Almanac A members-only database of searchable profiles compiled and adapted from the Almanac of American Politics

Biography

Elected: 2004, 6th term.

Born: October 8, 1954, Lansing, MI

Home: Roswell

Education: U. of MI, B.A. 1976, M.D. 1979

Professional Career: Practicing orthopedic surgeon, 1979-2002; Asst. prof., Emory U., 2002-present.

Ethnicity: White/Caucasian

Religion: Presbyterian

Family: married (Elizabeth) , 1 children

Tom Price, a Republican first elected in 2004, has become one of the leading spokesmen for his party’s conservative message. His stridency can put him at odds with the House Republican leadership, and he waged an unsuccessful bid in 2012 for Republican Conference chairman against an ally of Speaker John Boehner. He took over in 2015 as Budget Committee chairman, having decided a year earlier against running for another leadership post or for the Senate to position himself to succeed Paul Ryan in the chairmanship.

Price grew up in Michigan and graduated from the University of Michigan and its medical school. His father and grandfather were both physicians. He did his residency in orthopedic surgery at Emory Medical School and then moved to Roswell, where he was involved in civic affairs and was president of the Rotary Club. Working closely with the Medical Association of Georgia, he campaigned locally against President Bill Clinton’s health care plan in the early 1990s. When a seat opened in the state Senate in 1996, he was elected and quickly moved up the leadership ranks to become majority leader when Republicans captured the Senate in 2002 for the first time since Reconstruction.

When Republican Rep. Johnny Isakson announced he was running for the Senate seat being vacated by Democrat Zell Miller, the contest for this heavily Republican open seat was hard-fought and big-spending. Three state senators ran—Price from Fulton County, and Robert Lamutt and Chuck Clay from Cobb County. Price spent $499,000 of his own money and contrasted his work in medicine with the legal and business careers of his two main opponents. He highlighted his fiscal conservatism and strong support for limiting jury awards in malpractice suits, a position that won him considerable support from the medical community. Calling the federal income tax “broken,” he supported a national retail sales tax. He said that he had “a surgeon’s mentality. … I get things done.”

Price led the first round of the primary with 35% of the vote; Lamutt made it into the runoff with 28%. Lamutt, who gave $1.5 million to his campaign, criticized Price as a “special interest” candidate because he raised large sums from fellow doctors. He also attacked Price’s 2003 support for a 25-cent tax increase on cigarettes. Price defended his vote as a tool to reduce local property taxes. In the runoff,Price won 54%-46%.

In the House, Price was among the Tea Party Caucus’ original members. He also had, through 2013, a lifetime score of 93 percent from the anti-tax group Club for Growth. Price has advocated the abolition of the Internal Revenue Service and replacing almost all taxes with a national sales tax. He told Fox News after President Barack Obama was reelected in 2012 that he disagreed with Boehner’s position to abandon efforts to repeal Obama’s health care reform law. He introduced his own legislation to create tax incentives for consumers to purchase insurance on the individual insurance market.

Taking the Budget job, Price said he hoped to tackle reforms to Social Security, an area that Ryan -- and most politicians -- have studiously avoided for fear of alienating senior citizens. Price said in a January speech: "All the kinds of things you know about, whether it’s means testing, whether it’s increasing the age of eligibility. The kind of choices — whether it’s providing much greater choices for individuals to voluntarily select the kind of manner in which they believe they ought to be able to invest their working dollars as they go through their lifetime — all those things ought to be on the table and discussed.” He also said he would continue to seek to repeal the Affordable Care Act, but said using  the budget reconciliation process, which would avoid a Senate filibuster, is not a "silver bullet."

Though he later called Obama's fiscal 2016 budget blueprint "reckless," he said he agreed with parts of it, including a proposal to use taxes on profits that U.S. companies reap overseas to help fund a massive public works program. He also said that he wasn't fazed by the president's veto threats. “If we’re able to put pieces of legislation on the president’s desk ... if he signs it, then from our perspective, we get a win because it’s good public policy,” Price said. “If he vetoes it, which is his right to be able to do, it provides the nation with a contrast, the difference between the two visions, and it’s important for the nation to appreciate that vision in order to make the kinds of decisions that need to be made for us to move forward as a Congress.”

In 2010, Price became chairman of the House Republican Policy Committee, the party’s in-house idea factory. He focused on health care and energy policy, repeatedly calling for more domestic oil and gas production. During negotiations over raising the federal debt limit in 2011, he said on CNN that a default represented no large risk because debt-holders still would be paid, an assertion that the fact-checking website PolitiFact found to be false. When Democrats sought to extend unemployment benefits in 2010, Price cited economists who warned of a “moral hazard” in doing so. Price was also a leading organizer of the House Republicans’ protest in the House chamber during the August 2008 recess, which was aimed at pressuring then-Democratic Speaker Nancy Pelosi to bring to the floor a bill allowing offshore oil exploration in America’s coastal waters. His enthusiasm for playing political hardball impressed his GOP colleagues, as did his energy for the fight—he told The Atlanta Journal-Constitution he gets to his office before 7:30 a.m. and leaves at 10:30 or 11 p.m.

Price hoped to parlay his hard work into a higher leadership post, and in late 2012, he sought the chairmanship of the Republican Conference, the No. 4-ranking job. Although he had the backing of Ryan, the GOP’s 2012 vice presidential nominee, Boehner favored Washington state’s Cathy McMorris Rodgers, the conference vice chair. Boehner reportedly offered Price a ceremonial leadership posting to drop out and publicly pledge his loyalty to Boehner, but Price declined the offer and lost to McMorris Rodgers in a closed-door vote.

Price has been reelected with only minor opposition and ran unopposed in 2010. He did get some negative attention in 2010, when it was revealed he was among eight lawmakers under investigation by the Office of Congressional Ethics for holding fundraisers or receiving donations from businesses shortly before voting on a Wall Street regulation bill. The House Ethics Committee subsequently dropped the charges.

Journal-Constitution columnist Jim Galloway described Price in January 2013 as "undoubtedly the most ambitious member of the Georgia delegation." News reports at the time indicated Price was mulling a primary challenge to Georgia Sen. Saxby Chambliss, who drew fire from conservatives for his willingness to work with Democrats. But Price ultimately decided against running. He was unlikely not get much help from Georgia’s Republican establishment: He originally backed fellow Rep. Nathan Deal for governor in 2010, then switched his allegiance to ex-Georgia Secretary of State Karen Handel while the rest of the state’s delegation stuck with Deal. After Deal won the election, Price reportedly was all but shut out of a role in the redistricting process.

Instead, Ryan named Price as Budget's vice chairman. He was one of the key House critics of the Obama administration's implementation of the Affordable Care Act, and sponsored a bill barring the Internal Revenue Service from enforcing or implementing the law. It passed the House but went nowhere in the Democratic-controlled Senate. Another bill he sponsored that passed the House on a largely party-line vote in April 2014 would require the Congressional Budget Office to assess the broad economic impacts of major legislation beyond their simple monetary cost.

Office Contact Information

MAIN OFFICE

(202) 225-4501

(202) 225-4656

CHOB- Cannon House Office Building Room 100
Washington, DC 20515-1006

MAIN OFFICE

(202) 225-4501

(202) 225-4656

CHOB- Cannon House Office Building Room 100
Washington, DC 20515-1006

DISTRICT OFFICE

(770) 998-0049

(770) 990-0050

85-C Mill Street Suite 300
Roswell, GA 30075

DISTRICT OFFICE

(770) 998-0049

(770) 990-0050

85-C Mill Street Suite 300
Roswell, GA 30075

CAMPAIGN OFFICE

(770) 321-7900

PO Box 425
Roswell, GA 30077

CAMPAIGN OFFICE

PO Box 425
Roswell, GA 30077

Staff

Sort by: Interest Name Title

Abortion

Carla DiBlasio
Legislative Assistant

Aerospace

Warren Negri
Legislative Assistant

Agriculture

Kyle Zebley
Legislative Director

Appropriations

Kyle Zebley
Legislative Director

Budget

Kyle Zebley
Legislative Director

Congress

Warren Negri
Legislative Assistant

Education

Kyle Zebley
Legislative Director

Energy

Kyle Zebley
Legislative Director

Environment

Warren Negri
Legislative Assistant

Family

Carla DiBlasio
Legislative Assistant

Finance

Warren Negri
Legislative Assistant

Foreign

Kyle Zebley
Legislative Director

Govt Ops

Warren Negri
Legislative Assistant

Gun Issues

Warren Negri
Legislative Assistant

Health

Carla DiBlasio
Legislative Assistant

Homeland Security

Kyle Zebley
Legislative Director

Housing

Warren Negri
Legislative Assistant

Human Rights

Kyle Zebley
Legislative Director

Immigration

Kyle Zebley
Legislative Director

Intelligence

Kyle Zebley
Legislative Director

Intergovernmental

Warren Negri
Legislative Assistant

Judiciary

Warren Negri
Legislative Assistant

Labor

Kyle Zebley
Legislative Director

Land Use

Warren Negri
Legislative Assistant

Medicare

Carla DiBlasio
Legislative Assistant

Military

Kyle Zebley
Legislative Director

Science

Warren Negri
Legislative Assistant

Seniors

Carla DiBlasio
Legislative Assistant

Small Business

Warren Negri
Legislative Assistant

Social Security

Carla DiBlasio
Legislative Assistant

Tax

Kyle Zebley
Legislative Director

Technology

Warren Negri
Legislative Assistant

Telecommunications

Warren Negri
Legislative Assistant

Trade

Kyle Zebley
Legislative Director

Transportation

Kyle Zebley
Legislative Director

Welfare

Carla DiBlasio
Legislative Assistant

Election Results

2012 GENERAL
Tom Price
Votes: 189,669
Percent: 64.51%
Jeff Kazanow
Votes: 104,365
Percent: 35.49%
2012 PRIMARY
Tom Price
Unopposed
2010 GENERAL
Tom Price
Unopposed
2010 PRIMARY
Tom Price
Votes: 70,049
Percent: 100.0%
2008 GENERAL
Tom Price
Votes: 231,520
Percent: 68.48%
Bill Jones
Votes: 106,551
Percent: 31.52%
2008 PRIMARY
Tom Price
Votes: 30,957
Percent: 100.0%
Prior Winning Percentages
2010 (unopposed), 2008 (68%), 2006 (72%), 2004 (100%)

To order a print copy of the 2016 edition of the Almanac of American Politics, click here. For questions about print orders, call Columbia Books at 1-888-265-0600 ext 0266 or email customer service.

For questions about the digital Almanac, please contact your Dedicated Advisor or Membership@NationalJournal.com.

×