Almanac A members-only database of searchable profiles compiled and adapted from the Almanac of American Politics

Biography

Elected: 2008, 3rd term.

Born: February 18, 1964, Florence, AL

Home: Bowling Green

Education: U.S. Military Academy, B.S. 1987; Yale U., M.A. 1997.

Professional Career: V.P., Trace Die Cast, 2001-08.

Ethnicity: White/Caucasian

Religion: Church of Christ

Family: married (Beth) , 3 children

Republican Brett Guthrie, elected in 2008, has a military and business background that plays well with constituents, along with a reputation as a loyal party vote that endears him to GOP leaders. He holds a plum seat on the Energy and Commerce Committee, enabling him to work with fellow Kentucky Republican Ed Whitfield on protecting the state’s coal and oil industries.

A graduate of West Point, Guthrie served 14 years in the U.S. Army, first in the Reserve, then as a field artillery officer with the 101st Airborne division at Fort Campbell. After his discharge, Guthrie joined the family business in Bowling Green, Ky., Trace Die Cast, Inc., a leading supplier of aluminum castings for the automobile industry. His father had started the business with his savings and just five employees in the 1980s. Guthrie eventually became vice president. In 1998, Guthrie was elected to the state Senate, where he focused on education issues and became chairman of the Transportation Committee, helping the state develop its highway budget. Republicans expected him to eventually join the leadership ranks, but Guthrie had his sights set on Congress.

After GOP Rep. Ron Lewis announced his retirement, his longtime chief of staff, Daniel London, jumped into the race to succeed him. But leading local Republicans complained that they had rigged a succession plan: Lewis had waited until just before the filing deadline to announce his retirement, leaving little time for candidates other than London to file. London apologized and withdrew from the race. Guthrie avoided a contested primary and marshaled his resources for the contested general election.

The Democratic nominee was state Sen. David Boswell, a 30-year veteran of Kentucky politics. He ran as a conservative Democrat, and the two contenders were virtually indistinguishable on the issues. Both opposed abortion rights and supported gun ownership, and both spoke out against the massive bailout for the financial industry passed by Congress in the fall of 2008.

National Democrats made the contest one of their top priorities of 2008. Guthrie found himself neck-and-neck with Boswell in a district that had been held by a Republican for 15 years. He ran ads tying Boswell to liberal congressional Democrats and their opposition to offshore drilling. And he emphasized his military background to the district’s sizable active and retired military population. The Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee ran an ad claiming that Trace Die Cast had sent jobs to Mexico. Former President Bill Clinton stumped for Boswell in the district; and first lady Laura Bush put in an appearance for Guthrie. Guthrie proved more adept at fundraising, with a war chest of nearly $1.3 million compared to Boswell’s $917,000. He won 53%-47%.

Once in the House, Guthrie proved to be a dependable Republican. He was named in April 2012 to co-lead a bipartisan working group on how the federal government could more efficiently use wireless spectrum. The House passed a bill he sponsored in May 2011 that aimed to water down the Democrats’ health care law by converting mandatory funding for teaching health centers to a congressionally controlled appropriation. He earlier complained in 2009 that the health care overhaul “raises taxes for just about everyone,” although supporters noted it imposed a surtax on only the top 0.3% of households.

In 2012, Guthrie took a softer line in criticizing the Environmental Protection Agency than other Republicans on the Energy and Commerce Committee, telling the Owensboro Messenger-Inquirer that the agency needed to strike a better balance between regulation and the economy. “I’ve been to Mexico City and Beijing,” he said. “I don’t want to have to wear a mask when I go outside. But I want regulations that don’t put companies out of business and cost my district $60,000-a-year jobs.”

Guthrie rejoined the Education and the Workforce Committee for the 113th Congress (2013-14), saying he wanted to work on education and job-training issues for his state. The move was a sign that he might be thinking about higher office; he has been mentioned as a possible candidate for governor in 2015. He and Kentucky Democrat John Yarmuth formed the Congressional Bourbon Caucus in 2009. “I have Heaven Hill and Jim Beam in my district,” Guthrie told The Washington Post in 2012. “I lost Maker’s Mark in redistricting.” Guthrie sailed to reelection in 2010 and 2012.

Office Contact Information

MAIN OFFICE

(202) 225-3501

(202) 226-2019

RHOB- Rayburn House Office Building Room 2434
Washington, DC 20515-1702

MAIN OFFICE

(202) 225-3501

(202) 226-2019

RHOB- Rayburn House Office Building Room 2434
Washington, DC 20515-1702

DISTRICT OFFICE

(270) 842-9896

(270) 842-9081

996 Wilkinson Trace Suite B2
Bowling Green, KY 42103-3409

DISTRICT OFFICE

(270) 842-9896

(270) 842-9081

996 Wilkinson Trace Suite B2
Bowling Green, KY 42103-3409

DISTRICT OFFICE

(270) 438-6595

(270) 842-9081

2200 Airport Road
Owensboro, KY 42301-9488

DISTRICT OFFICE

(270) 438-6595

(270) 842-9081

2200 Airport Road
Owensboro, KY 42301-9488

DISTRICT OFFICE

(270) 438-6599

(270) 842-9081

411 West Lincoln Trail Boulevard
Radcliff, KY 40160-2046

DISTRICT OFFICE

(270) 438-6599

(270) 842-9081

411 West Lincoln Trail Boulevard
Radcliff, KY 40160-2046

CAMPAIGN OFFICE

PO Box 9639
Bowling Green, KY 42102-9693

CAMPAIGN OFFICE

1005 Wrenwood Drive
Bowling Green, KY 42103-1593

Staff

Sort by: Interest Name Title

Abortion

Emily Buckman
Legislative Assistant

Appropriations

Joel Miller
Legislative Counsel

Budget

Joel Miller
Legislative Counsel

Energy

Joel Miller
Legislative Counsel

Foreign

Joel Miller
Legislative Counsel

Gun Issues

Emily Buckman
Legislative Assistant

Health

Megan Jackson
Deputy Chief of Staff; Legislative Director

Homeland Security

Emily Buckman
Legislative Assistant

Housing

Joel Miller
Legislative Counsel

Human Rights

Emily Buckman
Legislative Assistant

Immigration

Emily Buckman
Legislative Assistant

Intelligence

Joel Miller
Legislative Counsel

Military

Joel Miller
Legislative Counsel

Privacy

Emily Buckman
Legislative Assistant

Science

Emily Buckman
Legislative Assistant

Small Business

Emily Buckman
Legislative Assistant

Social Security

Megan Jackson
Deputy Chief of Staff; Legislative Director

Tax

Emily Buckman
Legislative Assistant

Technology

Emily Buckman
Legislative Assistant

Telecommunications

Joel Miller
Legislative Counsel

Trade

Joel Miller
Legislative Counsel

Transportation

Emily Buckman
Legislative Assistant

Veterans

Joel Miller
Legislative Counsel

Women

Emily Buckman
Legislative Assistant

Election Results

2012 GENERAL
Brett Guthrie
Votes: 181,508
Percent: 64.3%
David Williams
Votes: 89,541
Percent: 31.72%
2012 PRIMARY
Brett Guthrie
Unopposed
2010 GENERAL
Brett Guthrie
Votes: 155,906
Percent: 67.89%
Ed Marksberry
Votes: 73,749
Percent: 32.11%
2010 PRIMARY
Brett Guthrie
Unopposed
2008 GENERAL
Brett Guthrie
Votes: 158,936
Percent: 52.57%
David Boswell
Votes: 143,379
Percent: 47.43%
2008 PRIMARY
Brett Guthrie
Unopposed
Prior Winning Percentages
2010 (68%), 2008 (53%)

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