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Republican

Rep. John Culberson (R)

John Culberson Contact
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Email: n/a
DC Contact Information

Phone: 202-225-2571

Address: 2352 RHOB, DC 20515

State Office Contact Information

Phone: (713) 682-8828

Address: 10000 Memorial Drive, Houston TX 77024-3490

John Culberson Staff
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Sort by INTEREST NAME TITLE
Inglee, Corey
Legislative Assistant
Knowles, Catherine
Deputy Chief of Staff; Legislative Director
Inglee, Corey
Legislative Assistant
Inglee, Corey
Legislative Assistant
Inglee, Corey
Legislative Assistant
Inglee, Corey
Legislative Assistant
Inglee, Corey
Legislative Assistant
West, Michelle
Legislative Assistant; Legislative Correspondent
West, Michelle
Legislative Assistant; Legislative Correspondent
Buki, Christopher
Legislative Assistant; Legislative Correspondent
Knowles, Catherine
Deputy Chief of Staff; Legislative Director
Inglee, Corey
Legislative Assistant
Inglee, Corey
Legislative Assistant
Inglee, Corey
Legislative Assistant
Inglee, Corey
Legislative Assistant
Inglee, Corey
Legislative Assistant
Knowles, Catherine
Deputy Chief of Staff; Legislative Director
Inglee, Corey
Legislative Assistant
Knowles, Catherine
Deputy Chief of Staff; Legislative Director
Inglee, Corey
Legislative Assistant
Knowles, Catherine
Deputy Chief of Staff; Legislative Director
Knowles, Catherine
Deputy Chief of Staff; Legislative Director
Buki, Christopher
Legislative Assistant; Legislative Correspondent
Knowles, Catherine
Deputy Chief of Staff; Legislative Director
Inglee, Corey
Legislative Assistant
Knowles, Catherine
Deputy Chief of Staff; Legislative Director
Knowles, Catherine
Deputy Chief of Staff; Legislative Director
Knowles, Catherine
Deputy Chief of Staff; Legislative Director
Knowles, Catherine
Deputy Chief of Staff; Legislative Director
Inglee, Corey
Legislative Assistant
Inglee, Corey
Legislative Assistant
Knowles, Catherine
Deputy Chief of Staff; Legislative Director
Buki, Christopher
Legislative Assistant; Legislative Correspondent
Essalih, Ellie
District Scheduler; Office Manager
Gahun, Jamie
Chief of Staff; Office Manager; Scheduler
Inglee, Corey
Legislative Assistant
Knowles, Catherine
Deputy Chief of Staff; Legislative Director
McGinn, Beth
Communications Director
Pepper, Lindsay
District Scheduler
Taylor, Emily
Staff Assistant
West, Michelle
Legislative Assistant; Legislative Correspondent
Gahun, Jamie
Chief of Staff; Office Manager; Scheduler
McGinn, Beth
Communications Director
Knowles, Catherine
Deputy Chief of Staff; Legislative Director
Buki, Christopher
Legislative Assistant; Legislative Correspondent
Inglee, Corey
Legislative Assistant
West, Michelle
Legislative Assistant; Legislative Correspondent
Buki, Christopher
Legislative Assistant; Legislative Correspondent
West, Michelle
Legislative Assistant; Legislative Correspondent
Knowles, Catherine
Deputy Chief of Staff; Legislative Director
Essalih, Ellie
District Scheduler; Office Manager
Gahun, Jamie
Chief of Staff; Office Manager; Scheduler
Essalih, Ellie
District Scheduler; Office Manager
Gahun, Jamie
Chief of Staff; Office Manager; Scheduler
Pepper, Lindsay
District Scheduler
Taylor, Emily
Staff Assistant
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John Culberson Committees
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John Culberson Biography
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  • Elected: 2000, 7th term.
  • District: Texas 7
  • Born: Aug. 24, 1956, Houston
  • Home: Houston
  • Education:

    Southern Methodist U., B.A. 1981, S. TX Col. of Law, J.D. 1988

  • Professional Career:

    Jim Culberson Advertising, 1981-85; Practicing atty., 1988-2000.

  • Political Career:

    TX House of Reps., 1986-2000, Maj. whip, 1999-2000.

  • Ethnicity: White/Caucasian
  • Religion:

    Methodist

  • Family: Married (Belinda); 1 children

John Culberson, a conservative first elected in 2000, calls himself a “Jeffersonian Republican” and is passionate about transferring power from the federal to local governments. He’s also an appropriator with an interest in NASA, a major presence in his district. Read More

John Culberson, a conservative first elected in 2000, calls himself a “Jeffersonian Republican” and is passionate about transferring power from the federal to local governments. He’s also an appropriator with an interest in NASA, a major presence in his district.

Culberson grew up in Houston, the son of the owner of an advertising agency. He graduated from Southern Methodist University, South Texas College of Law, and then worked as a civil defense lawyer. In 1986, at age 29, Culberson won a seat in the Texas House, where he served for 14 years. In 2000, Republican Rep. Bill Archer, Bush’s successor in the House, retired after being forced to give up the chairmanship of the Ways and Means Committee by Republican term limits. The front-runners in the GOP primary were Culberson and Peter Wareing, a Houston merchant banker and son-in-law of Texas oilman Jack Blanton. Culberson led Wareing in the first round 38%-27%. Wareing spent nearly $4 million to Culberson’s $650,000, but Culberson had an extensive grassroots campaign and won the runoff four weeks later 60%-40%. The general election was no contest in this GOP-dominant district.

Culberson likes to say that his goal is to “let Texans run Texas.” He ranks among the House’s most conservative members, especially on social issues. When Houston veterans groups accused a Veterans’ Administration official in 2011 of banning religious speech—including the words “Jesus” and “God”—during services at the cemetery there, an angry Culberson vowed to zero out the official’s salary. VA officials said the claims were inaccurate, but transferred the woman to another job. He cosponsored Florida GOP Rep. Bill Posey’s 2009 “birther” bill requiring future presidential candidates to offer proof of citizenship in response to far-right theories, repeatedly proven false, that President Barack Obama was born overseas.

During the final days of the 2010 health care debate, he attended a Capitol Hill rally of the bill’s opponents and tossed loose pages of the 2,000-page document to the crowd. Like his predecessor, Archer, he dreams of junking the current tax system and replacing it with a national sales tax. Culberson sometimes goes his own way. He ruffled feathers as one of only two Texas Republicans to oppose the $400 billion Medicare expansion of 2003.

An amateur astronomer and self-proclaimed science buff, Culberson is an enthusiast for NASA and has an interest in nanotechnology research, which is a specialty at Rice. He sponsored a bill in 2012 to give the space agency’s administrator a 10-year term similar to that given to the FBI’s director, which he said would promote better planning. And in February 2013, he called for restructuring NASA, saying it lacked vision. He joined several conservatives in getting a provision into a 2011 spending measure that banned NASA from collaborating with China’s scientists.

Culberson was once an avid fan of Twitter and in 2009, was the House’s top user of the social media account, according to a University of Maryland study. But in recent years he has preferred Facebook, which he said draws fewer deliberately provocative “trolls.” He was an early proponent of requiring the House to post all non-emergency legislation online at least 72 hours before debate, a rules change that Republicans enacted in 2011.

Culberson has a coveted spot on Appropriations, which he has used to secure money for projects in his district, including medical research, flood control projects, and improvements to the Houston Ship Channel. He has fought with Houston officials who wanted money for local light rail projects, filing a formal objection with the Federal Transit Administration in December 2009 to stop a light-rail line because he said the local transit agency was in precarious financial shape—a charge agency officials said was based on outdated information. When he sought in 2012 to block funds from going to an expansion of two rail lines, the Houston Chronicle’s editorial page rebuked him for “trying to impose his own rules rather than work with local leaders.”

In 2008, Culberson faced his first well-financed Democratic challenger. Wind energy executive Michael Skelly spent nearly $3.1 million, including $1 million of his own money. Culberson spent a relatively modest $1.8 million. Skelly criticized Culberson’s lack of support for alternative energy and said he was not sufficiently helpful to the space program, citing Culberson’s call to reduce the bureaucracy at NASA, which employs about 20,000 people locally. Culberson ran as a strong social and fiscal conservative and won, 56%-42%. Since then, he has had no trouble winning reelection.

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John Culberson Election Results
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2012 General
John Culberson (R)
Votes: 142,793
Percent: 60.81%
James Cargas (D)
Votes: 85,553
Percent: 36.43%
2012 Primary
John Culberson (R)
Votes: 37,590
Percent: 86.29%
Bill Tofte (R)
Votes: 5,971
Percent: 13.71%
Prior Winning Percentages
2010 (81%), 2008 (56%), 2006 (59%), 2004 (64%), 2002 (89%), 2000 (74%)
John Culberson Votes and Bills
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National Journal’s rating system is an objective method of analyzing voting. The liberal score means that the lawmaker’s votes were more liberal than that percentage of his colleagues’ votes. The conservative score means his votes were more conservative than that percentage of his colleagues’ votes. The composite score is an average of a lawmaker’s six issue-based scores. See all NJ Voting

More Liberal
More Conservative
2013 2012 2011
Economic 31 (L) : 69 (C) 19 (L) : 80 (C) 21 (L) : 78 (C)
Social 34 (L) : 62 (C) - (L) : 91 (C) 30 (L) : 70 (C)
Foreign 5 (L) : 86 (C) 16 (L) : 81 (C) 26 (L) : 73 (C)
Composite 25.5 (L) : 74.5 (C) 13.8 (L) : 86.2 (C) 26.0 (L) : 74.0 (C)
Interest Group Ratings

The vote ratings by 10 special interest groups provide insight into a lawmaker’s general ideology and the degree to which he or she agrees with the group’s point of view. Two organizations provide just one combined rating for 2011 and 2012, the two sessions of the 112th Congress. They are the ACLU and the ITIC. About the interest groups.

20112012
FRC70100
LCV69
CFG6682
ITIC-82
NTU7876
20112012
COC100-
ACLU-7
ACU8792
ADA50
AFSCME0-
Key House Votes

The key votes show how a member of Congress voted on the major bills of the year. N indicates a "no" vote; Y a "yes" vote. If a member voted "present" or was absent, the bill caption is not shown. For a complete description of the bills included in key votes, see the Almanac's Guide to Usage.

    • Pass GOP budget
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • End fiscal cliff
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • Extend payroll tax cut
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Find AG in contempt
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Stop student loan hike
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Repeal health care
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Raise debt limit
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Pass cut, cap, balance
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Defund Planned Parenthood
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Repeal lightbulb ban
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Add endangered listings
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Speed troop withdrawal
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Regulate financial firms
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2010
    • Pass tax cuts for some
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2010
    • Stop detainee transfers
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2010
    • Legalize immigrants' kids
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2010
    • Repeal don't ask, tell
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2010
    • Limit campaign funds
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2010
    • Overturn Ledbetter
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Pass $820 billion stimulus
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Let guns in national parks
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Pass cap-and-trade
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Bar federal abortion funds
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Pass health care bill
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Bail out financial markets
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2008
    • Repeal D.C. gun law
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2008
    • Overhaul FISA
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2008
    • Increase minimum wage
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • Expand SCHIP
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • Raise CAFE standards
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • Share immigration data
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
    • Foreign aid abortion ban
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
    • Ban gay bias in workplace
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • Withdraw troops 8/08
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • No operations in Iran
    • Vote:
    • Year: 2007
    • Free trade with Peru
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
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The Almanac is a members-only database of searchable profiles compiled and adapted from the Almanac of American Politics. Comprehensive online profiles include biographical and political summaries of elected officials, campaign expenditures, voting records, interest-group ratings, and congressional staff look-ups. In-depth overviews of each state and house district are included as well, along with demographic data, analysis of voting trends, and political histories.
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