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Republican

Rep. Mo Brooks (R)

Mo Brooks Contact
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Email: n/a
DC Contact Information

Phone: 202-225-4801

Address: 1230 LHOB, DC 20515

State Office Contact Information

Phone: (256) 355-9400

Address: 302 Lee Street, Decatur AL 35601-1926

Huntsville AL

Phone: (256) 551-0190

Fax: (256) 551-0194

Address: 2101 West Clinton Avenue, Huntsville AL 35805-3109

Florence AL

Phone: (256) 718-5155

Fax: (256) 718-5156

Address: 102 South Court Street, Florence AL 35630-5633

Mo Brooks Staff
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White, Peter
Legislative Counsel
Pettitt, Mark
Chief of Staff; Legislative Director
Tharp, Andrew
Military Legislative Assistant
Tharp, Andrew
Military Legislative Assistant
Pettitt, Mark
Chief of Staff; Legislative Director
Tharp, Andrew
Military Legislative Assistant
Tharp, Andrew
Military Legislative Assistant
Pettitt, Mark
Chief of Staff; Legislative Director
Tharp, Andrew
Military Legislative Assistant
White, Peter
Legislative Counsel
Pettitt, Mark
Chief of Staff; Legislative Director
Tharp, Andrew
Military Legislative Assistant
Tharp, Andrew
Military Legislative Assistant
Tharp, Andrew
Military Legislative Assistant
Pettitt, Mark
Chief of Staff; Legislative Director
White, Peter
Legislative Counsel
Tharp, Andrew
Military Legislative Assistant
Pettitt, Mark
Chief of Staff; Legislative Director
White, Peter
Legislative Counsel
White, Peter
Legislative Counsel
Pettitt, Mark
Chief of Staff; Legislative Director
Pettitt, Mark
Chief of Staff; Legislative Director
Pettitt, Mark
Chief of Staff; Legislative Director
Tharp, Andrew
Military Legislative Assistant
Pettitt, Mark
Chief of Staff; Legislative Director
Tharp, Andrew
Military Legislative Assistant
Tharp, Andrew
Military Legislative Assistant
Tharp, Andrew
Military Legislative Assistant
Murray, Kathy
Field Representative; Grants Coordinator
Pettitt, Mark
Chief of Staff; Legislative Director
Tharp, Andrew
Military Legislative Assistant
Pettitt, Mark
Chief of Staff; Legislative Director
Tharp, Andrew
Military Legislative Assistant
White, Peter
Legislative Counsel
Tharp, Andrew
Military Legislative Assistant
Pettitt, Mark
Chief of Staff; Legislative Director
Tharp, Andrew
Military Legislative Assistant
Murray, Kathy
Field Representative; Grants Coordinator
Tharp, Andrew
Military Legislative Assistant
White, Peter
Legislative Counsel
Tharp, Andrew
Military Legislative Assistant
White, Peter
Legislative Counsel
Pettitt, Mark
Chief of Staff; Legislative Director
Tharp, Andrew
Military Legislative Assistant
Pettitt, Mark
Chief of Staff; Legislative Director
Tharp, Andrew
Military Legislative Assistant
White, Peter
Legislative Counsel
White, Peter
Legislative Counsel
Tharp, Andrew
Military Legislative Assistant
Pettitt, Mark
Chief of Staff; Legislative Director
Pettitt, Mark
Chief of Staff; Legislative Director
White, Peter
Legislative Counsel
White, Peter
Legislative Counsel
Tharp, Andrew
Military Legislative Assistant
Tharp, Andrew
Military Legislative Assistant
Tharp, Andrew
Military Legislative Assistant
White, Peter
Legislative Counsel
Pettitt, Mark
Chief of Staff; Legislative Director
Tharp, Andrew
Military Legislative Assistant
Pettitt, Mark
Chief of Staff; Legislative Director
Tharp, Andrew
Military Legislative Assistant
Pettitt, Mark
Chief of Staff; Legislative Director
White, Peter
Legislative Counsel
Pettitt, Mark
Chief of Staff; Legislative Director
White, Peter
Legislative Counsel
Tharp, Andrew
Military Legislative Assistant
Garvey, Sandy
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Jackson, Timothy
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Mills, Clayton
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Murray, Kathy
Field Representative; Grants Coordinator
Noel, Tiffany
District Director
Pettitt, Mark
Chief of Staff; Legislative Director
Smith, Laura
Field Representative
Tharp, Andrew
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Turner, Johnny
Field Representative
Vandiver, Lauren
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White, Peter
Legislative Counsel
Pettitt, Mark
Chief of Staff; Legislative Director
Vandiver, Lauren
Communications Director
Garvey, Sandy
Special Projects Coordinator
Murray, Kathy
Field Representative; Grants Coordinator
White, Peter
Legislative Counsel
Noel, Tiffany
District Director
Tharp, Andrew
Military Legislative Assistant
Jackson, Timothy
Legislative Correspondent
Mills, Clayton
Legislative Correspondent
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Chief of Staff; Legislative Director
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Field Representative
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Mo Brooks Committees
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Mo Brooks Biography
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  • Elected: 2010, 2nd term.
  • District: Alabama 5
  • Born: Apr. 29, 1954, Charleston, SC
  • Home: Huntsville
  • Education:

    Duke U., B.A. 1975; U. of AL, J.D. 1978.

  • Professional Career:

    Tuscaloosa Cnty. asst. district atty., 1978-80; Madison Cnty. district atty., 1991-93; AL special asst. atty. gen., 1995-2002; practicing atty., 1993-2010.

  • Political Career:

    AL House, 1983-90; Madison Cnty. Commissioner, 1997-2010.

  • Ethnicity: White/Caucasian
  • Religion:

    Christian

  • Family: Married (Martha); 4 children

Mo Brooks, the 5th District congressman, in 2010 became the first Republican to be elected to the seat since 1868. As a member of that year’s boisterous freshman GOP class, he occasionally has drawn Democratic barbs for his blunt speaking style. Read More

Mo Brooks, the 5th District congressman, in 2010 became the first Republican to be elected to the seat since 1868. As a member of that year’s boisterous freshman GOP class, he occasionally has drawn Democratic barbs for his blunt speaking style.

Brooks was born in Charleston, S.C. His father, Jack Brooks, was raised “dirt poor” in Chattanooga, Tenn., and his mother, Betty Brooks, grew up without electricity or indoor plumbing. “Out of that poverty, my parents learned that you’d better work, and work hard,” Brooks said. In 1963, when Mo was 9, the family moved to Huntsville, Ala., where Jack worked as an electrical engineer and Betty taught high school economics and government. Brooks was a student at Grissom High School during the Vietnam War, and he says the experience influenced his decision to make a career in government. He quit the basketball team to join the debate team and wound up participating in two state-championship debates. Brooks went on to study economics and political science at Duke University, graduating in three years. While he was a senior, he met Martha Jenkins of Ohio at a fraternity event, and a few years later, the two married.

In 1980, they moved to Brooks’ hometown of Huntsville, where he landed a circuit court clerkship. Two years later, he ran for the Alabama House, becoming one of only 11 Republicans elected that year out of 147 legislators. Brooks was reelected three times, and says he was most proud of his No. 1 ranking from the Alabama Taxpayers’ Defense Fund for his efforts to fight tax increases. He left the legislature when Republican Gov. Guy Hunt appointed him Madison County district attorney in 1991. He succeeded Democrat Bud Cramer, who had been elected to the U.S. House. Brooks lost a bid to keep the D.A.’s job two years later, hampered by Cramer’s endorsement of his Democratic opponent. He returned to public office in 1996, when he was elected to the Madison County Commission. In spite of Alabama’s history of electing conservative Democrats until relatively recently, Brooks says he has always felt more at home in the Republican Party. “It’s the difference between Jimmy Carter and policies that fail, and Ronald Reagan and policies that work,” he says.

Brooks won his U.S. House seat following hard-fought primary and general election battles in 2010. Within four months of taking the seat, he landed in the headlines when multiple deadly tornadoes struck his district. He worked to obtain disaster funds as a member of the committees on Armed Services and Homeland Security, but drew more attention for his subsequent tart-tongued remarks on other issues. In April, he charged in a floor speech that the United States is at “risk of insolvency and bankruptcy because the socialist members of this body choose to spend money that we do not have.” After Democrats protested, Brooks asked that his remarks be stricken from the record, but did not apologize for them. Several months later, at a forum back home, Brooks said he supported any measure “short of shooting them” to force illegal immigrants back to their home countries. Latino lawmakers and groups condemned his remarks.

When he circulated a letter in November 2011 urging House GOP leaders to hold a vote on a Senate-passed Chinese currency manipulation measure, the conservative anti-tax group Club for Growth assailed Brooks for “standing with Senate liberals like (Democratic Sens.) Sherrod Brown and Chuck Schumer.” Brooks was unapologetic: “Americans cannot stand idly by and watch Communist China undermine our economy via unfair trade practices,” he said.

Brooks landed in an even bigger controversy in August 2014. Asked by conservative radio host Laura Ingraham about a statement that the Republican Party was alienating non-white voters, Brooks responded: "This is a part of the war on whites that’s being launched by the Democratic Party. And the way in which they’re launching this war is by claiming that whites hate everybody else. It’s a part of the strategy that Barack Obama implemented in 2008, continued in 2012, where he divides us all on race, on sex, greed, envy, class warfare, all those kinds of things."

Ingraham responded that the characterization was "a little out there," and numerous Democrats blasted Brooks for what they called wrongly playing the race card. Democratic Alabama Rep. Terri Sewell, who is African-American, said his comments were "insensitive" and "do not represent the views of the state of Alabama." But Brooks was unapologetic. "Look at what the Democrats do on a regular basis," he said a few days later. "They appeal to specific racial groups by saying we will protect you, that particular racial group -- well, who are they talking about protecting them from? Well, they're talking about protecting them from Republicans."

Brooks claimed the House seat by defeating one-term Democratic incumbent Parker Griffith. With Southern Democrats losing their seats by the bucketful in recent elections, Griffith tried to hang onto his by announcing in December 2009 that he was switching parties and that he would seek reelection in 2010 as a Republican. During the GOP primary campaign, Brooks campaigned on the theme that the district “deserves a congressman who acts honorably.” He won with 51% of the vote to Griffith’s 33% and was able to avoid a runoff.

In the general election, Brooks' opponent was Steve Raby, the longtime chief of staff to former Sen. Howell Heflin of Alabama. The Democrat shunned his party label in most of his ads, focusing almost exclusively on local issues. Brooks, for his part, took on hot-button issues, declaring that he favored repealing President Barack Obama’s health care legislation and deporting all illegal immigrants. He says that the country is veering dangerously toward socialism and that the trend must be reversed.

Brooks won with 58% of the vote to Raby’s 42%. In seeking reelection two years later, he dispatched Griffith again in the Republican primary with 71% of the vote, winning each of the district’s five counties. He had an even easier time in the general election against Democrat Charlie Holley, outraising him by 16-to-1 and taking 65%.

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Mo Brooks Election Results
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2012 General
Mo Brooks (R)
Votes: 189,185
Percent: 65.02%
Charlie Holley (D)
Votes: 101,772
Percent: 34.98%
2012 Primary
Mo Brooks (R)
Votes: 65,123
Percent: 70.94%
Parker Griffith (R)
Votes: 26,680
Percent: 29.06%
Prior Winning Percentages
2010 (58%)
Mo Brooks Votes and Bills
Back to top NJ Vote Ratings

National Journal’s rating system is an objective method of analyzing voting. The liberal score means that the lawmaker’s votes were more liberal than that percentage of his colleagues’ votes. The conservative score means his votes were more conservative than that percentage of his colleagues’ votes. The composite score is an average of a lawmaker’s six issue-based scores. See all NJ Voting

More Liberal
More Conservative
2013 2012 2011
Economic 34 (L) : 65 (C) 7 (L) : 91 (C) 47 (L) : 51 (C)
Social - (L) : 87 (C) - (L) : 91 (C) 17 (L) : 74 (C)
Foreign 15 (L) : 77 (C) 43 (L) : 54 (C) 16 (L) : 75 (C)
Composite 20.0 (L) : 80.0 (C) 19.0 (L) : 81.0 (C) 30.0 (L) : 70.0 (C)
Interest Group Ratings

The vote ratings by 10 special interest groups provide insight into a lawmaker’s general ideology and the degree to which he or she agrees with the group’s point of view. Two organizations provide just one combined rating for 2011 and 2012, the two sessions of the 112th Congress. They are the ACLU and the ITIC. About the interest groups.

20112012
FRC90100
LCV1411
CFG8686
ITIC-58
NTU7983
20112012
COC88-
ACLU-0
ACU8892
ADA510
AFSCME0-
Key House Votes

The key votes show how a member of Congress voted on the major bills of the year. N indicates a "no" vote; Y a "yes" vote. If a member voted "present" or was absent, the bill caption is not shown. For a complete description of the bills included in key votes, see the Almanac's Guide to Usage.

    • Pass GOP budget
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • End fiscal cliff
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • Extend payroll tax cut
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • Find AG in contempt
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Stop student loan hike
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Repeal health care
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Raise debt limit
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Pass cut, cap, balance
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Defund Planned Parenthood
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Repeal lightbulb ban
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Add endangered listings
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Speed troop withdrawal
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
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The Almanac is a members-only database of searchable profiles compiled and adapted from the Almanac of American Politics. Comprehensive online profiles include biographical and political summaries of elected officials, campaign expenditures, voting records, interest-group ratings, and congressional staff look-ups. In-depth overviews of each state and house district are included as well, along with demographic data, analysis of voting trends, and political histories.
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