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Republican

Rep. Trey Gowdy (R)

Trey Gowdy Contact
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Email: n/a
DC Contact Information

Phone: 202-225-6030

Address: 1404 LHOB, DC 20515

Websites: gowdy.house.gov
State Office Contact Information

Phone: (864) 241-0175

Address: 104 South Main Street, Greenville SC 29601-2742

Spartanburg SC

Phone: (864) 583-3264

Address: 101 West St. John Street, Spartanburg SC 29306-5167

Trey Gowdy Staff
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Sort by INTEREST NAME TITLE
Bartlett, Anna
Legislative Director; Deputy Chief of Staff
Bartlett, Anna
Legislative Director; Deputy Chief of Staff
Bartlett, Anna
Legislative Director; Deputy Chief of Staff
Spencer, Nicholas
Press Assistant; Legislative Assistant
Bartlett, Anna
Legislative Director; Deputy Chief of Staff
Bartlett, Anna
Legislative Director; Deputy Chief of Staff
Bartlett, Anna
Legislative Director; Deputy Chief of Staff
Manion, Patrick
Legislative Assistant
Bartlett, Anna
Legislative Director; Deputy Chief of Staff
Spencer, Nicholas
Press Assistant; Legislative Assistant
Manion, Patrick
Legislative Assistant
Manion, Patrick
Legislative Assistant
Manion, Patrick
Legislative Assistant
Bartlett, Anna
Legislative Director; Deputy Chief of Staff
Spencer, Nicholas
Press Assistant; Legislative Assistant
Spencer, Nicholas
Press Assistant; Legislative Assistant
Manion, Patrick
Legislative Assistant
Manion, Patrick
Legislative Assistant
Spencer, Nicholas
Press Assistant; Legislative Assistant
Bartlett, Anna
Legislative Director; Deputy Chief of Staff
Spencer, Nicholas
Press Assistant; Legislative Assistant
Bartlett, Anna
Legislative Director; Deputy Chief of Staff
Spencer, Nicholas
Press Assistant; Legislative Assistant
Spencer, Nicholas
Press Assistant; Legislative Assistant
Spencer, Nicholas
Press Assistant; Legislative Assistant
Manion, Patrick
Legislative Assistant
Spencer, Nicholas
Press Assistant; Legislative Assistant
Manion, Patrick
Legislative Assistant
Bartlett, Anna
Legislative Director; Deputy Chief of Staff
Spencer, Nicholas
Press Assistant; Legislative Assistant
Spencer, Nicholas
Press Assistant; Legislative Assistant
Manion, Patrick
Legislative Assistant
Spencer, Nicholas
Press Assistant; Legislative Assistant
Manion, Patrick
Legislative Assistant
Bartlett, Anna
Legislative Director; Deputy Chief of Staff
Manion, Patrick
Legislative Assistant
Manion, Patrick
Legislative Assistant
Manion, Patrick
Legislative Assistant
Bartlett, Anna
Legislative Director; Deputy Chief of Staff
Manion, Patrick
Legislative Assistant
Spencer, Nicholas
Press Assistant; Legislative Assistant
Spencer, Nicholas
Press Assistant; Legislative Assistant
Bartlett, Anna
Legislative Director; Deputy Chief of Staff
Crick, Cindy
Chief of Staff
Dix, Josh
Field Representative
Duvall, Amanda
Communications Director
House, Missy
Field Representative
Hurst, Hallie
Field Representative
Manion, Patrick
Legislative Assistant
Moore, Jalitha
Field Representative
Spencer, Nicholas
Press Assistant; Legislative Assistant
Turner, Katherine
Grants Coordinator
Crick, Cindy
Chief of Staff
Duvall, Amanda
Communications Director
Turner, Katherine
Grants Coordinator
Bartlett, Anna
Legislative Director; Deputy Chief of Staff
Manion, Patrick
Legislative Assistant
Spencer, Nicholas
Press Assistant; Legislative Assistant
Bartlett, Anna
Legislative Director; Deputy Chief of Staff
Spencer, Nicholas
Press Assistant; Legislative Assistant
Dix, Josh
Field Representative
House, Missy
Field Representative
Hurst, Hallie
Field Representative
Moore, Jalitha
Field Representative
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Trey Gowdy Committees
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Trey Gowdy Biography
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  • Elected: 2010, 2nd term.
  • District: South Carolina 4
  • Born: Aug. 22, 1964, Greenville
  • Home: Spartanburg
  • Education:

    Baylor U., B.A. 1986; U. of SC, J.D. 1989.

  • Professional Career:

    Prosecutor, U.S. Atty. Office, SC, 1994-2000.

  • Political Career:

    Solicitor, SC 7th Circuit, 2000-10.

  • Ethnicity: White/Caucasian
  • Religion:

    Baptist

  • Family: Married (Terri Dillard Gowdy); 2 children

Republican Trey Gowdy, elected in 2010, likes to call himself “a prosecutor, not a politician,” and he has doggedly taken part in his party’s investigations of the Obama administration—but he has a politician’s gregarious personality. He was named in May 2014 to head a select committee investigating the Obama administration's handling of the 2012 terrorist attacks in Benghazi, Libya, an issue that has been a cause celebre for conservatives. Read More

Republican Trey Gowdy, elected in 2010, likes to call himself “a prosecutor, not a politician,” and he has doggedly taken part in his party’s investigations of the Obama administration—but he has a politician’s gregarious personality. He was named in May 2014 to head a select committee investigating the Obama administration's handling of the 2012 terrorist attacks in Benghazi, Libya, an issue that has been a cause celebre for conservatives.

Gowdy grew up in Spartanburg, where he still lives with his wife, Terri, and their two children. His father grew up poor but worked to become the first in his family to finish college and eventually to put himself through medical school and became a pediatrician. The family was well-off financially, but Trey Gowdy was encouraged to get jobs mowing lawns and bagging groceries. He got his first car from his father, who made him pay for it with his earnings. His academic performance in his younger years was “extraordinarily average,” Gowdy recalled in an interview with National Journal. But as a teenager, he was inspired by Ronald Reagan’s 1980 campaign for president and by a stint as a Senate page, sponsored by then-Sen. Strom Thurmond, R-S.C. Gowdy buckled down and earned a law degree from the University of South Carolina.

In 1994, Gowdy became a prosecutor for the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Greenville, where he worked on cases ranging from drug trafficking to murder. In 2000, he successfully ran for the county solicitor’s post and was reelected twice. In that role, he sought the death penalty in seven cases and won them all. Much of the job was managerial, but Gowdy says he tried about half of the cases that came through his office himself, focusing his efforts on preventing violence against women and drunken driving. Gowdy, who named his dogs Judge, Jury, and Bailiff, says that being a prosecutor was “the best job I will ever have in my life.”

He said he decided to challenge six-term GOP Rep. Bob Inglis in the 2010 Republican primary after the incumbent had tacked to the left on a number of issues. Gowdy portrayed his opponent as a Washington insider whose pragmatic positions on some issues were out of step with the district’s conservative voters. He criticized Inglis for earmarking funds in appropriations bills, for his opposition to President George W. Bush’s 2007 troop surge in Iraq, and for his stand against oil exploration in Alaska’s Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. Inglis declared that he was running against the “sins of Congress,” rather than an individual.

Gowdy finished ahead of Inglis in the initial balloting, and then soundly defeated him in a runoff, 71% to 29%. Inglis’ defeat in the early summer primary was one of the first concrete signs that the restless mood of voters in 2010 would spell trouble for incumbents that fall. In the general election, Gowdy breezed past Democrat Paul Corden, a retired businessman and Vietnam veteran, 63% to 29%. He did just as well two years later, winning reelection 65% to 34%.

In the House, Gowdy is a committed conservative; he was the chamber's 25th most conservative member in 2013, according to National Journal rankings. He always willing to offer opinions to reporters and lavishly compliment his colleagues, and despairs of today’s lack of civility in Congress. “We, Republicans and Democrats, are as kind and polite to each other as you could possibly be,” he told a local audience in 2012. “That changes the moment the cameras come on.” He took over the Oversight and Government Reform Committee’s panel on the District of Columbia and surprised city officials by not taking as heavy-handed an approach to monitoring the city as his GOP predecessors.

At the same time, Gowdy can be as ferocious as any of his Class of 2010 colleagues in taking on the Obama administration. He called for Attorney General Eric Holder to resign or be impeached for his failure to rein in the “Operation Fast and Furious” gun-tracking program. He dismissed Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi’s assertion that the panel’s Fast and Furious investigation was linked to voter suppression as “mind-numbingly stupid.” At a 2011 hearing on Nuclear Regulatory Commission Chairman Gregory Jaczko’s alleged mistreatment of colleagues, he upbraided Jaczko: “When you have four eyewitnesses that testify to someone under oath, you know what they call a defendant after that? An inmate.”

Gowdy was named the House’s “surprise standout” in Washingtonian magazine’s 2012 survey of congressional aides and won a plum assignment in 2013 as chairman of the Judiciary Committee panel on immigration. He told GreenvilleOnline.com that he wanted to develop an immigration reform bill that reflects “the humanity that I think defines us as a people and the respect for the rule of law that defines us as a republic.” But even though the Senate passed a bipartisan bill in 2013, House Republicans could not agree among themselves about what should be included in the measure, and the effort eventually fell apart.

Gowdy turned his attention to other issues. He was one of the most outspoken critics of the Affordable Care Act, blasting the president for changing language on whether people would be able to keep their insurance under thew law. “The president already has a Nobel Prize for peace; I think he’s shooting for one in fiction,” he told Fox News in November 2013. He later sponsored a bill that would authorize Congress to sue the president for failing to "faithfully execute" federal laws, including those with which the chief executive disagrees. It passed the House on a largely party-line vote in March 2014 but languished in the Democratic-controlled Senate. "To me, it’s not a political issue," Gowdy said. "Do you think the chief executive should have to actually enforce the law? I would think every member of the House and Senate would support that.”

But it was the Benghazi investigation that thrust Gowdy into the spotlight. After the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee spent months pursuing allegations that the administration bungled the response to the attack and lied to Congress about it, House Republican leaders decided to create a select committee headed by Gowdy. "Trey Gowdy is as dogged, focused, and serious-minded as they come,” House Speaker John Boehner said in a statement announcing the decision. Gowdy later cautioned Republicans against seeking to raise money off “the backs of four murdered Americans,” but the issue proved too enticing to party officials seeking to galvanize the base. After House Democrats initially denounced the select committee as a partisan stunt, they agreed to participate, and the panel began holding closed-door hearings in summer 2014.

Gowdy was approached about potentially challenging South Carolina Republican Sen. Lindsey Graham in a 2014 primary, but demurred. He told conservative talk radio host Laura Ingraham, “I do not want to stay in Washington. I am where I want to be right now, which is South Carolina, dreading driving to the airport [to fly to D.C.] tomorrow."

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Trey Gowdy Election Results
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2012 General
Trey Gowdy (R)
Votes: 173,201
Percent: 64.98%
Deb Morrow (D)
Votes: 89,964
Percent: 33.75%
2012 Primary
Trey Gowdy (R)
Unopposed
Prior Winning Percentages
2010 (63%)
Trey Gowdy Votes and Bills
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National Journal’s rating system is an objective method of analyzing voting. The liberal score means that the lawmaker’s votes were more liberal than that percentage of his colleagues’ votes. The conservative score means his votes were more conservative than that percentage of his colleagues’ votes. The composite score is an average of a lawmaker’s six issue-based scores. See all NJ Voting

More Liberal
More Conservative
2013 2012 2011
Economic - (L) : 98 (C) 7 (L) : 91 (C) 30 (L) : 66 (C)
Social 31 (L) : 67 (C) 25 (L) : 74 (C) - (L) : 83 (C)
Foreign - (L) : 95 (C) 9 (L) : 86 (C) 16 (L) : 75 (C)
Composite 11.8 (L) : 88.2 (C) 15.0 (L) : 85.0 (C) 20.3 (L) : 79.7 (C)
Interest Group Ratings

The vote ratings by 10 special interest groups provide insight into a lawmaker’s general ideology and the degree to which he or she agrees with the group’s point of view. Two organizations provide just one combined rating for 2011 and 2012, the two sessions of the 112th Congress. They are the ACLU and the ITIC. About the interest groups.

20112012
FRC9066
LCV66
CFG9791
ITIC-67
NTU8785
20112012
COC88-
ACLU-0
ACU96100
ADA510
AFSCME0-
Key House Votes

The key votes show how a member of Congress voted on the major bills of the year. N indicates a "no" vote; Y a "yes" vote. If a member voted "present" or was absent, the bill caption is not shown. For a complete description of the bills included in key votes, see the Almanac's Guide to Usage.

    • Pass GOP budget
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • End fiscal cliff
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • Extend payroll tax cut
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • Find AG in contempt
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Stop student loan hike
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • Repeal health care
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Raise debt limit
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Pass cut, cap, balance
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Defund Planned Parenthood
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Repeal lightbulb ban
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Add endangered listings
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Speed troop withdrawal
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
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The Almanac is a members-only database of searchable profiles compiled and adapted from the Almanac of American Politics. Comprehensive online profiles include biographical and political summaries of elected officials, campaign expenditures, voting records, interest-group ratings, and congressional staff look-ups. In-depth overviews of each state and house district are included as well, along with demographic data, analysis of voting trends, and political histories.
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