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Democrat

Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D)

Dianne Feinstein Contact
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Email: n/a
DC Contact Information

Phone: 202-224-3841

Address: 331 HSOB, DC 20510

State Office Contact Information

Phone: (415) 393-0707

Address: One Post Street, San Francisco CA 94104-5240

Fresno CA

Phone: (559) 485-7430

Fax: (559) 485-9689

Address: 2500 Tulare Street, Fresno CA 93721

Los Angeles CA

Phone: (310) 914-7300

Fax: (310) 914-7318

Address: 11111 Santa Monica Boulevard, Los Angeles CA 90025-3343

San Diego CA

Phone: (619) 231-9712

Fax: (619) 231-1108

Address: 880 Front Street, San Diego CA 92101

Dianne Feinstein Staff
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Zuckerman, Naomi
Legislative Correspondent
Chen, Daniel
Director of Constituent Services
Paulino, Tom
Constituent Services Representative
Schifrin, Samantha
Legislative Correspondent
Moore, Kellen
Legislative Correspondent
Chen, Daniel
Director of Constituent Services
Esquivel, Joshua
Legislative Assistant
Coles, Fabrice
Legislative Assistant
Chen, Daniel
Director of Constituent Services
Coles, Fabrice
Legislative Assistant
Esquivel, Joshua
Legislative Assistant
Zuckerman, Naomi
Legislative Correspondent
Coles, Fabrice
Legislative Assistant
Esquivel, Joshua
Legislative Assistant
Macaspac, Angeline
Assistant to the Chief of Staff
Thompson, Megan
Legislative Assistant
Fox, Elisabeth
Assistant to the Legislative Director
Coles, Fabrice
Legislative Assistant
Fox, Elisabeth
Assistant to the Legislative Director
Hosea, Andrew
Legislative Correspondent
Chen, Daniel
Director of Constituent Services
Coles, Fabrice
Legislative Assistant
Zuckerman, Naomi
Legislative Correspondent
Coles, Fabrice
Legislative Assistant
Zuckerman, Naomi
Legislative Correspondent
Macaspac, Angeline
Assistant to the Chief of Staff
Paulino, Tom
Constituent Services Representative
Esquivel, Joshua
Legislative Assistant
Macaspac, Angeline
Assistant to the Chief of Staff
Higgins, Trevor
Legislative Assistant
Watts, John
Legislative Director
Higgins, Trevor
Legislative Assistant
Moore, Kellen
Legislative Correspondent
Paulino, Tom
Constituent Services Representative
Peterson, James
Legislative Assistant
Watts, John
Legislative Director
Yeung, Felix
Legislative Assistant
Esquivel, Joshua
Legislative Assistant
Yeung, Felix
Legislative Assistant
Thompson, Megan
Legislative Assistant
Coles, Fabrice
Legislative Assistant
Paulino, Tom
Constituent Services Representative
Schifrin, Samantha
Legislative Correspondent
Coles, Fabrice
Legislative Assistant
Esquivel, Joshua
Legislative Assistant
Macaspac, Angeline
Assistant to the Chief of Staff
Moore, Kellen
Legislative Correspondent
Paulino, Tom
Constituent Services Representative
Coles, Fabrice
Legislative Assistant
Esquivel, Joshua
Legislative Assistant
Macaspac, Angeline
Assistant to the Chief of Staff
Moore, Kellen
Legislative Correspondent
Paulino, Tom
Constituent Services Representative
Thompson, Megan
Legislative Assistant
Zuckerman, Naomi
Legislative Correspondent
Fox, Elisabeth
Assistant to the Legislative Director
Higgins, Trevor
Legislative Assistant
Yeung, Felix
Legislative Assistant
Coles, Fabrice
Legislative Assistant
Fox, Elisabeth
Assistant to the Legislative Director
Fox, Elisabeth
Assistant to the Legislative Director
Hosea, Andrew
Legislative Correspondent
Coles, Fabrice
Legislative Assistant
Fox, Elisabeth
Assistant to the Legislative Director
Peterson, James
Legislative Assistant
Schifrin, Samantha
Legislative Correspondent
Yeung, Felix
Legislative Assistant
Thompson, Megan
Legislative Assistant
Zuckerman, Naomi
Legislative Correspondent
Thompson, Megan
Legislative Assistant
Zuckerman, Naomi
Legislative Correspondent
Thompson, Megan
Legislative Assistant
Zuckerman, Naomi
Legislative Correspondent
Chen, Daniel
Director of Constituent Services
Yeung, Felix
Legislative Assistant
Yeung, Felix
Legislative Assistant
Higgins, Trevor
Legislative Assistant
Moore, Kellen
Legislative Correspondent
Paulino, Tom
Constituent Services Representative
Peterson, James
Legislative Assistant
Watts, John
Legislative Director
Yeung, Felix
Legislative Assistant
Peterson, James
Legislative Assistant
Schifrin, Samantha
Legislative Correspondent
Yeung, Felix
Legislative Assistant
Coles, Fabrice
Legislative Assistant
Fox, Elisabeth
Assistant to the Legislative Director
Higgins, Trevor
Legislative Assistant
Yeung, Felix
Legislative Assistant
Coles, Fabrice
Legislative Assistant
Esquivel, Joshua
Legislative Assistant
Macaspac, Angeline
Assistant to the Chief of Staff
Paulino, Tom
Constituent Services Representative
Paulino, Tom
Constituent Services Representative
Moore, Kellen
Legislative Correspondent
Coles, Fabrice
Legislative Assistant
Coles, Fabrice
Legislative Assistant
Higgins, Trevor
Legislative Assistant
Higgins, Trevor
Legislative Assistant
Watts, John
Legislative Director
Chen, Daniel
Director of Constituent Services
Peterson, James
Legislative Assistant
Schifrin, Samantha
Legislative Correspondent
Yeung, Felix
Legislative Assistant
Moore, Kellen
Legislative Correspondent
Thompson, Megan
Legislative Assistant
Zuckerman, Naomi
Legislative Correspondent
Aguilera, Cecilia
Legislative Correspondent
Chen, Daniel
Director of Constituent Services
Coles, Fabrice
Legislative Assistant
Crowder, Erin
Administrative Director
Duck, Jennifer
Chief of Staff
Elsbernd, Sean
Deputy State Director
Esquivel, Joshua
Legislative Assistant
Fox, Elisabeth
Assistant to the Legislative Director
Frazier, Sam
Mailroom Director
Galli, Morgan
Assistant to the State Director
Gilbert, Jonathan
Legislative Correspondent
Gross, Katie
Assistant Field Representative
Halek, Matt
Staff Assistant
Hart, Iain
Staff Assistant
Higgins, Trevor
Legislative Assistant
Hosea, Andrew
Legislative Correspondent
Kratz, William
Field Representative
Leraris, Steve
Systems Administrator
Loy, Stevy
Legislative Aide
Macaspac, Angeline
Assistant to the Chief of Staff
Mentzer, Tom
Communications Director
Moffat, Sarah
Field Representative
Moore, Kellen
Legislative Correspondent
Murray, John
Field Representative
Niyonsaba, Julius
Legislative Correspondent
O'Brien, Molly
Field Representative
Paulino, Tom
Constituent Services Representative
Peterson, James
Legislative Assistant
Pinkney, Percy
Senior State Field Representative
Schifrin, Samantha
Legislative Correspondent
Shihadeh, Iyad
Constituent Services Representative
Thomas, Ann
Staff Assistant
Thompson, Megan
Legislative Assistant
Watts, John
Legislative Director
Yager, Austin
Personal Assistant
Yeung, Felix
Legislative Assistant
Zuckerman, Naomi
Legislative Correspondent
Leraris, Steve
Systems Administrator
Loy, Stevy
Legislative Aide
Fox, Elisabeth
Assistant to the Legislative Director
Galli, Morgan
Assistant to the State Director
Macaspac, Angeline
Assistant to the Chief of Staff
Yager, Austin
Personal Assistant
Duck, Jennifer
Chief of Staff
Mentzer, Tom
Communications Director
Chen, Daniel
Director of Constituent Services
Crowder, Erin
Administrative Director
Elsbernd, Sean
Deputy State Director
Frazier, Sam
Mailroom Director
Coles, Fabrice
Legislative Assistant
Esquivel, Joshua
Legislative Assistant
Higgins, Trevor
Legislative Assistant
Peterson, James
Legislative Assistant
Thompson, Megan
Legislative Assistant
Yeung, Felix
Legislative Assistant
Aguilera, Cecilia
Legislative Correspondent
Gilbert, Jonathan
Legislative Correspondent
Hosea, Andrew
Legislative Correspondent
Moore, Kellen
Legislative Correspondent
Niyonsaba, Julius
Legislative Correspondent
Schifrin, Samantha
Legislative Correspondent
Zuckerman, Naomi
Legislative Correspondent
Watts, John
Legislative Director
Gross, Katie
Assistant Field Representative
Kratz, William
Field Representative
Moffat, Sarah
Field Representative
Murray, John
Field Representative
O'Brien, Molly
Field Representative
Paulino, Tom
Constituent Services Representative
Pinkney, Percy
Senior State Field Representative
Shihadeh, Iyad
Constituent Services Representative
Halek, Matt
Staff Assistant
Hart, Iain
Staff Assistant
Thomas, Ann
Staff Assistant
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Dianne Feinstein Committees
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Intelligence (Select) (Vice chairman)
Dianne Feinstein Biography
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  • Elected: Nov. 1992, term expires 2018, 4th full term.
  • State: California
  • Born: Jun. 22, 1933, San Francisco
  • Home: San Francisco
  • Education:

    Stanford U., B.A. 1955

  • Professional Career:

    CA Women's Parole Bd., 1960–66.

  • Political Career:

    San Francisco Bd. of Supervisors, 1970–78, Pres., 1970–71, 1974–75, 1978; San Francisco mayor, 1978–88.

  • Ethnicity: White/Caucasian
  • Religion:

    Jewish

  • Family: Married (Richard C. Blum); 4 children

Dianne Feinstein, California’s senior senator, is a Democrat first elected in 1992. She is a respected pragmatist who can be a crucial ally to President Obama -- particularly on gun control -- as well as an annoyance to the White House with her blunt outspokenness on national-security matters. Read More

Dianne Feinstein, California’s senior senator, is a Democrat first elected in 1992. She is a respected pragmatist who can be a crucial ally to President Obama -- particularly on gun control -- as well as an annoyance to the White House with her blunt outspokenness on national-security matters.

Feinstein grew up in San Francisco in lush Presidio Heights, the daughter of a doctor who hoped she would follow him into the profession. In her first semester at Stanford University, Feinstein got a D in genetics and decided she did not have the aptitude for medicine. But she did love a class she took on American political thought. She graduated with a degree in criminology and then, while doing an internship, wrote a paper about post-conviction phases of the justice system that she thought contained valuable ideas for the state of California. Feinstein sent her paper to Gov. Pat Brown. Despite her youth—she was just 27—the governor appointed her to the California Women’s Board of Terms and Parole. In 1969, she won her first election, to the San Francisco County Board of Supervisors. Feinstein went on to become president of the board and, in 1978, was suddenly catapulted to mayor when Mayor George Moscone and Supervisor Harvey Milk were shot to death by former Supervisor Dan White. Feinstein discovered Moscone’s body and, in the subsequent weeks, displayed a steadiness and a sense of command that calmed the city. She was elected to full terms in 1979 and 1983. Much later, when the film Milk was released to critical acclaim in 2008, Feinstein told The New York Times that she wasn’t sure she’d ever be able to watch it. “It’s very painful for me,” she said.

In 1984, Democratic presidential candidate Walter Mondale seriously considered Feinstein for vice president but passed over her for Geraldine Ferraro because of qualms about the business dealings of Feinstein’s husband, Richard Blum. She presided gracefully that year over the Democratic National Convention in San Francisco, while ironically, Ferraro juggled questions about her family’s business dealings.

Ineligible for a third term, Feinstein left the mayor’s office in 1987 and ran for governor in 1990. She won the Democratic primary impressively, then lost 49%-46% to Republican Pete Wilson. When Wilson appointed Orange County state Sen. John Seymour—an unknown and bland choice—to replace him in the Senate, Feinstein quickly announced for the seat. She had primary competition from Gray Davis, then state controller, who ran an ad against her campaign-finance practices and compared her to haughty New York billionaire Leona Helmsley, who went to jail for tax evasion. Feinstein won 58%-33%, and after that, her relations with Davis, elected governor in 1998 and 2002, were never warm. Davis was forced out of office in a 2003 recall election. In the 1992 general election, nothing worked for the hapless Seymour, the appointed GOP incumbent—not his switch from opposing abortion rights to favoring them, not his attempt to play on fears of illegal immigration, and not his attacks on Feinstein’s arguably tricky financing of her 1990 gubernatorial campaign, which resulted in a $190,000 fine. Feinstein won 54%-38%, coming close even in Seymour’s Southern California base.

In the Senate, Feinstein kept a distance from the Clinton administration, negotiating for changes before voting for its 1993 budget, voting against the North American Free Trade Agreement, and withdrawing her support of the Clinton health care plan. Feinstein’s tough-on-crime background led her to sponsor a ban on assault weapons in 1994. When Idaho Republican Larry Craig argued that her definition of assault weapons was not rigorous enough and challenged her knowledge of firearms, she stopped the argument in its tracks by reminding the Senate of the horrific tragedy earlier in her political career. “I know something about what firearms can do,” Feinstein said. “I came to be mayor of San Francisco as a product of assassination.” In 2000, she sponsored an unsuccessful bill to require licensing of all guns and in 2004 pressed fervently for reauthorization of the 1994 assault-weapons ban. The act expired in September 2004. As the Democratic Party’s support for gun control waned, Feinstein had a harder time convincing her colleagues to consider new gun restrictions. After a gunman at a Colorado movie theatre killed 12 people and injured 58 others in July 2012, Feinstein lamented that “there is no outrage out there” to spur a crackdown on guns.

But the public mood changed just a few months later, with the December 2012 mass shooting of 26 small children and teachers at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn. Feinstein immediately became the point person in the Democratic-controlled Senate for legislation even tougher than the 1994 law; it would ban assault weapons and high-capacity magazines. But Democrat leaders subsequently abandoned pushing for the new ban to focus on measures they hoped could draw more bipartisan support, such as expanding the criminal background check system and cracking down on so-called "straw purchasers" buying guns for criminals. But those proposals also ran into  fierce opposition, and Feinstein blamed the National Rifle Association for making colleagues afraid to vote on the assault weapons ban. “A fear has set in that if they vote for the bill they won’t be re-elected. It’s that plain, it’s that simple,” she told a San Francisco audience in April 2013.

Feinstein has had a moderate to liberal voting record and has differed on some issues from her colleague and Bay Area neighbor, Democratic Sen. Barbara Boxer. She supported the Bush tax cuts in 2001 and the Iraq war resolution in 2002, although two years later she said she had been misled into voting for the war by an exaggeration of the threat and regretted her vote. Feinstein supported the GOP’s Medicare prescription drug bill in 2003 as well. With Republican Sen. Jon Kyl of Arizona, she co-sponsored a bill to bar entry to the United States for people from nations that sponsor terrorism, which became law in 2002.

On the Judiciary Committee, Feinstein took an active role in the immigration debate in recent years. She favors a guest worker program for agricultural workers and would allow illegal aliens with U.S. work history to obtain “blue cards” to allow them to work for two years. In the debate on immigration in 2006, she and Boxer proposed a 20-year sentence for people caught building or financing underground cross-border tunnels, which became part of the border fence bill that passed both houses. On other issues, Feinstein disagreed with other Democrats who claimed the USA PATRIOT Act, the Bush administration’s centerpiece anti-terrorism law, had led to violations of civil liberties, a statement cited by President Bush in pressing for renewal of the act. She also was the only Democrat on the committee to vote in 2006 for the amendment authorizing prosecutions for flag desecration.

In 2005, Feinstein was less bipartisan in the war over some of President Bush’s judicial nominees, but she also was frequently willing to compromise in the end. With other Judiciary Democrats, she opposed several nominees to the federal appeals court. But then, with Boxer, she made an arrangement with the Bush administration to set up six-member panels to decide on the potential merits of federal trial judges in California. Three members were appointed by each side, and four votes were required to approve a nominee. In May 2005, Feinstein voted against the nomination of conservative nominee Priscilla Owen, but declined to take the harsher step of a filibuster. After an interview with Supreme Court nominee John Roberts in July 2005, she called him “very impressive” but opposed his confirmation nonetheless, out of concern that he might overturn the Roe v. Wade decision legalizing abortion. After Harriet Miers’ nomination for the high court was withdrawn in October 2005, Feinstein said, “I don’t believe they would have attacked a man the way she was attacked.”

In recent years, Feinstein has become an outspoken proponent of gay rights. In February 2011, she introduced a bill to repeal the 1996 Defense of Marriage Act, which established that U.S. law recognizes only heterosexual marriages and prevented gay couples from receiving federal benefits. The Obama White House endorsed Feinstein’s repeal effort.

In January 2009, Feinstein became chairman of the Senate Intelligence Committee and indicated she wanted to clean house at the intelligence agencies. “My view is that it’s time for a new start,” she said. “I want to see the Senate Intelligence Committee with much closer oversight and a much closer relationship with the intelligence community.” When former Clinton White House Chief of Staff Leon Panetta was announced as Obama’s choice for director of the Central Intelligence Agency, she said that she thought the president should have appointed “an intelligence professional.” But after Vice President Joseph Biden said it was a mistake not to have informed her in advance of the appointment, she was conciliatory, saying, “I’m very respectful of the president’s authority, and if this is the man he wants, then that means a lot to me.”

When former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden leaked details of the NSA's domestic surveillance efforts in 2013, Feinstein was the Obama administration's most prominent Democratic defender. She accused Snowden of "treason" and took the agency to task for not being able to prevent him from accessing so much highly classified material. The situation caused her approval ratings among Californians to plummet, falling below Boxer's in January 2014 for the first time in 20 years. She shrugged it off. "Numbers go down, numbers go up," she told the Los Angeles Times, adding: "I don't think people understand" the NSA's work.

Feinstein doesn’t hesitate to go her own way on the committee. In 2007, she supported immunity for telecommunications companies that had allowed the government to listen in on telephone calls from suspected terrorists abroad to persons in the United States, though many Democrats opposed immunity. Feinstein attached amendments to the 2007 and 2008 intelligence authorization bills to require that all government interrogations be conducted under the rules of the Army Field Manual, and she attempted to apply that standard to government contractors as well. In January 2009, she called for closing the detention camp at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, which she called a “failed experiment.” She later became engaged in protracted negotiations with the Obama administration over the public release of a report detailing the CIA's use of harsh interrogation techniques; she and other Democrats said the administration redacted far too much information. She also said the White House wasn't always prompt in notifying her about its decisions.

No issue, however, drew as much attention as Feinstein's accusation in March 2014 that the CIA had secretly removing classified documents from her Intelligence Committee staff's computers in the middle of an oversight investigation. "I have asked for an apology and a recognition that this CIA search of computers used by its oversight committee was inappropriate. I have received neither," she said. After the agency conducted an investigation and apologized four months later, she said the probe and apology were "positive first steps," but stopped short of joining several of her colleagues in calling for CIA Director John Brennan to resign.

Feinstein also repeatedly has prodded Obama to abandon his inherent cautiousness and pay more attention to global threats. In July 2014, she questioned whether he was spending too much time fundraising as conflicts raged between Israelis and Palestinians, between Russia and the Ukraine and in Iraq with the Islamic State terrorist group. “I’m not going to tell the president what to do, but I think the world would very much respect his increased attention on this matter, and I think there ought to be increased attention,” she told MSNBC. A month later, when Obama said he lacked a strategy to deal with the Islamic State, she told NBC: “I think I've learned one thing about this president, and that is he's very cautious. Maybe in this instance, too cautious.”

Feinstein frequently joins with Republicans in the increasingly anachronistic method of getting legislation passed through compromise. In January 2009, she and conservative Sen. John Cornyn of Texas co-sponsored a bill to create a permanent commission to guarantee the financial viability of Social Security and Medicare. In March 2009, she and Judiciary Committee Chairman Patrick Leahy of Vermont hammered out a compromise creating clearer requirements in patent infringement cases. In 2010, she won wide agreement on a national registry for convicted arsonists and bombers. On the Senate Rules Committee, Feinstein has worked on institutional reforms, co-sponsoring a requirement that earmarks added to spending bills be posted on the Internet for at least 24 hours. As Rules chairman, she also presided over Obama’s inauguration ceremonies on January 20, 2009.

With a seat on the powerful Appropriations Committee, Feinstein has sought public and private funding to protect old-growth redwoods in the Headwaters Forest and salt ponds in the San Francisco Bay area and to prohibit development, including solar plants and wind farms, on an additional 1 million acres in the Mojave Desert. She is more accommodating of trade ties with China than San Francisco neighbor Nancy Pelosi, the House minority leader. Feinstein has supported trade with China since she established a sister-city relationship in 1990 between San Francisco and Shanghai. She opposed Pelosi’s efforts to impose penalties on China because of its human rights violations. In 2005, Feinstein called on China to crack down on piracy of intellectual property and to revalue its currency, but she opposed a bipartisan bill to impose 27.5% tariffs on Chinese goods if it did not revalue.

Feinstein has had only one serious challenge since she was elected to the Senate, in the Republican year of 1994. U.S. Rep. Michael Huffington spent $30 million of his own money running against her and pulled even in the polls in September. Huffington slipped when it was revealed that he and his wife, Arianna Huffington, employed an illegal alien as a nanny. (Arianna Huffington now runs the liberal Huffington Post news website.) On the Thursday before the election, it was revealed that Feinstein, despite her earlier denials, had employed a woman whose work permit had expired. Feinstein won only narrowly, 47%–45%. She carried Los Angeles County 52%-40% and the San Francisco Bay Area 63%-30%, offsetting Huffington’s margins in Southern California and the rest of the state.

In 2000, Republican U.S. Rep. Tom Campbell, a libertarian Stanford Law professor, challenged her. Feinstein far outspent him, $10.3 million to $4.4 million, and won 56%-37%, carrying all of the major regions of the state. In her 2006 reelection contest, Republicans nominated conservative former state Sen. Richard Mountjoy, who was never a serious threat, and she won, 59%-35%.

As she prepared to run again in 2012, a state poll showed that she was vulnerable; just 41% of voters approved of her job performance, and 44% of voters said they would not vote to reelect her. Compounding problems for Feinstein was a scandal involving her former campaign treasurer, Kinde Durkee, who was arrested for allegedly stealing huge sums from her California clients, including an estimated $4.5 million from Feinstein’s campaign. But the campaign of her opponent, autism activist Elizabeth Emken, failed to get traction. Emken raised just $914,000 to Feinstein’s $9.8 million, and the incumbent won with 63% of the vote to Emken’s 37%.

Show Less
Dianne Feinstein Election Results
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2012 General (Top-Two General)
Dianne Feinstein (D)
Votes: 7,864,624
Percent: 62.52%
Elizabeth Emken (R)
Votes: 4,713,887
Percent: 37.48%
2012 Primary (Top-Two Primary)
Dianne Feinstein (D)
Votes: 2,392,822
Percent: 49.29%
Elizabeth Emken (R)
Votes: 613,613
Percent: 12.64%
Dan Hughes (R)
Votes: 323,840
Percent: 6.67%
Prior Winning Percentages
2006 (59%), 2000 (56%); 1994 (47%); 1992 special (54%)
Dianne Feinstein Votes and Bills
Back to top NJ Vote Ratings

National Journal’s rating system is an objective method of analyzing voting. The liberal score means that the lawmaker’s votes were more liberal than that percentage of his colleagues’ votes. The conservative score means his votes were more conservative than that percentage of his colleagues’ votes. The composite score is an average of a lawmaker’s six issue-based scores. See all NJ Voting

More Liberal
More Conservative
2013 2012 2011
Economic 69 (L) : 30 (C) 80 (L) : 17 (C) 81 (L) : 12 (C)
Social 73 (L) : - (C) 64 (L) : - (C) 52 (L) : - (C)
Foreign 71 (L) : - (C) 63 (L) : 32 (C) 76 (L) : 17 (C)
Composite 80.5 (L) : 19.5 (C) 76.3 (L) : 23.7 (C) 80.0 (L) : 20.0 (C)
Interest Group Ratings

The vote ratings by 10 special interest groups provide insight into a lawmaker’s general ideology and the degree to which he or she agrees with the group’s point of view. Two organizations provide just one combined rating for 2011 and 2012, the two sessions of the 112th Congress. They are the ACLU and the ITIC. About the interest groups.

20112012
FRC140
LCV100100
CFG910
ITIC-100
NTU99
20112012
COC64-
ACLU-75
ACU54
ADA9095
AFSCME100-
Key Senate Votes

The key votes show how a member of Congress voted on the major bills of the year. N indicates a "no" vote; Y a "yes" vote. If a member voted "present" or was absent, the bill caption is not shown. For a complete description of the bills included in key votes, see the Almanac's Guide to Usage.

    • End fiscal cliff
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Block faith exemptions
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Approve gas pipeline
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • Approve farm bill
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Let cyber bill proceed
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Block Gitmo transfers
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • Raise debt limit
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Pass balanced budget amendment
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Stop EPA climate regulations
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Proceed to Cordray vote
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Limit Fannie/Freddie
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Regulate financial firms
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2010
    • Pass tax cuts for some
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2010
    • Legalize immigrants' kids
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2010
    • Ratify New START
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2010
    • Confirm Elena Kagan
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2010
    • Stop EPA climate regs
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2010
    • Repeal don't ask, tell
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2010
    • Overturn Ledbetter
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Block release of TARP funds
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Pass $787 billion stimulus
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Repeal DC gun laws
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Confirm Sonia Sotomayor
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Pass health care bill
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Bar budget rules for climate bill
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Pass 2010 budget resolution
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Let judges adjust mortgages
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Allow FDA to regulate tobacco
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Protect gays from hate crimes
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Cut F-22 funds
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Label North Korea terrorist state
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Build Guantanamo replacement
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Allow federal funds for abortion
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Cap greenhouse gases
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2008
    • Bail out financial markets
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2008
    • Increase missile defense $
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2008
    • Overhaul FISA
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2008
    • Raise CAFE standards
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
    • Expand SCHIP
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
    • Make English official language
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • Path to citizenship
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
    • Fetus is unborn child
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • Prosecute hate crimes
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
    • Withdraw troops 3/08
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
    • Iran guard is terrorist group
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
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The Almanac is a members-only database of searchable profiles compiled and adapted from the Almanac of American Politics. Comprehensive online profiles include biographical and political summaries of elected officials, campaign expenditures, voting records, interest-group ratings, and congressional staff look-ups. In-depth overviews of each state and house district are included as well, along with demographic data, analysis of voting trends, and political histories.
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