslim community center a top issue and accusing Black of not taking a strong enough stand against it.

In the general election, Black’s conservative views made her a tea party favorite, and she racked up endorsement from Republican luminaries, including former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin and Sen. Lamar Alexander of Tennessee. In calling for repeal of the health care law, Black invoked her experience a nurse in emergency rooms. She raised $2.4 million, with more than half coming from her own wallet and more than 10 times the amount mustered by her opponent, Iraq war veteran Brett Carter. She won 67% to 29%, carrying every county in the district.

In the House, Black was named as one of four freshmen regional directors of the National Republican Congressional Committee in recognition of her fundraising acumen. She is among the House’s richest members—the Center for Responsive Politics calculated her average net worth in 2011 at $64 million. But she cares little for the trappings of wealth; according to Robert Draper’s 2012 book Do Not Ask What Good We Do, her choice of transportation as a freshman was a well-worn Oldsmobile. She was among those tied in National Journal’s rankings for the House’s most-conservative member in 2011 (she was 26th in 2012).

Her first piece of legislation was a bill to deny federal funding to Planned Parenthood because of the group’s involvement with abortion —an issue that eventually became one of the main sticking points in a final budget deal between Obama and House Republicans that year. She ended up introducing half a dozen other abortion-related bills. She also sponsored a measure in 2013 to give any individual or group that opposes contraception an automatic exemption from the requirement in the health care law that employee health insurance plans provide birth control. And the House passed her amendment in 2012 to prevent the Obama administration from challenging state immigration laws in court. With a seat on the Budget Committee, she staunchly defended GOP Chairman Paul Ryan’s effort to cut more than $6 trillion in spending.

Zelenik returned for another primary challenge in 2012, once again making her opposition to the Islamic Center of Murfreesboro a focal point. She found a wealthy ally in Tennessee multimillionaire Andy Miller, who also paid for ads attacking Black for supporting a hike in the federal debt limit. But post-2010 redistricting removed Zelenik’s base of Rutherford County from the 6th District, and Black won a suspense-free 69%-31% primary. Democrats didn’t bother to field a general election candidate.

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Diane Black Election Results
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2012 General
Diane Black (R)
Votes: 184,383
Percent: 76.43%
Scott Beasley (I)
Votes: 34,766
Percent: 14.41%
Pat Riley (Green)
Votes: 21,633
Percent: 8.97%
2012 Primary
Diane Black (R)
Votes: 44,949
Percent: 69.38%
Prior Winning Percentages
2010 (67%)
Diane Black Votes and Bills
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National Journal’s rating system is an objective method of analyzing voting. The liberal score means that the lawmaker’s votes were more liberal than that percentage of his colleagues’ votes. The conservative score means his votes were more conservative than that percentage of his colleagues’ votes. The composite score is an average of a lawmaker’s six issue-based scores. See all NJ Voting

More Liberal
More Conservative
2013 2012 2011
Economic 18 (L) : 80 (C) 11 (L) : 87 (C) - (L) : 90 (C)
Social - (L) : 87 (C) 14 (L) : 85 (C) - (L) : 83 (C)
Foreign - (L) : 95 (C) - (L) : 91 (C) - (L) : 91 (C)
Composite 9.3 (L) : 90.7 (C) 10.3 (L) : 89.7 (C) 6.0 (L) : 94.0 (C)
Interest Group Ratings

The vote ratings by 10 special interest groups provide insight into a lawmaker’s general ideology and the degree to which he or she agrees with the group’s point of view. Two organizations provide just one combined rating for 2011 and 2012, the two sessions of the 112th Congress. They are the ACLU and the ITIC. About the interest groups.

20112012
FRC90100
LCV99
CFG7189
ITIC-70
NTU7583
20112012
COC100-
ACLU-0
ACU84100
ADA55
AFSCME0-
Key House Votes

The key votes show how a member of Congress voted on the major bills of the year. N indicates a "no" vote; Y a "yes" vote. If a member voted "present" or was absent, the bill caption is not shown. For a complete description of the bills included in key votes, see the Almanac's Guide to Usage.

    • Pass GOP budget
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • End fiscal cliff
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • Extend payroll tax cut
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • Find AG in contempt
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Stop student loan hike
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • Repeal health care
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Raise debt limit
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Pass cut, cap, balance
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Defund Planned Parenthood
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Repeal lightbulb ban
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Add endangered listings
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Speed troop withdrawal
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
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The Almanac is a members-only database of searchable profiles compiled and adapted from the Almanac of American Politics. Comprehensive online profiles include biographical and political summaries of elected officials, campaign expenditures, voting records, interest-group ratings, and congressional staff look-ups. In-depth overviews of each state and house district are included as well, along with demographic data, analysis of voting trends, and political histories.
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