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Republican

Rep. Michele Bachmann (R)

Michele Bachmann Contact
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Email: n/a
DC Contact Information

Phone: 202-225-2331

Address: 2417 RHOB, DC 20515

State Office Contact Information

Phone: (763) 323-8922

Address: 2850 Cutters Grove Avenue, Anoka MN 55303-4940

Michele Bachmann Staff
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Boland, Robert
Chief of Staff; Legislative Director
Wysocki, Kevin
Legislative Assistant
Boland, Robert
Chief of Staff; Legislative Director
Wysocki, Kevin
Legislative Assistant
Boland, Robert
Chief of Staff; Legislative Director
Boland, Robert
Chief of Staff; Legislative Director
Boland, Robert
Chief of Staff; Legislative Director
Doyle, Renee
Senior Legislative Assistant
Frye, Jason
Legislative Assistant
Doyle, Renee
Senior Legislative Assistant
Wysocki, Kevin
Legislative Assistant
Wysocki, Kevin
Legislative Assistant
Wysocki, Kevin
Legislative Assistant
Boland, Robert
Chief of Staff; Legislative Director
Wysocki, Kevin
Legislative Assistant
Wysocki, Kevin
Legislative Assistant
Frye, Jason
Legislative Assistant
Doyle, Renee
Senior Legislative Assistant
Frye, Jason
Legislative Assistant
Frye, Jason
Legislative Assistant
Wysocki, Kevin
Legislative Assistant
Boland, Robert
Chief of Staff; Legislative Director
Frye, Jason
Legislative Assistant
Kotman, Dan
Communications Director
Wysocki, Kevin
Legislative Assistant
Doyle, Renee
Senior Legislative Assistant
Wysocki, Kevin
Legislative Assistant
Doyle, Renee
Senior Legislative Assistant
Wysocki, Kevin
Legislative Assistant
Wysocki, Kevin
Legislative Assistant
Doyle, Renee
Senior Legislative Assistant
Frye, Jason
Legislative Assistant
Wysocki, Kevin
Legislative Assistant
Wysocki, Kevin
Legislative Assistant
Wysocki, Kevin
Legislative Assistant
Wysocki, Kevin
Legislative Assistant
Doyle, Renee
Senior Legislative Assistant
Frye, Jason
Legislative Assistant
Wysocki, Kevin
Legislative Assistant
Doyle, Renee
Senior Legislative Assistant
Kotman, Dan
Communications Director
Doyle, Renee
Senior Legislative Assistant
Wysocki, Kevin
Legislative Assistant
Frye, Jason
Legislative Assistant
Frye, Jason
Legislative Assistant
Wysocki, Kevin
Legislative Assistant
Frye, Jason
Legislative Assistant
Wysocki, Kevin
Legislative Assistant
Frye, Jason
Legislative Assistant
Doyle, Renee
Senior Legislative Assistant
Boland, Robert
Chief of Staff; Legislative Director
Doyle, Renee
Senior Legislative Assistant
Faust, Jessica
Deputy District Director
Frye, Jason
Legislative Assistant
Gordon, Brian
Constituent Services Officer
Haas, Amanda
Legislative Correspondent
Hall, Mikayla
Press Secretary
Harper, Barbara
Constituent Services Representative
Kotman, Dan
Communications Director
Miller, Karen
Constituent Services Officer
Pelzer, Nicole
Constituent Services Officer
Rubin, Kim
Scheduler
Steiskal, Deb
District Director
Wysocki, Kevin
Legislative Assistant
Boland, Robert
Chief of Staff; Legislative Director
Kotman, Dan
Communications Director
Gordon, Brian
Constituent Services Officer
Miller, Karen
Constituent Services Officer
Pelzer, Nicole
Constituent Services Officer
Faust, Jessica
Deputy District Director
Steiskal, Deb
District Director
Doyle, Renee
Senior Legislative Assistant
Frye, Jason
Legislative Assistant
Wysocki, Kevin
Legislative Assistant
Haas, Amanda
Legislative Correspondent
Boland, Robert
Chief of Staff; Legislative Director
Hall, Mikayla
Press Secretary
Harper, Barbara
Constituent Services Representative
Rubin, Kim
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Michele Bachmann Committees
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Michele Bachmann Biography
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  • Elected: 2006, 4th term.
  • District: Minnesota 6
  • Born: Apr. 06, 1956, Waterloo, IA
  • Home: Stillwater
  • Education:

    Winona State U., B.A. 1978, Oral Roberts U., J.D. 1986, Col. of William and Mary, LL.M. 1988

  • Professional Career:

    Practicing atty., 1995-2000.

  • Political Career:

    MN Senate, 2000-06.

  • Ethnicity: White/Caucasian
  • Religion:

    Christian

  • Family: Married (Marcus); 5 children

With her short-lived presidential run in 2012, Republican Michele Bachmann solidified her standing as the tea party movement’s most identifiable leader in Congress. While she has achieved national celebrity, her frequent misstatements of fact and fire-breathing conservative rhetoric have made her controversial, and Bachmann barely won reelection to the House in 2012. She announced on May 29, 2013 that she will not run again in 2014, a decision that spared her party another tough fight to hold on to the seat. Read More

With her short-lived presidential run in 2012, Republican Michele Bachmann solidified her standing as the tea party movement’s most identifiable leader in Congress. While she has achieved national celebrity, her frequent misstatements of fact and fire-breathing conservative rhetoric have made her controversial, and Bachmann barely won reelection to the House in 2012. She announced on May 29, 2013 that she will not run again in 2014, a decision that spared her party another tough fight to hold on to the seat.

Bachmann grew up in cities across the Midwest and attended Winona State University, where she met her husband while working on Democrat Jimmy Carter’s 1976 presidential campaign. She became disillusioned with Carter and his party’s position on abortion rights and gravitated toward Ronald Reagan and the Republican Party in 1980. Bachmann and her husband, Marcus, both born-again Christians, moved to Tulsa, where she earned a degree at Coburn Law School at Oral Roberts University. After studying tax law at the College of William and Mary, Bachmann landed a job as a U.S. Treasury Department attorney in St. Paul, arguing criminal and civil tax cases. She and her husband raised five children and provided a home for 23 foster children.

Bachmann’s political career began in 1999, with a losing bid for the Stillwater school board. A year later, she won a seat in the state Senate by defeating a moderate Republican incumbent in the primary. In the legislature, Bachmann sought to protect private property rights, limit government spending, and cut taxes. She was a prominent abortion rights opponent and gained publicity in 2004 for leading an unsuccessful fight for a state constitutional amendment to ban same-sex marriage.

In 2006, 6th District Republican Mark Kennedy ran for the U.S. Senate. With support from cultural conservatives, Bachmann defeated three other candidates at the Republican nominating convention and no one challenged her in the primary. In the general election, there were clear ideological differences between Bachmann and Democratic nominee Patty Wetterling, who became a nationally recognized advocate for missing children after her 11-year-old son, Jacob, was abducted in 1989 and never found. Wetterling’s support for abortion rights and same-sex marriage and her call for the withdrawal of U.S. troops from Iraq prompted Republicans to portray her as too liberal for the district. President George W. Bush helped Bachmann raise money, and Wetterling got help from abortion rights group EMILY’s List.

Wetterling spent $3.2 million to Bachmann’s $2.7 million. Bachmann downplayed cultural issues and emphasized her opposition to tax increases. Wetterling received a burst of positive publicity in October, when Democrats deployed her as a spokesman during a scandal involving a Republican lawmaker’s sexual overtures to congressional pages. But Bachmann’s bill to establish a task force on Internet crimes against juveniles gave her credence on the issue as well. Polls showed Wetterling surging ahead after the scandal broke, but her lead was fleeting. In a difficult year for Republicans, Bachmann won a decisive 50%-42% victory.

In the House, Bachmann established a strongly conservative voting record and a reputation for controversial statements. She is a founder of the congressional Tea Party Caucus, and she has said she considers her role in Washington as that of “a foreign correspondent behind enemy lines.” She stoutly refused to engage in earmarked spending for her district. Bachmann also got a spate of national attention when she told The Washington Times that she would report on her census form only the number of people in her household because, she said, that is all the Constitution requires.

But Bachmann has a tendency to jumble her facts, which has brought her less than desirable media scrutiny at times. The Washington Post’s “Fact Checker” column called her the least truthful of all the 2012 GOP presidential contenders. Similarly, the fact-checking website PolitFact found that, as of January 2013, half of the Bachmann statements it analyzed either were mostly or entirely false.

Bachmann told an audience in Concord, N.H., in March 2011 that the city was where the Revolutionary War began; the actual location was Concord, Mass. She earlier said the drafters of the Constitution and Declaration of Independence “worked tirelessly until slavery was no more in the United States;” slavery wasn’t abolished until the next century. During the swine flu scare in 2009, Bachmann told the conservative Pajamas Media, “I find it interesting that it was back in the 1970s that the swine flu broke out then under Democrat President Jimmy Carter.” The 1970s flu outbreak happened during Republican Gerald Ford’s presidency. Bachmann also accused then Democratic House Speaker Nancy Pelosi of accumulating a $100,000 “bar tab” flying on military aircraft, when in fact the figure was for all in-flight costs.

In July 2012, one of Bachmann’s claims touched off a partisan furor. She and several other House Republicans accused Huma Abedin, a top adviser to Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and the wife of former Democratic Rep. Anthony Weiner, of being linked to the Muslim Brotherhood, an Islamist group accused of terrorist ties. Other Republicans emphatically denounced the idea, including Arizona Sen. John McCain, and some Democrats called for Bachmann to be removed from her plum seat on the Intelligence Committee. House Speaker John Boehner declined to do so, though he said the lawmakers’ accusation was “pretty dangerous.” Her former presidential campaign manager, Ed Rollins, told National Review Online, “She’s close to crossing that kook line, and Boehner and the others may be ready to dismiss her as a serious player.”

Bachmann never has had a close relationship with GOP leaders. She irked Boehner allies in 2011 when she was among the lawmakers who would leave party conference meetings midway through to give interviews, according to Robert Draper’s 2012 book, Do Not Ask What Good We Do. She ran in 2010 for chairman of the Republican Conference, the No. 4 post in the majority leadership, but withdrew from the race before the vote when it became clear that Texas Republican Jeb Hensarling, the leadership’s choice, would prevail. Bachmann also reportedly has had trouble retaining staff—a Washington Times newspaper investigation in 2013 found that she had an annual employee turnover rate of 46%, second to Texas Democrat Sheila Jackson Lee.

Nevertheless, Bachmann remained a wildly popular national figure among conservative and tea party voters. She often describes a vision of government that limits it to a strict reading of its constitutional obligations. She sponsored seminars at the Capitol for “studying and learning the Declaration, the Constitution and the Bill of Rights,” to which she invited other House members. The first, in December 2010, featured Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia. She was one of 33 Republicans to oppose a temporary increase in the nation’s debt limit in early January 2013, saying, “The days of fantasy economics are inevitably coming to a dreadful end.”

Amid all this, Bachmann did some legislating. She got a bill through the House in March 2012 to build a new $700 million bridge between Minnesota and Wisconsin, though environmentalists opposed the idea. In 2009, she won amendments to the Dodd-Frank financial regulation overhaul that prohibit elected officials from receiving money from an entity they voted to create, and that bar organizations indicted for vote fraud from eligibility for housing counseling or legal assistance grants. Bachmann also successfully sponsored amendments to the Internet gambling bill that year that barred fathers delinquent on child support payments from Internet gambling.

During her first bid for reelection in 2008, $2 million flowed into the campaign of her Democratic challenger, Elwyn Tinklenberg, after Bachmann said in an appearance on MSNBC that presidential candidate Barack Obama “may have anti-American views,” and suggested that the news media investigate all members of Congress to find who might be “anti-American.” Democrats accused her of McCarthyism. Bachmann responded, “I have strong views,” and charged that liberal bloggers perpetuated the story because they hate her. Conservative donors filled Bachmann’s coffers, and she outspent Tinklenberg $3.6 million to $2.5 million. But Bachmann won by only 46%-43%, with 10% of the vote going to Independence Party candidate Bob Anderson.

In 2010, she was again a target for Democratic activists, who funneled money into the district to help Democratic state Sen. Tarryl Clark. Bachmann raised $13.6 million, while Clark raised $4.7 million. Former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin and former Minnesota Gov. Tim Pawlenty campaigned for Bachmann, while President Obama and former President Bill Clinton stumped for Clark. This time, Bachmann won with a much improved 53%-40%, with 6% for the Independence Party’s Anderson, who ran again.

In 2011, some Minnesota Republicans were urging Bachmann to challenge Democratic Sen. Amy Klobuchar in 2012. But Bachmann set her sights higher. In June 2011, she announced her candidacy for president. Though she was initially viewed as an underdog, Bachmann’s presidential bid got off to a surprisingly fast start. With Romney as the presumed front-runner, tea party activists were looking for a more conservative alternative and Bachmann briefly fit the bill. The former Massachusetts governor was unacceptable to many conservative GOP voters because of his past support for abortion rights and for a state health care reform law that became the model for Obama’s. With tea party support, Bachmann won the Iowa straw poll in August 2011.

But her campaign could not sustain its early momentum. Critically, when Texas Gov. Rick Perry, a conservative stalwart, entered the race, he was viewed as a more viable conservative alternative to Romney and Bachmann’s poll numbers slid. After attacking Perry for ordering young girls in Texas to get vaccinated for the sexually transmitted human papillomavirus, she claimed that the vaccination could lead to mental retardation, a charge that scientists denounced as false. More trouble followed when Rollins, her campaign manager, abruptly quit and much of her New Hampshire campaign staff resigned in October 2011.

As a native of Iowa, Bachmann needed a strong showing in the state’s caucus on January 3. The sudden surge of former Sen. Rick Santorum of Pennsylvania upset her play for evangelicals and social conservatives. Like Bachmann, Santorum campaigned as an unabashed culture warrior opposed to abortion and gay rights. She finished a disappointing sixth place, with just 5% of the vote. Santorum and Romney fought to a draw, with 25.6% of the vote each. (The final count showed Santorum finishing ahead with 34 votes, but trouble with ballots in several precincts cast doubt on the results.) Bachmann dropped out of the race the day after the caucus.

In November, Bachmann endured her toughest reelection battle yet. She was running in a new district after post-2010-census redistricting put her Stillwater home in the same district as Democratic Rep. Betty McCollum’s, in the newly drawn 4th. Bachmann decided to run in the new 6th, where she had gone to high school and college. (Candidates for Congress are not required to live in the district.)

She drew a strong Democratic-Farmer-Labor opponent in Jim Graves, a wealthy hotel executive, who hammered her for frequent absences from the House during the presidential contest. Bill Clinton put in an appearance for Graves, helping him raise $2.3 million. Bachmann, with her reservoir of support from the presidential race, raised nearly 10 times as much, yet won only 50.5% to 49.3%—a victory well below Romney’s 56% showing in the district. Graves decisively won his hometown of St. Cloud, but couldn’t keep up with Bachmann in exurban Sherburne and Wright counties. She also easily won Carver County, part of which was added in redistricting, and she narrowly carried the district’s population base in suburban Anoka County.

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Michele Bachmann Election Results
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2012 General
Michele Bachmann (R)
Votes: 179,240
Percent: 50.61%
Jim Graves (DFL)
Votes: 174,944
Percent: 49.39%
2012 Primary
Michele Bachmann (R)
Votes: 14,569
Percent: 80.35%
Stephen Thompson (R)
Votes: 2,322
Percent: 12.81%
Aubrey Immelman
Votes: 1,242
Percent: 6.85%
Prior Winning Percentages
2010 (53%), 2008 (46%), 2006 (50%)
Michele Bachmann Votes and Bills
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National Journal’s rating system is an objective method of analyzing voting. The liberal score means that the lawmaker’s votes were more liberal than that percentage of his colleagues’ votes. The conservative score means his votes were more conservative than that percentage of his colleagues’ votes. The composite score is an average of a lawmaker’s six issue-based scores. See all NJ Voting

More Liberal
More Conservative
2013 2012 2011
Economic 21 (L) : 79 (C) 15 (L) : 85 (C) 50 (L) : 50 (C)
Social - (L) : 87 (C) 18 (L) : 82 (C) - (L) : 83 (C)
Foreign 24 (L) : 76 (C) 27 (L) : 73 (C) 9 (L) : 86 (C)
Composite 17.2 (L) : 82.8 (C) 20.0 (L) : 80.0 (C) 23.3 (L) : 76.7 (C)
Interest Group Ratings

The vote ratings by 10 special interest groups provide insight into a lawmaker’s general ideology and the degree to which he or she agrees with the group’s point of view. Two organizations provide just one combined rating for 2011 and 2012, the two sessions of the 112th Congress. They are the ACLU and the ITIC. About the interest groups.

20112012
FRC100100
LCV69
CFG8991
ITIC-73
NTU7585
20112012
COC80-
ACLU-0
ACU95100
ADA05
AFSCME20-
Key House Votes

The key votes show how a member of Congress voted on the major bills of the year. N indicates a "no" vote; Y a "yes" vote. If a member voted "present" or was absent, the bill caption is not shown. For a complete description of the bills included in key votes, see the Almanac's Guide to Usage.

    • Pass GOP budget
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • End fiscal cliff
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • Extend payroll tax cut
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • Find AG in contempt
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Stop student loan hike
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Repeal health care
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Raise debt limit
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Pass cut, cap, balance
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Defund Planned Parenthood
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Repeal lightbulb ban
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Speed troop withdrawal
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Regulate financial firms
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2010
    • Pass tax cuts for some
    • Vote:
    • Year: 2010
    • Stop detainee transfers
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2010
    • Legalize immigrants' kids
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2010
    • Repeal don't ask, tell
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2010
    • Limit campaign funds
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2010
    • Overturn Ledbetter
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Pass $820 billion stimulus
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Let guns in national parks
    • Vote:
    • Year: 2009
    • Pass cap-and-trade
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Bar federal abortion funds
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Pass health care bill
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Bail out financial markets
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2008
    • Repeal D.C. gun law
    • Vote:
    • Year: 2008
    • Overhaul FISA
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2008
    • Increase minimum wage
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • Expand SCHIP
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • Raise CAFE standards
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • Share immigration data
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
    • Foreign aid abortion ban
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
    • Ban gay bias in workplace
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • Withdraw troops 8/08
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • No operations in Iran
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • Free trade with Peru
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
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