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Republican

Rep. Tim Walberg (R)

Tim Walberg Contact
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Email: n/a
DC Contact Information

Phone: 202-225-6276

Address: 2436 RHOB, DC 20515

State Office Contact Information

Phone: (517) 780-9075

Address: 110 1st Street, Jackson MI 49201

Tim Walberg Staff
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Hirte, Jonathan
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Hirte, Jonathan
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Hirte, Jonathan
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Armstrong, Evan
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Armstrong, Evan
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Hirte, Jonathan
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Armstrong, Evan
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Armstrong, Evan
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Armstrong, Evan
Legislative Counsel
Armstrong, Evan
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Hirte, Jonathan
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Armstrong, Evan
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Hirte, Jonathan
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Brown, Joanna
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Armstrong, Evan
Legislative Counsel
Hirte, Jonathan
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Brown, Joanna
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Armstrong, Evan
Legislative Counsel
Armstrong, Evan
Legislative Counsel
Hirte, Jonathan
Legislative Director
Hirte, Jonathan
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Tim Walberg Committees
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Tim Walberg Biography
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  • Elected: 2010, 3rd term.
  • District: Michigan 7
  • Born: Apr. 12, 1951, Chicago, IL
  • Home: Tipton
  • Education:

    Fort Wayne Bible Col., B.S. 1975; Wheaton Col., M.A. 1978.

  • Professional Career:

    Minister, 1973-82; pres., Warren Reuther Center, 1999-2000; division mgr., Moody Bible Inst., 2000-05.

  • Political Career:

    MI House, 1982-98; U.S. House, 2007-09.

  • Ethnicity: White/Caucasian
  • Religion:

    Christian

  • Family: Married (Sue); 3 children

Republican Tim Walberg is an ardent social and fiscal conservative who was first elected in 2006. He lost narrowly two years later to Democrat Mark Schauer and then reclaimed the seat in 2010. Read More

Republican Tim Walberg is an ardent social and fiscal conservative who was first elected in 2006. He lost narrowly two years later to Democrat Mark Schauer and then reclaimed the seat in 2010.

Walberg was born in Chicago, growing up on the city’s South Side. He worked in a steel mill to get through college and ultimately got degrees from Fort Wayne Bible College and Wheaton College. He was a minister for 10 years before running for office for the first time. In 1982, he won a seat in the Michigan House by beating a moderate GOP incumbent. In his 16 years as a state legislator, Walberg had a reputation as a tireless advocate for gun rights, an opponent of abortion rights, and a foe of reckless government spending. He belonged to a group dubbed the “No” caucus for its unflinching opposition to tax hikes and increased spending. Term limits put an end to his tenure, and from 1998 to 2005, he was president of a conservative education foundation and a division manager for the Moody Bible Institute of Chicago.

Walberg made a bid for the 7th District seat in 2004 when Republican Rep. Nick Smith retired after 12 years. He came in third in a GOP primary field crowded with other conservatives, and moderate Republican Joe Schwarz went on to win the general election. Two years later, Walberg tried again. In a primary challenge reminiscent of 2010’s tea party-fueled campaigns, he ran on a record of having never once voted for a tax increase in the legislature. The well-funded anti-tax Club for Growth took notice and poured $500,000 into television ads attacking Schwarz. The national GOP backed the incumbent, and Schwarz had a spending advantage of 2-to-1. Walberg nevertheless prevailed and went on to defeat a weak Democratic opponent, 50% to 46%. He became a prime target for Democrats in 2008.

That year, Democrats nominated Schauer, the Michigan Senate’s minority leader and a former community organizer. With unemployment rising, Schauer focused on the economy and secured an endorsement from Republican Schwarz. Schauer also benefited from the favorable national environment for Democrats and the enthusiasm generated by then-Illinois Sen. Barack Obama’s campaign for president. The Club for Growth again spent heavily for Walberg, but Schauer had strong union support and eked out a win, 49% to 46%.

Walberg came back for a rematch in 2010 in a much more favorable climate for his party. In August, he won a three-way Republican primary with 57% of the vote. In the general election, Walberg and his allies attacked Schauer for his vote for Obama’s $787 billion economic stimulus bill, saying that he was part of the problem of deficit spending in Washington. Schauer and his backers portrayed Walberg as too far right for the district, highlighting his support for privatizing Social Security. They also spotlighted a September radio interview in which Walberg said he didn’t know whether Obama is an American citizen. “We don’t have enough information about this president,” he said. By day’s end, he reversed course and acknowledged that Obama is “certainly an American citizen.”

Outside groups and both national parties showered money on the race. And on Election Day, Walberg won the seat back, 50% to 45%.

In the House, Walberg has had one of the most conservative voting records among the Michigan delegation’s Republicans. His amendment proposing to cut National Endowment for the Arts by more than $20 million narrowly passed the House in February 2011 but went nowhere in the Democratic-controlled Senate. He also introduced a resolution expressing support for prayer at school board meetings. On the Oversight and Government Reform Committee, Walberg expressed the popularly held view among the far right that the botched “Operation Fast and Furious” operation intending to trace guns actually was designed to take away gun owners’ rights. As chairman of the Education and the Workforce’s Subcommittee on Workforce Protections, he joined panel Chairman John Kline of Minnesota in 2011 in arguing that the Obama administration’s proposal giving home-care workers minimum wage and overtime protections would result in reduced hours for workers and higher costs for taxpayers. He later helped block a Labor Department proposal to ban youths younger than 16 from working on family farms.

Schauer declined a rematch 2012 after Michigan’s GOP redistricters moved Schauer’s Battle Creek home into the 3rd District. In the GOP primary, Walberg easily beat former police officer Dan Davis, setting up a general election matchup against Democratic attorney Kurt Haskell. Walberg refused to debate Haskell, citing Haskell’s claim that the federal government was involved in supplying a faulty explosive to the so-called “underwear bomber” who tried to set off a bomb aboard an airplane in 2009. Despite raising $1.5 million to Haskell’s $101,000, Walberg won with just 53% of the vote, a potential sign he could vulnerable in the future.

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Tim Walberg Election Results
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2012 General
Tim Walberg (R)
Votes: 169,668
Percent: 53.34%
Kurt Haskell (D)
Votes: 136,849
Percent: 43.02%
Ken Proctor
Votes: 8,088
Percent: 2.54%
2012 Primary
Tim Walberg (R)
Votes: 45,592
Percent: 76.01%
Dan Davis (R)
Votes: 14,386
Percent: 23.99%
Prior Winning Percentages
2010 (50%), 2006 (50%)
Tim Walberg Votes and Bills
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National Journal’s rating system is an objective method of analyzing voting. The liberal score means that the lawmaker’s votes were more liberal than that percentage of his colleagues’ votes. The conservative score means his votes were more conservative than that percentage of his colleagues’ votes. The composite score is an average of a lawmaker’s six issue-based scores. See all NJ Voting

More Liberal
More Conservative
2013 2012 2011
Economic 23 (L) : 77 (C) 11 (L) : 87 (C) 23 (L) : 73 (C)
Social - (L) : 87 (C) 14 (L) : 85 (C) - (L) : 83 (C)
Foreign 5 (L) : 86 (C) 16 (L) : 81 (C) 9 (L) : 86 (C)
Composite 13.0 (L) : 87.0 (C) 14.7 (L) : 85.3 (C) 15.0 (L) : 85.0 (C)
Interest Group Ratings

The vote ratings by 10 special interest groups provide insight into a lawmaker’s general ideology and the degree to which he or she agrees with the group’s point of view. Two organizations provide just one combined rating for 2011 and 2012, the two sessions of the 112th Congress. They are the ACLU and the ITIC. About the interest groups.

20112012
FRC10066
LCV69
CFG8687
ITIC-83
NTU8384
20112012
COC100-
ACLU-0
ACU9696
ADA55
AFSCME0-
Key House Votes

The key votes show how a member of Congress voted on the major bills of the year. N indicates a "no" vote; Y a "yes" vote. If a member voted "present" or was absent, the bill caption is not shown. For a complete description of the bills included in key votes, see the Almanac's Guide to Usage.

    • Pass GOP budget
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • End fiscal cliff
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • Extend payroll tax cut
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • Find AG in contempt
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Stop student loan hike
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • Repeal health care
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Raise debt limit
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Pass cut, cap, balance
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Defund Planned Parenthood
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Repeal lightbulb ban
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Add endangered listings
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Speed troop withdrawal
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
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The Almanac is a members-only database of searchable profiles compiled and adapted from the Almanac of American Politics. Comprehensive online profiles include biographical and political summaries of elected officials, campaign expenditures, voting records, interest-group ratings, and congressional staff look-ups. In-depth overviews of each state and house district are included as well, along with demographic data, analysis of voting trends, and political histories.
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